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Viewing 1 to 30 of 159
2010-09-30
Technical Paper
2010-01-1660
Jean Francois Bousquie
This paper describes the Airbus plans to use ADS-B in the future concept of operations in both the European SESAR and the US NEXTGEN concepts of operations. It details the different steps that are currently considered by Airbus roadmap to deploy ADS-B services and functions. In particular, the following points are described: Use of ADS-B OUT in Non Radar Airspace Use of ADS-B IN and the associated Airbus functions to offer a better Air Traffic Situation Awareness (ATSAW) package: the various applications for airborne, in trail climb/descent procedures or enhanced visual acquisition are particularly detailed. Use of ADS-B for the future Spacing function as currently considered in the initial ASAS implementation for SESAR: the three “Remain Behind”, “Merge at Waypoint then Remain behind” and the “Heading then merge behind” applications are explained.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2501
Jean-Pierre Cachelet
This paper proposes a rearview on aeronautical innovation, addresses some 2000-2010 new products, and suggests elements of future vision, serving passengers aspirations. Over 100 years, aeronautics brilliantly domesticated flight: feasibility, safety, efficiency, international travel, traffic volume and noise, allowing airlines to run a business, really connecting real people. Despite some maturations, new developments should extend the notion of passenger service. So far, turbofans became silent and widebodies opened ‘air-bus’ travel for widespread business, tourism or education. Today airports symbolize cities and vitalize regional economies. 2000-2010 saw the full double-decker, the new eco-friendly freighter and electronic ticketing. In technology, new winglets and neo classical engines soon will save short-range blockfuel. In systems and maintenance, integrated modular avionics and onboard data systems give new flexibility, incl by data links to ground.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2769
Georges Hardier, Cédric seren, Pierre Ezerzere
The introduction of Fly-By-Wire (FBW) and the increasing level of automation contribute to improve the safety of civil aircraft significantly. These technological steps permit the development of advanced capabilities for detecting, protecting and optimizing A/C guidance and control. Accordingly, this higher complexity requires extending the availability of aircraft states, some flight parameters becoming key parameters to ensure a good behaviour of the flight control systems. Consequently, the monitoring and consolidation of these signals appear as major issues to achieve the expected autonomy. Two different alternatives occur to get this result. The usual solution consists in introducing many functionally redundant elements (sensors) to enlarge the way the key parameters are measured. This solution corresponds to the classical hardware redundancy, but penalizes the overall system performance in terms of weight, power consumption, space requirements, and extra maintenance needs.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2805
Maxime Lastera, Eric Alata, Jean Arlat, Yves Deswarte, David Powell, Bertrand Leconte, Cristina Simache
Traditionally, software in avionics has been totally separated from open-world software, in order to avoid any interaction that could corrupt critical on-board systems. However, new aircraft generations need more interaction with off-board systems to offer extended services, which makes these information flows potentially dangerous. In a previous work, we have proposed the use of virtualization to ensure dependability of critical applications despite bidirectional communication between critical on-board systems and untrusted off-board systems. We have developed a test bed to assess the performance impact induced by the use of virtualization. In this work, various configurations have been experimented that range from a basic machine without an OS up to the complete architecture featuring a hypervisor and an OS running in a virtual machine. Several tests (computation, memory, network) are carried out, and timing measures are collected on different hypervisors.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2804
Philippe Goupil, Andres Marcos
The state-of-practice for aircraft manufacturers to diagnose guidance & control faults and obtain full flight envelope protection at all times is to provide high levels of dissimilar hardware redundancy. This ensures sufficient available control action and allows performing coherency tests, cross and consistency checks, voting mechanisms and built-in test techniques of varying sophistication. This hardware-redundancy based fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) approach is nowadays the standard industrial practice and fits also into current aircraft certification processes while ensuring the highest level of safety standards. In the context of future “sustainable” aircraft (More Affordable, Smarter, Cleaner and Quieter), the Electrical Flight Control System (EFCS) design objectives, originating from structural loads design constraints, are becoming more and more stringent.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2801
Florian Cazes, Corinne Mailhes, Marie Chabert, Philippe Goupil, Rémy Dayre, Hervé Le Berre
In the framework of the aircraft global optimization, for future and upcoming programs, current research interests include more Electrical Flight Control System (EFCS) autonomy for a more easy-to-handle aircraft. A possible solution is to increase the number of redundant flight parameter sensors but to the detriment of the aircraft weight and so to the cost and performances. This paper proposes an algorithm using PLS (Partial Least Squares) to estimate a flight parameter from independent sensor measurements. The estimates are then used as so-called “software” or “virtual” sensors, allowing aircraft weight saving. This algorithm is based on an iterative processing and thus can be used in real time in the embedded flight control computer. Furthermore, the resulting flight parameter estimates can be used to detect failures. Different detection strategies are proposed and results show that this method can lead to robust detections.
2011-10-18
Technical Paper
2011-01-2717
Gernot Ladstaetter, Nicolas Reichert, Thomas Obert
Over the last few years, IT systems have quickly found their way onboard aircrafts, driven by the continuous pursuit of improved safety and efficiency in aircraft operation, but also in an attempt to provide the ultimate in-flight experience for passengers. Along with IT systems and communication links came IT security as a new factor in the equation when evaluating and monitoring the operational risk that needs to be managed during the operation of the aircraft. This is mainly due to the fact that security deficiencies can cause services to be unavailable, or even worse, to be exploited by intentional attacks or inadvertent actions. Aircraft manufacturers needed to develop new processes and had to get organized accordingly in order to efficiently and effectively address these new risks.
2011-06-13
Technical Paper
2011-38-0088
Fabien Dezitter
In 1994, an ATR-72 crashed at Roselawn, Indiana, USA. It has been speculated that accident was due to Supercooled Large Droplet (SLD) icing. This accident led to a modification of the regulation rules with the definition of the Appendix O which includes freezing drizzle and freezing rain icing conditions. The associated NPRM (Notice of Proposed Rule Making) has been distributed to industry for comments on 29th June 2010 and could be applicable by beginning 2012. In order to comply with this new rule, the simulation tools, as Acceptable Means of Compliance, have to be improved and validated for these conditions. The paper presents the work performed within Airbus to review, improve and assess simulation tools capability to accurately predict physical phenomena related to SLD. It focuses in particular on splashing and bouncing phenomena which have been highlighted as the first order effects.
2008-09-16
Technical Paper
2008-01-2320
Carter L. Boad, David Colebourn
Electroimpact has developed a new Fastener Feed System which provides an automated solution for fasteners previously hand fed via drop tubes. The hardware is simple, compact, and is supplied a fraction of the cost of hoppers or cartridges. It can be used as a primary feed system or it can be used as an auxiliary feed system when combined with feed systems designed for high quantities of fasteners. We have installed this system on the A380 Stage 0 LVER lower panel wing machines and feed 5 diameters, 10 grips each, for a total of 50 different fastener types. This system moves 547 total fasteners per ship set from manual feed to automatic feed, saving considerable build time.
2007-09-24
Technical Paper
2007-01-3328
S.Z. Barley
A test has been performed using a scaled aircraft wing section in an icing tunnel facility. The model had an electro-thermal ice protection system installed. The tests performed considered both anti-icing and de-icing modes of operation. The results have been assessed using numerical codes and the effect of model scaling has been considered. The non-scaled skin thickness of the model was found to modify the predicted behaviour of a full-scale installation, predominantly due to lateral conduction effects. The extent of this has been assessed and recommendations are made as to the performance that may be expected at full-scale.
2008-06-30
Article
Because orbital drilling allows for drilling and finishing in a single operation, a fully implemented process can reduce drilling time by 50% over conventional methods, according to Novator. The need to disassemble the parts to remove burrs is eliminated.
2008-06-30
Article
The need to develop alternative fuels for all transport systems is becoming increasingly important, and Airbus is taking part in the French CALIN (Carburant Alternatifs et Systèmes d’Injection Innovants) research project. Launched in July 2007, it is scheduled to continue for another 20 months. In CALIN, Airbus is working with major research institutions including ONERA, IFP, and CNRS, and with industry partner Safran.
2008-06-30
Article
Very large aircraft do not necessarily have to impose high noise levels on the environment, a fact that has been demonstrated by the Airbus A380’s appearance at international air shows and during its world tours. Now, Airbus is claiming its A380 as the quietest long-range aircraft in service. The aircraft has received external noise levels validation from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the U.S. FAA.
2008-06-30
Article
Cleaning up the skies by developing a broad span of new green technologies is a massive, challenging, and fascinating opportunity for the aerospace industry. But that is the aim of the Clean Sky European joint technology initiative (JTI), which gets under way this year and is set to become one of the European industry’s largest projects ever.
2008-06-30
Article
Bosch Rexroth is supplying the hydraulic systems to operate the 16 platforms required for two wing jigs for the Airbus A400M multi-role military transport. The aircraft’s wing boxes are 23 m long and 4 m wide, and each has a mass of 3 t. They are believed to be the largest carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic composite wings ever made.
2008-06-30
Article
Boeing and Airbus signed an agreement to work together to ensure global interoperability in air-traffic management as part of an effort to help reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. The companies will seek the acceleration of improvements to the world’s air-transportation management system in order to increase efficiency and eliminate traffic congestion.
2008-06-30
Article
Spirit AeroSystems Inc. signed a contract with Airbus to design and produce a major composite fuselage structure for the A350 XWB (Xtra Wide-Body) program. Spirit will design and manufacture the Section 15 center fuselage frame section, a composite structure approximately 65 ft long, 20 ft wide, and nearly 9000 lb.
2008-06-30
Article
In a contract valued at more than $125 million, Airbus selected B/E Aerospace to supply passenger and crew oxygen systems for the new A350 XWB aircraft. B/E Aerospace’s passenger and crew oxygen systems utilize the company’s patented Pulse system as well as chemical oxygen generation.
2008-06-30
Article
he use of alternative, environmentally compatible power sources for aircraft is moving ahead cautiously. Although full details have not been released, Airbus has confirmed that it had successfully flight-tested a fuel-cell system in an A320 to power backup hydraulic and electric power systems.
2008-06-30
Article
The SA2 machine is the latest in the Low Voltage Electromagnet Riveter (LVER) family of automated fastening equipment from Electroimpact, and it is being used on the Airbus A320 aircraft.
2008-06-30
Article
Airbus selected Rockwell Collins to provide the trimmable horizontal stabilizer actuator (THSA) for the new A350 XWB (extra-wide body) aircraft. The THSA optimizes aerodynamics, responding to complex computations to trim the pitch of the aircraft during flight.
2008-01-17
Article
At November’s Dubai Airshow, Qatar AirwaysQatar Petroleum, Qatar Fuel, Airbus, Rolls-Royce, Shell, and the Qatar Science and Technology Park signed an agreement to research the feasibility and potential benefits of using gas-to-liquid synthetic jet fuels in aviation engines.
2011-09-29
Article
Pratt & Whitney, Japan Aero Engines Corp., and MTU Aero Engines AG will collaborate to provide the PurePower PW1100G-JM engine for the Airbus A320neo program. Under the collaboration agreement, MTU will hold an 18% share and be responsible for the low-pressure turbine and participate jointly with P&W in the high-pressure compressor.
2011-10-20
Article
Due to the conflicting trends of increasing complexity of systems and drastically reduced development times, virtual testing has become one of the solutions to achieve aircraft system certification.
2011-11-03
Article
In the automotive industry, the industrial robot is a common solution to achieve high-speed, repeatable processes. But due to its lack of accuracy and its compliant nature, use of robots has not been as successful in aircraft manufacturing. The use of force control with robots could change that.
2012-05-31
Article
Researchers from Brötje-Automation and Airbus come up with a “versatile” solution.
2012-07-06
Article
Airbus has announced plans to establish a manufacturing facility in the United States to assemble and deliver the family of A319, A320, and A321 aircraft. Located at the Brookley Aeroplex in Mobile, AL, it will be the company's first U.S.
2009-07-20
Article
Goodrich Corp. has opened a new 50,000-ft² facility in China’s Tianjin Airport Industrial Park to support nacelle and thrust reverser original equipment as well as maintenance, repair, and overhaul (MRO) activities.
2009-07-20
Article
Airbus signed an agreement with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency for cooperative research activities in the field of composite materials. This agreement marks the first research cooperation between Airbus and a Japanese aerospace agency.
2009-09-03
Article
Rolls-Royce is set to begin construction at Crosspointe, its new aerospace facility in Prince George County, VA, in late September or early October. This first building at Crosspointe will be a 140,000-ft² disc manufacturing facility.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 159

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