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Viewing 1 to 30 of 93
1989-11-01
Technical Paper
892466
Reda M. Bata, Alvon C. Elrod, Richard W. Rice, Mohamed M. Elkoth
Experimental evaluations were made of single- and double-pass heat exchangers for automotive application. The study was concerned primarily with the effect of the working parameters, air and water mass flow rates and the inlet water temperature, on the average and local heat transfer coefficients. An automotive radiator having two water-side passes was fabricated and tested. The experimental results were compared with those for a single-pass unit. The study showed that the overall coefficient of heat transfer of the single-pass radiator was higher than that of the double-pass radiator.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0428
Essam Z. Namouz, Laine Mears, Gregory Mocko, Joshua Summers
A new approach to lightweight engineering of vehicles focuses on identifying and eliminating Lazy Parts through the application of the Lazy Parts Indication Method (LPIM). In this context, Lazy Parts are defined as components that have the potential for mass reduction for a number of reasons discussed in previous literature. The focus of this research is to apply the LPIM to an automotive component, identify potential mass savings, and redesign the component to address the laziness and begin to validate the LPIM as well at the estimated mass savings. A generator mounting bracket for a vehicle is analyzed using the LPIM and redesigned. The application of the LPIM to the generator mounting bracket predicted an estimated mass savings of 10% (0.32kg), while the actual redesign of the bracket revealed a 12% (0.38kg) mass savings.
2005-07-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2884
Jones Muller, Jay Ochterbeck, Jeffrey Perez, Paul Rogers
The current work addresses efforts to characterize multiple-evaporator capillary pumped loops. Both experimental and analytical approaches were used to predict performance of parallel evaporators and corresponding effects from adjacent operating evaporators. The effects of low and high power dissipation and the distribution of powers among the evaporators were tested. Additionally, a pressure balance model is given where the maximum heat transfer capacity for an evaporator operating under a multi-evaporator condition is determined based on pressure distribution throughout the loop. The model and experiment comparisons demonstrated how the heat load distribution among evaporators affects the maximum capillary limit for individual evaporators operating in a multiple evaporator mode.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0765
Beshoy Morkos, Joshua David Summers, James Mathieson, Jaret Matthews
This paper entails the design and development of a NASA testing system used to simulate wheel operation in a lunar environment under different loading conditions. The test system was developed to test the design of advanced nonpneumatic wheels to be used on the NASA All-Terrain Hex-Legged Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE). The ATHLETE, allowing for easy maneuverability around the lunar surface, provides the capability for many research and exploration opportunities on the lunar surface that were not previously possible. Each leg, having six degrees of freedom, allows the ATHLETE to accomplish many tasks not available on other extra-terrestrial exploration platforms. The robotic vehicle is expected to last longer than previous lunar rovers.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0096
John Limroth, Thomas Kurfess
This paper presents a methodology for designing a simple open-loop steering robot profile to simulate a double lane change maneuver for track testing of a heavy tractor/trailer combination vehicle. For track testing of vehicles in a lane change type of maneuver, a human driver is typically used with a desired path defined with visual cues such as traffic cones. Such tests have been shown to result in poor test repeatability due to natural variation in driver steering behavior. While a steering robot may be used to overcome this repeatability issue, such a robot typically implements open-loop maneuvers and cannot be guaranteed to cause the vehicle to accurately follow a pre-determined trajectory. This paper presents a method using offline simulation to design an open-loop steering maneuver resulting in a realistic approximation of a double lane change maneuver.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1802
Bashar Alzuwayer, Mahmoud Abdelhamid, Pierluigi Pisu, Pietro Giovenco, Paul Venhovens
Predicting fuel economy during early stages of concept development or feasibility study for a new type of powertrain configuration is an important key factor that might affect the powertrain configuration decision to meet CAFE standards. In this paper an efficient model has been built in order to evaluate the fuel economy for a new type of charge sustaining series hybrid vehicle that uses a Genset assembly (small 2 cylinders CNG fueled engine coupled with a generator). A first order mathematical model for a Li-Ion polymer battery is presented based on actual charging /discharging datasheet. Since the Genset performance data is not available, normalized engine variables method is used to create powertrain performance maps. An Equivalent Consumption Minimization Strategy (ECMS) has been implemented to determine how much power is supplied to the electric motor from the battery and the Genset.
2013-05-15
Journal Article
2013-01-9018
AbdelRaouf Mayyas, Robert Prucka, Pierluigi Pisu, Imtiaz Haque
This manuscript provides a review of different types and categorization of the chassis dynamometer systems. The review classifies the chassis dynamometers based on the configuration, type of rollers and the application type. Additionally the manuscript discusses several application examples of the chassis dynamometer including: performance and endurance mileage accumulation tests, fuel efficiency and exhaust emissions, noise, vibration and harshness testing (NVH). Different types of the vehicle attachment system in the dynamometer cell and its influences on the driving force characteristics and the vehicle acoustic signature is also discussed. The text also highlights the impact of the use of the chassis dynamometer as a development platform and its impact on the development process. Examples of using chassis dynamometer as a development platform using Vehicle Hardware In-the-Loop (VHiL) approach including drivability assessment and transmission calibrations are presented.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0620
Lance Clark, John R. Wagner, Kim Alexander, Philip Pidgeon
Barriers are commonly used on roadways to separate and to protect against vehicles traveling in opposing directions from possible head-on collisions. However, these barriers may interfere with wildlife passage such that animals become trapped on the road. Typically, small animals cannot find safe passage across all traffic lanes due to the presence of solid barriers and eventually die after being hit by a vehicle. The occurrence of animal-to-vehicle collisions also presents a dangerous scenario for motorists as a driver may intuitively swerve to avoid hitting the animal. In this paper, a redesigned Jersey style barrier, named the Clemson smart portal, will be presented and discussed. This roadway barrier features a portal for small animal travel, along with a mechatronic-based warning system to notify drivers of animal passage.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1260
Paul Freeman, Sameer Samant, John R. Wagner, Kim Alexander, Philip Pidgeon
Despite the growing acceptance of driver education programs, there remains a class of unpredictable and dangerous vehicle situations for which very little training or education is offered. Included in this list is a condition called run-off-the-road (ROR) which occurs when the wheels of the vehicle leave the paved surface of the road and begin to travel on the lower friction surfaces of the shoulder or side of the road. Unsuccessful recovery from ROR contributes to an overwhelming percentage of motorized vehicle crash fatalities and injuries. Most present solutions involve roadway infrastructure management and driver assistance systems. While these solutions have contributed varying amounts of success to the ROR problem, they remain limited as they do not directly address the critical cause of ROR crashes which is driver performance errors.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1407
Qimin (Jimmy) Yao, John R. Wagner, Kim Alexander, Philip Pidgeon
Novice drivers are often ill-equipped to safely operate a motor vehicle due to their limited repertoire of skills and experiences. However, automotive simulation tools can be applied to better educate young drivers for a number of common driving scenarios. In this paper, the Clemson Automotive Training System (CATS) will be presented to educate and train novice drivers to safely operate four wheel passenger vehicles on paved roadways. A portable automotive simulator can be programmed to emulate a variety of high-crash rate scenarios and roadway geometries. Drivers receive instructions regarding proper driving techniques and behaviors with an opportunity to practice the given vehicle maneuver. An on-line evaluation methodology has been designed to analyze the drivers' capabilities at handling these roadway events. First, a pre-simulation questionnaire evaluates their basic understanding of everyday driving situations.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1733
Kevin Zaseck, Aristotelis Babajimopoulos, Matthew Brusstar, Zoran Filipi, Dennis N. Assanis
This paper introduces a Hydraulic Linear Engine (HLE) concept and describes a model to simulate instantaneous engine behavior. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has developed an HLE prototype as an evolution of their previous six-cylinder, four-stroke, free-piston engine (FPE) hardware. The HLE design extracts work hydraulically, in a fashion identical to the initial FPE, and is intended for use in a series hydraulic hybrid vehicle. Unlike the FPE, however, the HLE utilizes a crank for improved timing control and increased robustness. Preliminary experimental results show significant speed fluctuations and cylinder imbalance that require careful controls design. This paper also introduces a model of the HLE that exhibits similar behavior, making it an indispensible tool for controls design. Further, the model's behavior is evaluated over a range of operating conditions currently unobtainable by the experimental setup.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0101
Akshay Narasimhan, John Ziegert, Lonny Thompson
The Michelin Tweel tire structure has recently been developed as an innovative non-pneumatic tire which has potential for improved handling, grip, comfort, low energy loss when impacting obstacles and reduced rolling resistance when compared to a traditional pneumatic tire. One of the potential sources of vibration during rolling of a non-pneumatic tire is the buckling phenomenon and snapping back of the spokes in tension when they enter and exit the contact zone. Another source of noise was hypothesized due to a flower petal ring vibration effect due to discrete spoke interaction with the ring and contact with the ground during rolling as the spokes cycle between tension and compression. Transmission of vibration between the ground force, ring and spokes to the hub was also considered to be a significant contributor to vibration and noise characteristics of the Tweel.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0268
Jeffery R. Anderson, E. Harry Law
Traditional Electronic Stability Control (ESC) for automobiles is usually accomplished through the use of estimated vehicle dynamics from simplified models that rely on parameters such as cornering stiffness that can change with the vehicle state and time. This paper proposes a different method for electronic stability control of oversteer by predicting the degree of instability in a vehicle. The algorithm is solely based on measurable response characteristics including lateral acceleration, yaw rate, speed, and driver steering input. These signals are appropriately conditioned and evaluated with fuzzy logic to determine the degree of instability present. When the “degree of instability” passes a certain threshold, the appropriate control action is applied to the vehicle in the form of differential yaw braking. Using only the measured response of the vehicle alleviates the problem of degraded performance when vehicle parameters change.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0441
Lance Clark, Philip Pidgeon, Kim Alexander, Ken Rogich, John R. Wagner, Matthew Jensen
A safe driver program has been established through a public-private partnership. This program targets novice drivers and uses a combination of classroom and in-vehicle training exercises to address critical driver errors known to lead to crashes. Students participate in four modules: braking to learn proper stopping technique, obstacle avoidance / reaction time to facilitate proper lane selection and collision avoidance, tailgating to learn about following distances, and loss of control to react appropriately when a vehicle is about to become laterally unstable. Knowledge pre and posttests are also administered at the start and end of the program. Students' in-vehicle driving performance are evaluated by instructors as well as recorded by onboard data acquisition units. The data has been evaluated with objective and subjective grading rubrics. The 70 participants in three classes used as a case study achieved an average skill score of 83.93/100.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
981025
Yingjin Cui, Wenyu Pan, James H. Leylek, Randall G. Sommer, Sunil K. Jain
Abstract Very large scale, 3D, viscous, turbulent flow simulations, involving 840,000 finite volume cells and the complete form of the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations, were conducted to study the mechanisms responsible for total pressure losses in the entire intake system (inlet duct, plenum, ports, valves, and cylinder) of a straight-six diesel engine. A unique feature of this paper is the inclusion of physical mechanisms responsible for cylinder-to-cylinder variation of flows between different cylinders, namely, the end-cylinder (#1) and the middle cylinder (#3) that is in-line with the inlet duct. Present results are compared with cylinder #2 simulations documented in a recent paper by the Clemson group, Taylor, et al. (1997). A validated comprehensive computational methodology was used to generate grid independent and fully convergent results.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
981026
William Taylor, James H. Leylek, Randall G. Sommer, Sunil K. Jain
Abstract Computational fluid dynamics methods are applied to the intake regions of a diesel engine in the design stage at Caterpillar. Using a complete, tested and validated computational methodology, fully viscous 3-D turbulent flow simulations are performed for three valve lifts, with the goal of identifying and understanding the physics underlying loss in the intake regions of IC engines. The results of these simulations lead to several design improvements in the intake region. These improvements are made to the computational domain, and flow simulations are again performed at three different valve lifts. Improvements in overall total pressure loss of between 5% and 33% are found in the computed results between the original and modified (improved) domains. Physical mechanisms responsible for these improvements are documented in detail.
2006-07-17
Technical Paper
2006-01-2236
Luis A. Trevino, Grant Bue, Evelyne Orndoff, Matt Kesterson, John W. Connell, Joseph G. Smith, Robin E. Southward, Dennis Working, Kent A. Watson, Donavon M. Delozier, Thomas Clancy, Sayata Ghose, Ya-Ping Sun, Yi Lin
This paper describes the effort and accomplishments for developing flexible fabrics with high thermal conductivity (FFHTC) for spacesuits to improve thermal performance, lower weight and reduce complexity. Commercial and additional space exploration applications that require substantial performance enhancements in removal and transport of heat away from equipment as well as from the human body can benefit from this technology. Improvements in thermal conductivity were achieved through the use of modified polymers containing thermally conductive additives. The objective of the FFHTC effort is to significantly improve the thermal conductivity of the liquid cooled ventilation garment by improving the thermal conductivity of the subcomponents (i.e., fabric and plastic tubes).
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1232
John H. Chastain, John R. Wagner
Advanced engine cooling systems can enhance the combustion environment, increase fuel efficiency, and reduce tailpipe emissions with less parasitic engine load. The introduction of computer controlled electro-mechanical valves, radiator fans, and coolant pumps require mathematic models and real time algorithms to implement intelligent thermal control strategies for prescribed engine temperature tracking. Smart butterfly valves can replace the traditional wax-based thermostat to control the coolant flow based on both engine temperature and operating conditions. The electric water pump and radiator fan replace the mechanically driven components to reduce unnecessary engine loads at high speeds and provide better cooling at low speeds.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1592
Yaling Ma, Adrian M. Mistreanu, J. Logan Marshall, James H. Leylek
Part V of this five-part paper investigates the flow field and the total pressure loss mechanisms for three valve lifts in the exhaust region of a V8 racecar engine using the robust, systematic computational methodology described in Part I. The replica of the engine geometry includes a cylinder, detailed combustion chamber, exhaust valve, valve seat, port, and “exhaust pipe”. A set of fully-converged and grid-independent solutions for the steady, time-averaged (or RANS), non-linear Navier-Stokes equations are obtained using dense and high quality grids, involving 2.1∼3.0 finite volumes, and unusually strict convergence criteria. Turbulence closure is attained via the realizable k-ε (RKE) model used in conjunction with the non-equilibrium wall function near-wall treatment. The validation presented in Part I showed that flow rate results from the “blind simulations” agree well with the experimental measurements.
2005-11-01
Technical Paper
2005-01-3518
Eric F. Johnson, E. H. Law, Robert C. Lawson, Ibrahim Janajreh
Understanding the parameters which influence the tendency for a heavy truck to exhibit rollover is of paramount importance to the trucking industry. Multiple parameters influence the vehicle’s motion, and the ability to determine how each affects the vehicle as a system would be an indispensable tool for the design of such vehicles. To be able to perform such predictions and analysis, models and a computer simulation were created to allow the examination of changes in design parameters in such vehicles. The vehicle model was originally developed by Law [1] and presented in Law and Janajreh [2]. The model was extended further by Lawson [3, 4] to include (a) the effects of the torsional compliance of both the tractor and trailer, and (b) tanker trailers with various levels of liquid fill. In the present paper, both the tractor and trailer compliances were studied independently to determine their influences on the rollover stability of the vehicle.
2006-10-31
Technical Paper
2006-01-3569
Joshua B. Stewart, E. Harry Law
Current military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan are unique because the battlefield can be described as a non-linear, asymmetrical environment. Units operate in zones that are susceptible to enemy contact from any direction at any time. The response to these issues has been the addition of add-on armor to HMMWV's and other tactical vehicles. The retro-fitting of armor to these vehicles has resulted in many accidents due to rollover and instability. The goal of this paper is to determine possible causes of the instability and rollover of up-armored tactical vehicles and to develop simulation tools that can analyze the steady-state and transient dynamics of the vehicles. Models and simulations include a steady-state rollover scenario, analysis of understeer gradient, and a transient handling analysis that uses models of both a human driver and a vehicle to analyze vehicle response to an obstacle avoidance maneuver.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1739
E. H. Law, Ibrahim Janajreh
Understanding the effects of tire and vehicle properties on the rollover propensity of tractor semi-trailer trucks is essential. The major objective of the project described by this paper was to develop a simplified computational tool that can be used to understand and predict the effects of various tire characteristics and truck design parameters on rollover under steady cornering and non-tripped conditions. In particular, this tool may be used to help understand the basic mechanisms governing rollover propensity of trucks equipped with New Generation Wide Single tires as contrasted with conventional tires. Effects of tire flexibility, roll-compliant suspensions, fifth - wheel lash and nonlinear suspension characteristics are included in the model and are presented below. Design parameter data used as input to the model were obtained from Michelin Americas Research and Development Corporation.
2004-10-26
Technical Paper
2004-01-2690
Robert C. Lawson, E. H. Law, Ibrahim Janajreh
Decreasing the propensity for rollover during steady state cornering of tractor semi-trailers is a key advantage to the trucking industry. This will be referred to as “increasing the lateral stability during steady state cornering” and may be accomplished by changes in design and loading variables which influence the behavior of a vehicle. To better understand the effects of such changes, a computer program was written to optimize certain design variables and thus maximize the lateral acceleration where an incipient loss of lateral stability occurs. The vehicle model used in the present investigation extends that developed by Law [1] and presented in Law and Janajreh [2]. The original model included the effects of tire flexibility, nonlinear roll-compliant suspensions, and fifth wheel lash. This model was modified to include (a) additional effects of displacement due to both lateral and vertical tire flexibility, and (b) provisions for determining “off-tracking”.
2004-10-26
Technical Paper
2004-01-2622
C. Trangsrud, E. H. Law, I. Janajreh
An investigation of the vertical dynamics of a tractor semi-trailer traversing a random road profile was conducted. This paper presents the development of a 14 degree-of-freedom (DOF), dynamic ride model of a tractor semi-trailer. It is based on work previously conducted by Vaduri and Law [1] and Law et al [2]. The DOFs include: (a) vertical displacements of each of the five axles, the tractor frame, the engine on its mounts, the cab on its suspension, and the driver's seat; (b) pitch displacements of the trailer with respect to the tractor, the cab, and the rigid tractor frame; and, (c) the first bending or beaming modes of the tractor and trailer frames. The model also incorporates suspension friction, and tire non-uniformities. The simulation of the model is conducted using MATLAB software.
2004-08-23
Technical Paper
2004-40-0011
Nilabh Srivastava, Imtiaz-ul Haque
Continuously variable transmissions (CVT) offer a continuum of gear ratios between desired limits. The present research focuses on developing models to understand the microslip behavior and to define an operating regime of a metal pushing V-belt CVT. Slip is modeled on the basis of gap redistribution between the elements. Studies were conducted to observe the influence of loading conditions (i.e. axial forces and torques) on the slip behavior and torque transmitting ability of the CVT. The model also investigates the range of axial forces needed to initiate the transmission and to successfully meet the load requirements. The mathematical model and the results corresponding to different loading scenarios are discussed.
2004-11-30
Technical Paper
2004-01-3509
Jamie L. Morales, E. Harry Law
This paper describes the development of a simplified model and simulation of a stock car subjected to both steady and random winds on a super speedway. Results indicate how lap times are affected by design and operational parameters and by winds. The simulation models a super speedway such as Talladega or Daytona. Inputs to the simulation include wind speed, wind direction, speed of wind gusts, and the duration and frequency of wind gusts. The program will output both total elapsed time and segregated times per each track section. Also, along with elapsed times, the output will include other characteristics pertaining to the performance of the car that allow the user to obtain a basic understanding of the general performance of the car. This paper will show how the car was modeled. Results for both head winds and crosswinds are shown.
2004-11-30
Technical Paper
2004-01-3541
Haipeng Li, Richard S. Figliola
In this study, an automotive cooling system of the engine was analyzed using an exergy-based approach. The goal was to minimize the exergy destroyed by reducing the entropy generated and by minimizing the parasitic power loss. By running a two-objective optimization using a genetic algorithm within a certain range of water flow rate, a series of Pareto curves were obtained. At each speed there exists an optimal water flow rate that corresponds to the minimum consumed power and is close to a minimum in exergy destroyed. We show how an exergy method can yield operating conditions and design parameter values to reduce parasitic power losses.
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2449
Richard Barido, Allen MacKnight, Orlando Rodriguez, Peter Heppel, Robert Lerner, Christine Jarvis, Kriss Kennedy, Luis Trevino
The advanced inflatable airlock (AIA) system was developed for the Space Launch Initiative (SLI). The objective of the AIA system is to greatly reduce the cost associated with performing extravehicular activity (EVA) from manned launch vehicles by reducing launch weight and volume from previous hard airlock systems such as the Space Shuttle and Space Station airlocks. The AIA system builds upon previous technology from the TransHab inflatable structures project, from Space Shuttle and Space Station Airlock systems, and from terrestrial flexible structures projects. The AIA system design is required to be versatile and capable of modification to fit any platform or vehicle needing EVA capability. During the basic phase of the program, the AIA conceptual design and key features were developed to help meet the SLI program goals of reduced cost and program risk.
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2444
M. Reddig, K. Tanaka, A. Hargens, P. Webb, C. Jarvis
The first concept and early experiments of a mechanical counter pressure (MCP) spacesuit were published by Webb in the late 1960's. MCP provides an alternative approach to the conventional full pressure suit that bears some significant advantages, such as increased mobility, dexterity, and tactility. The presented ongoing research provides a thorough investigation of the physiological effect of mechanical counter pressure applied onto the human skin. In this study, we investigated local microcirculatory effects produced with negative and positive ambient pressure on the lower body as a preliminary study for a lower body garment. The data indicates that the positive pressure was less tolerable than negative pressure. Lower body negative and positive pressure cause various responses in skin blood flow due to not only blood shifts but also direct exposure to pressure differentials.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0048
John F. Eberth, John R. Wagner, Brian A. Afshar, Randy C. Foster
The functionality and performance of an internal combustion (spark or compression ignition) engine's thermal management system can be significantly enhanced through the application of mechatronics technology. The replacement of the conventional thermostat valve and mechanical coolant pump in the heating/cooling system by a servo-motor driven smart valve and variable flow pump permits powertrain control module regulated coolant flow through the engine block and radiator. In this paper, a dynamic mathematical model will be created for a 4.6L spark ignition engine to analyze various thermal management system architectures. The designs to be studied include the factory configuration, a smart valve upgrade, and the smart valve combined with a variable flow pump and radiator fan. Representative results are presented and discussed to demonstrate improvements in the engine warm-up time, temperature tracking, and component power consumption.
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