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Viewing 1 to 30 of 87
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1224
Wolfgang Schwitzer, Rolf Schneider, Dominik Reinhardt, Georg Hofstetter
Multicore-based ECUs are increasingly used in embedded automotive software systems to allow more demanding automotive applications at moderate cost and energy consumption. Using a high number of parallel processors together with a high number of executed software components results in a practically unmanageable number of deployment alternatives to choose from. However correct deployment is one important step for reaching timing goals and acceptable latency, both also a must to reach safety goals of safety-relevant automotive applications. In this paper we focus at reducing the complexity of deployment decisions during the phases of allocation and scheduling. We tackle this complexity of deployment decisions by a mixed constructive and analytic approach.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1662
Martin Woltereck, Christoph Jung, Günter Reichart
In this contribution functional safety is discussed from a car manufacturer's point of view. Typical elements of a safety standard concerning safety activities during the product development process are described as well as management and other supporting processes. Emphasis is laid on the aspect of risk assessment and the determination of safety classes. Experiences with methods for safety analysis like FTA or FMEA are discussed and pros and cons of quantitative safety assessment are argued.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1657
Ingo Raasch
In the early stages of conceptual design the available geometric data are very coarse and the lifespan of a design idea is very short. The structural evaluation and improvement of a design has to take both facts into account. Its focus is on the total vehicle and its performance. This can be estimated by a modeling technique, which is adequate for the lack of geometric details. Static and dynamic global stiffness as well as some aspects of crash and NVH have to be considered. Optimization will lead to the proper sizing and some indication of the potential of the structure. In order to maintain high quality standards this approach has to be supported by specialized CAE tools and extensive rules on modeling techniques and analysis procedures.
1999-10-25
Technical Paper
1999-01-3460
P. K. Püffel, W. Thiel, U. Boesl
Fast and exact measurement of engine oil consumption is a very difficult task. Our aim is to achieve this measurement at a common test bed without engine modifications. We resolved this problem with a new technique using Laser Mass Spectrometry to detect appropriate tracers in the raw engine exhaust. The tracers are added to the engine oil. to the engine oil. For detection of these tracers we use a Laser Mass Spectrometer (LAMS). This is a combination of resonant laser ionization (with an all-solid-state laser) and Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. Currently this is the only way to detect oil originated molecules (like our tracers) in the raw exhaust very fast (50 Hz) and sensitive (ppb-region). Thus, engine mapping of oil consumption over load and speed can be performed in 1-2 days with about 90 measurements. Even measurement during dynamic engine operation is possible, but not quantitative (due to the lack of information about dynamic exhaust gas mass flow).
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0810
Michael Würtenberger
How can car manufacturers, which are primary mechanical engineers, become software specialists? This is a question of prime importance for car electronics in the future. Modern vehicles offer a large number of electronic and software based functions to achieve a high level of safety, fuel economy, comfort, entertainment and security which are developed under pressure of regulations, of consumers needs and of competitive time to market aspects. This contribution draws a picture, what could be important in future for in car communication and information system in terms of development process, HW & SW architectures, partnerships in automotive industry and security of industrial properties. For this purpose the automotive development is reviewed and actual examples of system designs are given.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0105
Heinz Leffler, Werner Foag
Integrated Chassis Management ICM is a novel and demanding approach to develop a vehicle chassis and all its control systems in a common process which explicitly addresses the interrelations between them. Primary aims are the improvement of driving safety and comfort by creating synergies in the use of sensor information, hardware, and control strategies. The Electronic Brake Management EBM is an essential part of ICM and an important step to its development.
2011-10-06
Technical Paper
2011-28-0072
Stephan Blum, Norman Henkel, Thomas Lehnhaeuser, Karthik Chittepu
The quality of the paint application in automotive industry depends on several process parameters. Thus, finding an optimal solution based on experimental configuration is tedious and time consuming. A first step to reduce the effort is to model the application within the framework of a simulation environment. In this study, we present an approach for the systematic variation of design parameters of the paint process to quantify their influence on the quality of the paint application. Using that information the design space is reduced by neglecting the parameters with low impact and later used to predict an optimal set of input parameters for an optimal paint application.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1281
Andreas Bauer, Manfred Broy, Jan Romberg, Bernhard Schätz, Peter Braun, Ulrich Freund, Nuria Mata, Robert Sandner, Dirk Ziegenbein
This paper describes the first results from the AutoMoDe project (Automotive Model-based Development), where an integrated methodology for model-based development of automotive control software is being developed. The results presented include a number of problem-oriented graphical notations, based on a formally defined operational model, which are associated with system views for various degrees of abstraction. It is shown how the approach can be used for partitioning comprehensive system designs for subsequent implementation-related tasks. Recent experiences from a case study of an engine management system, specific issues related to reengineering, and the current status of CASE-tool support are also presented.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0228
Jan Deleener, Peter Mas, Luc Cremers, Jeffrey Poland
This paper describes a practical approach to extract the global static stiffness of a body in white (BIW) from dynamic measurements in free-free conditions. Based on a limited set of measured frequency response functions (FRF), the torsional and bending stiffness values are calculated using an FRF based substructuring approach in combination with inverse force identification. A second approach consists of a modal approach whereby the static car body stiffness is deduced from a full free-free modal identification including residual stiffness estimation at the clamping and load positions. As an extra important result this approach allows for evaluating the modal contribution of the flexible car body modes to the global static stiffness values. The methods have been extensively investigated using finite element modeling data and verified on a series of body in white measurements.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0317
Dan Gunnarsson, Matthias Traub, Christian Pigorsch
Timing evaluation methods help to design a robust and extendible E/E architecture (electric/electronic). BMW has introduced the systematic application of such methods in the E/E design process within the last three years. Meanwhile, most of the architectural changes are now verified by a tool-based, automatic real-time analysis. This has increased the accuracy of the network planning and productivity of the BMW network department. In this paper, we give an overview of the actual status of timing evaluations in BMW's E/E architecture design. We discuss acceptance criteria, analysis metrics, and design rules, as far as these are related to timing. We look specifically at automation options, as these improve the productivity further. We will see that timing analysis has matured and should be mandatory for application in mass production E/E architecture development. At the same time, there is room for future improvements.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0104
B. Basara, F. Aldudak, S. Jakirlić, C. Tropea, M. Schrefl, J. Mayer, K. Hanjalić
In the present work we investigated experimentally and computationally the unsteady flow around a BMW car model including wheels*. This simulation yields mean flow and turbulence fields, enabling the study aerodynamic coefficients (drag and lift coefficients, three-dimensional/spatial wall-pressure distribution) as well as some unsteady flow phenomena in the car wake (analysis of the vortex shedding frequency). Comparisons with experimental findings are presented. The computational approach used is based on solving the complete transient Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (TRANS) equations. Special attention is devoted to turbulence modelling and the near-wall treatment of turbulence. The flow calculations were performed using a robust, eddy-viscosity-based ζ - ƒ turbulence model in the framework of the elliptic relaxation concept and in conjunction with the universal wall treatment, combining integration up to the wall and wall functions.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0432
Franz Amaseder, Guenter Krainz
There is a common understanding that hydrogen has a great potential to be the fuel of the future. In addition to the challenge of developing appropriate hydrogen propulsion systems the development of hydrogen storage systems is the second big issue. Due to its high potential in cost and weight and specific storage capacity, the BMW Group is focusing on the development of liquid hydrogen storage systems. In the next hydrogen 7-Series the BMW Group is about to make for the first time the step from demonstration fleets to cars used by external users with a liquid hydrogen storage system. To realize this significant goal, special focus has to be put on high safety standards so that hydrogen can be considered as safe as common types of fuel, and on the every day reliability of the storage system. Moreover, the development of strong partnerships with suppliers is a key factor to realize the design and identify appropriate manufacturing processes.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0431
Gerrit Kiesgen, Manfred Klüting, Christian Bock, Hubert Fischer
Due to its high specific power density, immediate and lively throttle response, good efficiency and life cycles comparable to current powertrain concepts the hydrogen internal combustion engine (H2-ICE) will play a major role in future automotive propulsion systems. The new bi-fuel 12-cylinder hydrogen internal combustion engine for the 7 series is an important step in this direction. In this article engine design and the development of the engine functions of the new H2-12-cylinder will be shown in detail. In particular the engine operation strategy to achieve high efficiencies and very low tail pipe emissions will be presented. Finally potentials of the mono-fuel derivative will be discussed and an outlook for future engine concepts will be given.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1262
Peter E. Pfeffer, D. Nigel Johnston, Matija Sokola, Manfred Harrer
The reduction of fuel consumption in vehicles remains an important target in vehicle development to meet the carbon dioxide emission reduction target. One of the significant consumers of energy in a vehicle is the hydraulic power-assisted steering system (HPS) powered by the engine belt drive. To reduce the energy consumption an electric motor can be used to drive the pump (electro-hydraulic power steering or EHPS). In this work a simulation model was developed and validated to model the energy consumption of the whole steering system. This includes an advanced friction model for the steering rack, a physically modeled steering valve, the hydraulic pump and the electric motor with the control unit. The model is used to investigate the influence of various parameters on the energy consumption for different road situations. The results identified the important parameters influencing the power consumption and showed the potential to reduce the power consumption of the system.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1280
Pavel Kvasnicka, Günther Prokop, Angelika Rettinger, Helmuth Stahl
Handling characteristics, ride comfort and active safety are customer relevant attributes of modern premium vehicles. Electronic control units offer new possibilities to optimize vehicle performance with respect to these goals. The integration of multiple control systems, each with its own focus, leads to a high complexity. BMW and ITK Engineering have created a tool to tackle this challenge. A simulation environment to cover all development stages has been developed. Various levels of complexity are addressed by a scalable simulation model and functionality, which grows step-by-step with increasing requirements. The simulation environment ensures the coherence of the vehicle data and simulation method for development of the electronic systems. The article describes both the process of the electronic control unit (ECU) development and positive impact of an integrated tool on the entire vehicle development process.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-1036
Wolfgang Thiel, Karl Hartmann
Although hydrogen ICE engines have existed in one sort or another for many years, the testing of fuel consumption by way of exhaust emissions is not yet a proven method. The current consumption method for gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles is called the Carbon-Balance method, and it works by testing the vehicle exhaust for all carbon-containing components. Through conservation of mass, the carbon that comes out as exhaust must have gone in as fuel. Just like the Carbon-Balance method for gas and diesel engines, the new Hydrogen-Balance equation works on the principle that what goes into the engine must come out as exhaust components. This allows for fuel consumption measurements without direct contact with the fuel. This means increased accuracy and simplicity. This new method requires some modifications to the testing procedures and CVS (Constant Volume Sampling) system.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-1038
Wolfgang Thiel, Bradley Krough
The development of hydrogen-fueled vehicles has created the need for established fuel consumption testing methods. Until now the EPA has only accepted three methods of hydrogen fuel consumption testing, gravimetric, PVT (stabilized pressure, volume and temperature), and Coriolis mass flow; all of which necessitate physical measurements of the fuel supply [1]. BMW has developed an equation and subsequent testing methods to accurately and effectively determine hydrogen fuel consumption in light-duty vehicles using only exhaust emissions. Known as “Hydrogen-Balance”, the new equation requires no changes to EPA procedures and only slight modifications to most existing chassis dynamometers and CVS (Constant Volume Sampling) systems. The SAE 2008-01-1036, also written by BMW, explains the background as well as required equipment and changes to the CVS testing system. This paper takes hydrogen balance further by testing it against the three EPA established forms of fuel consumption.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-1037
Wolfgang Thiel, Karl Hartmann
The Hydrogen-Balance equation makes it possible to calculate the fuel economy or fuel consumption of hydrogen powered vehicles simply by analyzing exhaust emissions. While the benefits of such a method are apparent, it is important to discuss possible influencing factors that may decrease Hydrogen-Balance accuracy. Measuring vehicle exhaust emissions is done with a CVS (Constant Volume Sampling) system. While the CVS system has proven itself both robust and precise over the years, utilizing it for hydrogen applications requires extra caution to retain measurement accuracy. Consideration should be given to all testing equipment, as well as the vehicle being tested. Certain environmental factors may also play a role not just in Hydrogen-Balance accuracy, but as also in other low emission testing accuracy.
1994-03-01
Technical Paper
940825
Wolfgang Thiel, Walter Hübner, Roland Grisar, Wolfgang J. Riedel, Helmut Wolf
In order to achieve the emission levels required for Low Emission Vehicles (LEV) and Ultra Low Emission Vehicles (ULEV) it is necessary to obtain insight into emission reactions to the motor management systems during transient engine performance. The optimisation of transients in typical driving profiles, such as shifting, acceleration load reversal, necessitates suitable gas measurement equipment. A technique capable to resolve one combustion cycle consists in spectroscopic gas analysis by using tunable infrared diode lasers. This paper describes the available equipment and demonstrates that a diode laser system fulfils the specific demands for the analysis of transient operating characteristics of engine management systems.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
951000
K.-Rainer Deutenbach
The size of the room surrounding the wind tunnel test section, the so called wind tunnel plenum, is always seen as an important parameter of the wind tunnel building, but has rarely been the subject of systematic investigation regarding minimal requirements to meet quality objectives for aerodynamic testing. Experimental investigations of this object were made in a quarter-scale wind tunnel (nozzle area 1.4m2). The plenum dimensions were changeable by combinations of different side wall and ceiling positions. The results have shown, that the plenum can have a significant effect on the flow around the vehicle and therefore on the measured forces. Drag coefficient is under prediced if the wind tunnel plenum is too small. Recommendations are provided for the geometric dimensions of a wind tunnel plenum. The data obtained are a valuable tool for the layout of wind tunnel design concepts and for the evaluation of interference free wind tunnel simulation.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950207
Harald A. Franze, Ulrich Neumann, Rolf Marstrander, Tor Johan Brobak
The environmental impact of the automobile and its components is of growing importance not only in public debates but also in the complex decision making process regarding future car concepts. To calculate the environmental compatibility of car components BMW has developed various quantifying instruments and a holistic Life-Cycle Analysis (LCA) approach. The development phase significantly affects the entire life-cycle of a product. Suitable design criteria, recycling requirements and in-house standards have therefore been developed and established. One of the most important objectives in optimizing the environmental compatibility of the automobile is the realization of intelligent lightweight concepts. This means one has to find the most appropriate solution in terms of ecology and economy. Due to modern development processes car manufacturers and their suppliers have to intensify their cooperation also in this area.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950294
O. Rumpf, A. Gassenhuber
Abstract The increasing complexity of communication protocols for asynchronous multiplex systems requires the use of simulation during the optimisation of these protocols or the integration of other control units. Consideration of realistic communication behaviour of the connected control units is essential for performance analysis of multiplex systems. For a first pass, the use of simple statistical distributions (e.g. Poisson distribution) is suitable to get some simulation results. A better way to get realistic results is the approximation of empirical communication data through the use of more complex statistical distribution (e.g. mixed Erlang distributions). In this paper several approaches for the approximation of empirical data are presented. Beside simple statistical distributions (with one parameter), the use of more complex statistical distributions is discussed and methods for the identification of their parameters are presented.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950291
U. Kiencke, K. J. Neumann, L. Frey, J. Graf, T. Wollstadt, J. Krammer, W. Kremer, F. Lersch, E. Schmidt, J. Minuth, T. Raith, T. Thurner, H. Kuder, V. Wilhelmi, H.-J. Mathony, D. Schäfer-Siebert, R. John, M. Reinfrank, K. Storjohann, C. Hoffmann
The individual development process for distributed, communicating electronic control units hinders the integration of Automotive systems and increases the overall costs. In order to facilitate such applications, services and protocols for Communication, Network Management, and Operating System must be standardized. The aim of the OSEK project is to work out a respective specification proposal in cooperation with several car manufacturers and suppliers. This will permit a cost-effective system integration and support the portation of system functions between different electronic control units.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920344
Rudi Kuenstner, Klaus-Rainer Deutenbach, Jorg-Dieter Vagt
In automotive open-jet wind tunnels reference velocity is usually measured in terms of a static pressure difference between two different cross-sectional areas of the tunnel. Most commonly used are two sections within the nozzle (Method 1: ΔP-Nozzle). Sometimes, the reference velocity is deduced from the static pressure difference between settling chamber and plenum (Method 2: ΔP-Plenum). Investigations in three full-scale open-jet automotive wind tunnels have clearly shown that determination of reference dynamic pressure according to ΔP-Plenum is physically incorrect. Basically, all aerodynamic coefficients, including drag coefficient, obtained by this method are too low. For test objects like cars and vans it was found that the error ΔcD depends on the test object's drag blockage in an open-jet wind tunnel.
1994-09-01
Technical Paper
941658
Gero G. Kempf, Karl Strenzl
1. Abstract The improvement of low-speed MUX-systems in car-body areas gets important in a scenario where on one hand, the possible number of integrated local control units (LCU's) gets larger and on the other hand, the possible versions of a car range from basic to top-of-the-line. Cost and developement time can be reduced if the same MUX-System is used throughout this whole range. A possibility to realize this is the use of data-compression (DC) for data-transmission. Basic configurations integrating only a small number of LCU's of a car-MUX can communicate without using data-compression, whereas for the top-of-the-line versions, the performance can be enhanced using DC only for communication processes between additional control units causing critical peak load situations. Specifically, the use of adaptive algorithms in automotive multiplex systems is a promising way to improve the MUX's capacity performance by minimizing redundant symbols/information in peak-load situations.
1995-10-01
Technical Paper
951847
Klemens Graser, Reinhard Hoock
A lot of very valuable information has already been gained in the process of dismantling, assorting and reconditioning plastic parts on old cars, in reconditioning defective plastic parts from workshops, and in the use of reject parts from production. This know-how is now applied primarily to increase the use of recycled plastics and to optimise the composition and design of future plastic components in the interest of recycling, since further development in these areas is essential in order to establish economically stable material cycles functioning properly in the long term. The present paper describes the most important criteria through which the materials and designs chosen affect the processes and principles of recycling in the case of plastic parts and components.
1994-03-01
Technical Paper
940470
Peter Langen, Mario Theissen, Josef Mallog, Rudolf Zielinski
Apart from the reduction of engine-out emissions from the powerplant, the development of an efficient and reliable catalytic converter heating system is an important task of automotive engineering in the future to meet standards that will require reduction of cold start emissions. Carrying out a comprehensive study in this field, BMW has tested and evaluated possible solutions to this challenge. In additon to the electrically heated catalytic converter (E-cat) and the afterburner chamber, an incorporated burner system would meet the requirement for fast catalyst light-off in the future, particularly in the case of larger engines.
1990-02-01
Technical Paper
900209
H. J. Kraft, H. Leffler
SUMMARY The first part of the paper describes the brake system of the BMW 850i including brake actuation, brake split and ABS. ABS control philosophy and components are presented as well as performance date are shown. The BMW 850i will be available with two Automatic Stability Control systems ASC und ASC+T which are explained more in detail. Special attention is payed to the electronic and hydraulic interfacing of the different sub-systems required for ABS and ASC.
1996-02-01
Technical Paper
960404
Klaus Vornberger, Marcus Essenpreis
BMW's concept for recycling old cars seeks to avoid shredder residues in the recycling process to the greatest possible extent. Any absolutely unavoidable, non-utilizable residues are to be suitable for disposal at domestic waste sites. An important feature of this recycling concept is the removal of operating fluids and dismantling of any components, parts and materials worthy of further use from old cars. This corporate policy, supported by legal standards calls for the automobile recycler to meet increasing demands in terms of facilities and equipment as internal processes. Proper fulfilment of these requirements is indeed a fundamental prerequisite for companies wishing to be accepted within the network of recycling plants. Like the production of vehicles, the subsequent utilisation and recycling of vehicles must be considered in the light of economic criteria.
1996-02-01
Technical Paper
960349
Franz-Josef Hanel, Erhard Otto, Rolf Brück
Abstract The production of the BMW ALPINA B12 5.7 with Switch-Tronic transmission provides the markets of Europe and Japan with an exclusive, luxury-orientated, high performance limited series limousine. This is the first vehicle worldwide to be fitted with the progressive exhaust gas aftertreatment technology known as the Electrically Heated Catalyst (EHC), in which the effectiveness of the power utilized is increased significantly by an alternating heating process for both catalytic converters. Only since this achievement has the implementation of the EHC been viable without extensive modification to the battery and alternator. With this exhaust gas aftertreatment concept, the emissions of this high performance vehicle will fall to less than half the maximum permissible for compliance with 1996 emission standards.
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