Criteria

Text:
Affiliation:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 3 of 3
1993-03-01
Technical Paper
930499
Y.-G. Lai, A. J. Przekwas, R. L. T. Sun
An advanced multi-domain CFD analysis approach is proposed to calculate the scavenging flow process in motored two-stroke engines. An implicit and conservative treatment at the domain interface is developed which offers significant speedup in convergence. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian approach for moving grid and a grid remeshing technique for grid sliding at engine cylinder/transfer ports interfaces are used for efficiency and accuracy. A three-dimensional simulation of the Mercury Marine research two-stroke engine is carried out to demonstrate the approach. Six computational domains are used which naturally represent the geometries of the cylinder, engine dome, exhaust and transfer ports. The influence of boost port inclination angle on the scavenging process of the two-stroke engine is also studied numerically. The computation is supplemented with a standard two-equation turbulence model with compressibility correction.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640418
G. DeClaire, A. H. Bell
General laboratory and testing procedures employed by the Chrysler Corporation in the development of its automotive gas turbine powerplant are discussed, with particular emphasis on facilities, instrumentation requirements, component fixtures, and complete powerplant tests. Some specific development problems and their solutions are presented along with some performance test results.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640417
Amedee Roy, Frederick A. Hagen, Claude Belleau
Both conventional and newly developed materials used in unique applications have played an important role in making the Chrysler gas turbine engine a practical powerplant. The new low-cost materials developed by Chrysler Metallurgical Research include, (a) a series of iron-base super alloys having equivalent or superior life to aircraft type alloys, (b) heat resisting iron aluminum alloys for elevated temperature service under low stress application, and (c) long life rubbing seal materials that operate satisfactorily from ambient temperature up to 1200°F and above. These materials appear to meet all present or immediate high temperature alloy requirements for a competitive mass produced automotive turbine.
Viewing 1 to 3 of 3