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Viewing 1 to 30 of 57
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0522
Joy A. Hines, Robert C. McCune, John E. Allison, Bob R. Powell, Larry J. Ouimet, William L. Miller, Randy Beals, Lawrence Kopka, Peter P. Ried
Over the past five years, the US Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) has brought together representatives from DaimlerChrysler, General Motors, Ford Motor Company and over 40 other participant companies from the Mg casting industry to create and test a low-cost, Mg-alloy engine that would achieve a 15 - 20 % Mg component weight savings with no compromise in performance or durability. The block, oil pan, and front cover were redesigned to take advantage of the properties of both high-pressure die cast (HPDC) and sand cast Mg creep- resistant alloys. This paper describes the alloy selection process and the casting and testing of these new Mg-variant components. This paper will also examine the lessons learned and implications of this pre-competitive technology for future applications.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0523
Stephen Logan, Al Kizyma, Craig Patterson, Suresh Rama
This paper describes a lightweight magnesium intensive automobile body structure concept developed at DaimlerChrysler to support a high fuel-efficiency vehicle project. This body structure resulted in more than 40% weight reduction over a conventional steel structure while achieving significantly improved structural performance as evaluated through CAE simulations. A business case analysis was conducted and showed promising results. One concept vehicle was built for the purpose of demonstrating concept feasibility. The paper also identifies areas for further development to enable such a vehicle to become a production reality at a later time.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0349
Jin Wu, Dajun Zhou, Li Zhang, YongJun Zhou, Chang Q. Du, Ming F. Shi
Studies in an Angular Stretch Bend Test (ASBT) have demonstrated that the failure location moves from the side wall to punch nose area. This occurs as the R/T ratio decreases below a certain limit and applies to most low carbon steels with the exception of Dual Phase (DP) steels. Such behavior in DP steels indicates that bending effects have a severe impact on the formability of DP materials. Therefore, the traditional criterion using the forming limit curve (FLC) is not suitable to assess the formability at punch radius areas for DP steels due in part to its uniqueness of unconventional microstructures. In this paper, a new failure criterion, ‘Bending-modified’ FLC (BFLC), is proposed by extending the traditional FLC using the “Stretch Bendability Index” (SBI) concept for the stretch bendability assessment.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1906
Paul V. Spiteri, Yung-Li Lee, Ray Segar
This report explores the relationship of different failure criteria - specifically, surface cracks, stiffness changes, and two-piece failures - on rolled, ductile, cast-iron crankshafts. Crankshaft samples were closely monitored throughout resonant bending fatigue testing and were taken to near complete fracture. By monitoring resonance shifts of the samples during testing, stiffness changes and cracks were monitored. These data showed that an accelerating frequency shift was sufficient to indicate imminent two-piece failure and that this condition can be used as a failure criterion. Fatigue studies on two different crankshafts using this failure criterion were compared to those using a surface crack failure criterion. This comparison showed that using the surface crack failure criterion erroneously decreased the apparent fatigue life of the crankshaft significantly.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0994
Uday Prasade, Sudhakar Medepalli, Daniel Moore, Rajesh N. Rao
Knowledge of the loads experienced by a leaf spring suspension is required for the optimal design of the suspension components and frame. The most common method of representing leaf springs is the SAE 3 link model, which does not give good results in the lateral direction. In this paper, a beam element leaf spring model is developed. This model is validated using data obtained from laboratory tests done on leaf spring assemblies. The model is then subjected to actual road load data measured on the Proving Ground. Lastly, results from the beam element model are presented and compared with results obtained from proving ground tests. Overall, the beam element model gives good results in all directions except in situations where it is subjected to high fore/aft acceleration and high reverse braking events.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0991
Xiaobo Yang, Dajun Zhang, Sudhakar Medepalli, Mohammed Malik
In this paper, a comprehensive evaluation index for impact harshness (IH) is proposed. A mid-sized uni-body SUV is selected for this study, with the acceleration responses at the various vehicle body locations as objective functions. A sensitivity study is conducted using an ADAMS full vehicle model with flexible body structure representation over an IH event to analyze the influence of various suspension tuning parameters, including suspension springs, shock damping, steer gear ratio, unsprung mass, track-width, and bushing stiffness.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1257
Cheng Cao, Sudhakar Medepalli
Accurate motion prediction can be used to evaluate vibrations at seat track and steering wheel. This paper presents the prediction and correlation of truck frame motion from wheel force transducer (WFT) measurements. It is assumed that the method can be used to predict vibrations at seat track and steering wheel for unibody vehicles. Two durability events were used for calculation. WFT measurements were used as inputs applied on frame from suspension. Frame loads were then used as inputs to calculate frame motions using a FEA approach. The predicted frame motions are represented by four exhaust hangers and they are compared with measured motions of the same locations. The correlations include displacement, velocity, and acceleration. It is shown that good correlations are obtained in velocity and displacement. Acceleration shows bigger differences than velocity and displacement.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1258
Cheng Cao, Tana Tjhung, Julie Yi Zhu, Mark Villaire, Sudhakar Medepalli
Exhaust durability is an important measure of quality, which can be predicted using CAE with accurate mount loads. This paper proposes an innovative method to calculate these loads from measured mount accelerations. A Chrysler vehicle was instrumented with accelerometers at both ends of its four exhaust mounts. The vehicle was tested at various durability routes or events at DaimlerChrysler Proving Grounds. These measured accelerations were integrated to obtain their velocities and displacements. The differences in velocities and displacements at each mount were multiplied by its damping and stiffness rates to obtain the mount load. The calculation was conducted for all three translational directions and for all events. The calculated mount loads are shown within reasonable range. Along with CAE, it is suggested to explore this method for exhaust durability development.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1620
Rajesh K. Patel, Paul V. Spiteri
In this report, the DCX Stress Lab and the Tool Development & Test Support groups investigated automating a resonant bending crankshaft fatigue test. Fatigue testing, in general, is a laborious process since many samples are needed for analysis. This makes development cost and speed dependant on the component test efficiency. In the case of crankshaft resonant bending testing, both cost and speed are influenced by the manual feedback operation needed to run the current procedure. In order to increase the efficiency of this process, this project sought to automate the following tasks: maintaining the load on the part, reacting to resonance changes in the part, mapping resonance changes, logging the number of cycles, and discerning resonance frequency shift failure modes objectively.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3236
Amer A. Amer, Lurun Zhong
Accurate accounting for fresh charge (fuel and air) along with trapped RGF is essential for the subsequent thermodynamic analysis of combustion in gasoline engines as well as for on-line and real-time quantification as relevant to engine calibration and control. Cost and complexity of such techniques renders direct measurement of RGF impractical for running engines. In this paper, an empirically-based approach is proposed for on-line RGF, based on an existing semi-empirical model [1]. The model developed expands the range over which the semi-empirical model is valid and further improves its accuracy. The model was rigorously validated against a well correlated GT-POWER model as well as results from 1D gas exchange model [2]. Overall, using this model, RGF estimation error was within ∼1.5% for a wide range of engine operating conditions. The model will be implemented in Dyno development and calibration at Chrysler Group.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0421
Z. C. Yao, L. Zhang, S. Kariat, Y. J. Zhou
Tailor welded steel blanks have long been applied in stamping of automotive parts such as door inner, b-pillar, rail, sill inner and liftgate inner, etc. However, there are few known tailor welded aluminum blanks in production. Traditional laser welding equipment simply does not have the capability to weld aluminum since aluminum has much higher reflectivity than steel. Welding quality is another issue since aluminum is highly susceptible to pin holes and undercut which leads to deterioration in formability. In addition, high amount of springback for aluminum panels can result in dimension control problem during assembly. A tailor-welded aluminum blank can help reducing dimension variability by reducing the need for assembly. In this paper, application of friction stir and plasma arc welded blanks on a liftgate inner will be discussed.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1581
Mike Guo, Ram Bhandarkar, Barry Lin
Loads generated during assembly may cause significant stress levels in components. Under test conditions, these stresses alter the mean stress which in turn, alters the fatigue life and critical stress area of the components as well. This paper describes the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) procedure to evaluate behavior of a cast aluminum wheel subjected to the rotary fatigue test condition as specified in the SAE test procedure (SAE J328 JUN94). Fatigue life of the wheel is determined using the S-N approach for a constant reversed loading condition. In addition, fatigue life predictions with and without clamp loads are compared. It is concluded that the inclusion of clamp load is necessary for better prediction of the critical stress areas and fatigue life of the wheel.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1003
Mahesh Tampi, Xiaobo Yang, Gu Zhengqi, Li Weiping
In this paper, cradle design functional objectives are briefly reviewed and a durability development process is proposed focusing on the cradle loads, stress, strain, and fatigue life analysis. Based upon the proposed design process, sample isolated and non-isolated cradle finite element (FE) models for a uni-body sport utility vehicle (SUV) under different design phases are solved and correlated with laboratory bench and proving ground tests. The correlation results show that the applied cradle models can be used to accurately predict the critical stress spots and fatigue life under various loading conditions.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1000
Gopal Musale, Reza Keshtkar
Regulations implemented by safety commissions throughout the world have resulted in extensive physical testing to protect the occupants during frontal impact events. Significant prototype and test costs aimed at optimizing structure and restraint systems are associated with meeting these regulations. To help reduce development costs, Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) is often applied. LS-DYNA [1] coupled with MADYMO [2] is widely used in crash and occupant safety simulation. An analysis technique which utilized a single model to design and optimize interiors (instrument panel, seats, visor, steering wheel, steering column) and restraints (airbag, seatbelts, retractor, pre-tensioner) was developed. The single model concept captures the global structural kinematics through minimal vehicle representation. Global vehicle modes such as pitch and roll can be represented by applying prescribed motion boundary conditions extracted from full vehicle models.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0590
Michael E. Jackson, LianXiang Yang
The use of composite materials in the automotive industry has become increasingly widespread. With this increase in use, techniques for non-destructive testing (NDT) have become more and more important. Various optical NDT inspective methods such as holography, moiré techniques, and shearography have been used for material testing. Among these methods, shearography appears to be most practical. Shearography has a simple optical setup due to its “self-referencing” system, and it is relatively insensitive against rigid-body motions. Measurements of displacement derivatives, and thus strain directly, rather than the displacement itself is achieved through this method. Therefore shearography detects defects in objects by correlating anomalies of strain which are usually easier than correlating the anomalies of the displacement itself, as in holography. To date shearography has shown potential as a NDT tool for identifying defects in small structures.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0828
Robert J. Withrow
Faced with an ever increasing supply of road load data and no reasonable means to keep track of it, Managing Road Load Data and The Process is about one engineer's charge to deliver a solution. This paper summarizes the approach taken by this engineer and his team to produce a system that not only provides a place to store their data, but facilitates the entire data collection, validation and dissemination process. By following the steps outlined in this document, virtually every opportunity for improvement will be identified. That is, the process is thoroughly explored; the wants and needs of the users are identified, and then, as warranted, turned into functional elements of the system. The result is a central repository that is accessible to all and with the capability of significantly reducing cost and timing. The development process presented here is not a difficult one to accomplish, but does require keeping track of a lot of detail. It can therefore be quite time consuming.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0825
Saikat Ghosh, Sudhakar Medepalli
Tire stiffness can have a significant effect on the spindle and component loads. While its’ effect on the component loads may show a different trend. This paper deals with data acquisition loads using Wheel Force Transducer (WFT) with 17 inch, 18 inch and 20 inch tires and shows how the spindle loads changed for different tire. These loads are applied on the analytical suspension model to generate both component and the body attachment loads. Some of the measured channels are correlated for all the wheel sizes for multiple events to ensure the confidence in the model. It is found that even if spindle loads are increased with tire stiffness, the component loads do not necessarily show a similar trend. This paper studies why higher spindle forces do not always give higher component loads and what are the possible alternatives one may look into to shortlist or select one set of loads over the other.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0827
Xiaobo Yang, Sudhakar Medepalli
In this paper, we study the sensitivity of a vehicle impact harshness (IH) performance to the suspension bushing rates. A mid-sized uni-body SUV is selected for this study, with the acceleration responses at the driver seat track and the steering wheel as objective functions. A sensitivity study is conducted using an ADAMS full vehicle model including a tire model and flexible body structure representation over an IH event. The study resulted in the identification of key bushings that affect the IH performance and its sensitivity to the bushing rates. Based on the results, we came-up with an “optimal” bushing set that minimizes impact harshness, which was subjectively verified to result in significant improvement in IH.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0168
J. Wu, L. Zhang, J. Chen, W. Wang
Advanced material modeling was conducted to describe the thermal-mechanical behavior of Boron Steel during hot stamping, a process in which blanks at 900 °C are formed and quenched between cold dies. Plastic deformation, thermal dilatation and phase transformation were incorporated in the constitutive model and a user-defined subroutine was developed to interface with LS-DYNA. Simulation was conducted on the hot stamping process of a door intrusion beam to gain insight into the physics of the process. Results showed significant influence of the thermal cycle on final product. It was also demonstrated that the program developed can be used as an early feasibility tool to determine baseline processing parameters and to detect potential defects in products without physical prototyping.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0654
Bob R. Powell, Larry J. Ouimet, John E. Allison, Joy A. Hines, Randy S. Beals, Lawrence Kopka, Peter P. Ried
The US Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) and the US Department of Energy launched the Magnesium Powertrain Cast Components Project in 2001 to determine the feasibility and desirability of producing a magnesium-intensive engine; a V6 engine with a magnesium block, bedplate, oil pan, and front cover. In 2003 the Project reached mid-point and accomplished a successful Decision Gate Review for entry into the second half (Phase II) of the Project. Three tasks, comprising Phase I were completed: (1) evaluation of the most promising low-cost, creep-resistant magnesium alloys, (2) design of the engine components using the properties of the optimized alloys and creation of cost model to assess the cost/benefit of the magnesium-intensive engine, and (3) identification and prioritization of scientific research areas deemed by the project team to be critical for the use of magnesium in powertrain applications.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-1372
Dominic Wilson, Devinder Kaur, Mariana Forrest, Feng Lu
The problem of predicting the quality of weld is critical to manufacturing. A great deal of data is collected under multiple conditions to predict the quality. The data generated at Daimler Chrysler has been used to develop a model based on grammatical evolution. Grammatical Evolution Technique is based on Genetic Algorithms and generates rules from the data which fit the data. This paper describes the development of a software tool that enables the user to choose input variables such as the metal types of top and bottom layers and their thickness, intensity and speed of laser beam, to generate a three dimensional map showing weld quality. A 3D weld quality surface can be generated in response to any of the two input variables picked from the set of defining input parameters. This tool will enable the user to pick the right set of input conditions to get an optimal weld quality. The tool is developed in Matlab with Graphical User Interface for the ease of operation.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0656
Jing Ping Liu, Henning Kleeberg, Dean Tomazic, Joseph A. Ciaravino, Amer A. Amer
In a gasoline engine, the unswept in-cylinder residual gas and introduction of external EGR is one of the important means of controlling engine raw NOx emissions and improving part load fuel economy via reduction of pumping losses. Since the trapped in-cylinder Residual Gas Fraction (RGF, comprised of both internal, and external) significantly affects the combustion process, on-line diagnosis and monitoring of in-cylinder RGF is very important to the understanding of the in-cylinder dilution condition. This is critical during the combustion system development testing and calibration processes. However, on-line measurement of in-cylinder RGF is difficult and requires an expensive exhaust gas analyzer, making it impractical for every application. Other existing methods, based on measured intake and exhaust pressures (steady state or dynamic traces) to calculate gas mass flowrate across the cylinder ports, provide a fast and economical solution to this problem.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1696
S.-D. Liu, X. Xiao, L. Zhang, F. J. Landeros
The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of stamping process on oil canning and dent resistance performances of an automotive roof panel. Finite element analysis of stamping processes was carried out using LS-Dyna to obtain thickness and plastic strain distributions under various forming conditions. The forming results were mapped onto the roof model by an in-house developed mapping code. A displacement control approach using an implicit FEM code ABAQUS/Standard was employed for oil canning and denting analysis. An Auto/Steel Partnership Standardized Test Procedure for Dent Resistance was employed to establish the analysis model and to determine the dent and oil canning loads. The results indicate that stamping has a positive effect on dent resistance and a negative effect on oil canning performance. As forming strains increase, dent resistance increases while the oil canning load decreases.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1204
Michael Guo, Barry Lin, Shujath Ali, Rana Sanghera
In this paper, the methodology of finite element analyses of fastened joints in automotive engineering applications is described in detail. The analyses cover a) the possibility of slippage of the spacer with the design/actual clamp load, and under critical operating loads; b) the strength of the fastener and other structural components comprising the joint under the maximum clamp load. The types of fastened joints, the mechanical characteristics of the joints, the relationship of clamp load to torque, the design and maximum clamp loads, the finite element model meshing and assembly, the non-linearity due to contact, the determination of gaps and stack-up, and the nonlinear material simulation and loading procedures are described. An analysis example of a fastened joint on chassis is also illustrated.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1203
Cheng Cao, Sudhakar Medepalli
Engine mount loads are mostly measured from load cells or calculated from measured engine accelerations. This paper introduces an innovative new method to calculate engine mount loads from measured spindle loads. The method starts from calculating suspension attachment loads to body or chassis frame, then calculating engine center of gravity accelerations, and finally calculating engine mount loads from engine inertia forces. This spindle-based engine mount load analysis method is validated by a vehicle with measurements by wheel force transducers and engine load cells. The correlation includes load time history, peak-to-peak load range, and pseudo-damage values. The correlations show good comparisons between measured and predicted in all the categories, especially for the high load components. It is recommended to implement this method in early vehicle design phases.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1206
Michael Guo, Rana Sanghera, Shujath Ali
In this paper, tow hook systems and their functional objectives are briefly introduced. General analysis considerations in strength prediction of a tow hook system are described. These considerations contain nonlinear, clamping and material property simulations. Connections and loading simulation of a tow hook system model are discussed in details. A correlation example of a tow hook system is illustrated. This study shows that detailed modeling of a tow hook system is a fundamental requirement for accurate strength prediction and good correlation between finite element analysis and testing.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1349
Xiaobo Yang, Sudhakar Medepalli
In this study, a full vehicle with durability tire model established with ADAMS is applied to simulate the dynamic behavior of the vehicle under severe rough road proving ground events, where the shock force-velocity characteristics are modeled as nonlinear curves and multi-stage representations, respectively. The shock forces and velocities at each corner are resolved and through full factorial DOE, the shock forces and velocities response surface models are established to analyze the sensitivities of shock force and velocity to the shock damping characteristics.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1348
Dajun Zhang, Mohammed A. Malik, Uday Prasade, Cheng Cao, Sudhakar Medepalli
Transmission mounts are usually tested as an assembly and typically only translational stiffnesses are provided. The torsional stiffness of the assembly is traditionally estimated based on experience in load simulation and analysis. This paper presents a procedure to estimate the torsional stiffness of the transmission mount assembly by using the test data. The effects of the torsional stiffness on the simulation results are also discussed.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1047
Shyam Kariat, Peter Fitch, Jin Wu, Li Zhang
The automotive industry is rapidly implementing computer simulation in every aspect of their processes mainly to decrease the time required to bring new models to market. Computer simulation can also be used to reduce the cost of vehicle development and manufacturing. A major portion of the manufacturing cost associated with automotive stamping lies in the process design, build and tryout of production dies and in automation of the transfer equipment. Press home-line tryout is largely a trial-and-error process relying heavily on the skills and experience of tool and die makers. To reduce this dependence on human skills and effort, press-line simulation can be effectively utilized to verify the design accuracy thereby reducing the changes needed to rework the production die/tool. The entire press-line with all its complete accessories can be modeled and checked for design errors similar to the try-out conducted in the production plant.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1404
Cheng Cao, Saikat Ghosh, Rajesh Rao, Sudhakar Medepalli
This paper introduces a reliable method to calculate body mount loads from wheel-force-transducer (WFT) measurements on framed vehicles. The method would significantly reduce time and cost in vehicle development process. The prediction method includes two parts: Hybrid Load Analysis (HLA) that has been used by DaimlerChrysler Corporation and Body Mount Load Analysis (BMLA) that is introduced by this paper for the first time. The method is validated on a body-on-frame SUV and a pickup truck through one proving ground events. The example shown in this paper is for a SUV and one of the most severe events. In HLA, the loads at suspension-to-frame attachments are calculated from spindle loads measured by WFT. In BMLA, body mount loads were calculated using outputs of HLA with detailed finite-element-modeled frame and body. The loads are compared with measured body mount loads. The comparisons are conducted in range, standard deviation (S.D.), and fatigue pseudo-damage.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 57

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