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Viewing 1 to 30 of 151
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0598
Walter F. Piock, Peter Weyand, Edgard Wolf, Volker Heise
The success of stratified combustion is strongly determined by the injection and ignition system used. A large temporal and spatial variation of the main parameters - mixture composition and charge motion - in the vicinity of the spark location are driving the demands for significantly improved ignition systems. Besides the requirements for conventional homogeneous combustion systems higher ignition energy and breakdown voltage capability is needed. The spark location or spark plug gap itself has to be open and well accessible for the mixture to allow a successful flame kernel formation and growth into the stratified mixture regime, while being insensitive to potential interaction with liquid fuel droplets or even fuel film. For this purpose several different ignition concepts are currently being developed. The present article will give an ignition system overview for stratified combustion within Delphi Powertrain Systems.
2004-10-18
Technical Paper
2004-21-0068
Vladimir Rasin, Dave McNamara, Craig Simonds, Frank Perry, Gary Streelman
Our customers expect in their vehicles the same constant connectivity that they experience in their homes through high speed internet portals. New services based on these advances will be transparent and ubiquitous - completely integrated into our lives, just as electricity comes to the wall socket or water from the faucet. The Wi-Fi Radio implements this vision using Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) based on the suite of IEEE 802.11 standards. Drivers have constant wireless connectivity and personalized digital content made available to them through the Wi-Fi Radio. Ford and our partner Delphi developed the Wi-Fi Radio to overcome the inherent functional and packaging limitations of our vehicles, to quickly introduce new technology at affordable prices and to seamlessly integrate new services into the vehicle. We chose the radio as the integration site because the radio is accessible to every customer and affordable on every vehicle.
1999-10-10
Technical Paper
1999-01-3387
Daniel E. Denlinger, Brian M. D’Amico, Brett A. Stanley
The four major discriminators for products in the market place are Technology, Quality,1 Cost and Delivery. Effective measurement systems and initial design quality have the largest impact on delivered field quality, program development cost and timing, as well as customer enthusiasm. System-level reliability testing methods have a major impact on the business health of any product. The implementation of laboratory forced failure testing in simultaneously applied energy environments has the largest influence for "designing in" field reliability and lowering development cost. Clearly a policy change from success based testing to forced failure testing has had the largest impact on results for the consumer.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0860
W. B. Williamson, M. G. Zammit, H. J. Robota, D. J. Ball, D. G. Linden
Dual-brick catalyst systems containing Pd-only catalysts followed by Pt/Rh three-way catalysts (TWCs) are effective emission solutions for both close-coupled and underfloor LEV/ULEV applications due to optimal hydrocarbon light-off, NOx control, and balance of precious metal (PGM) usage. Dual-brick [Pd +Pt/Rh] systems on 3.8L V-6 LEV-calibrated vehicles were characterized as a function of PGM loading, catalyst technology, converter volumes, and substrate cell density. While hydrocarbon emissions improve with increasing Pd loading, decreasing the front catalyst volume at constant Pd content (resulting in higher Pd density) improved light-off emissions. Use of 600cpsi substrates improved underfloor NMHC emissions on a 3.8L vehicle by ∼ 6-10mg/mi compared to 400cpsi catalysts, and thus allowing reduction of catalyst volume while achieving ULEV emission levels without air addition.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0939
In Kwang Yoo, Kenneth Simpson, Myron Bell, Stephen Majkowski
A coolant temperature model of an internal combustion engine has been formulated to meet the new On-Board Diagnostics II (OBD II) requirement for coolant temperature rationality. The model utilizes information available within the production Engine Control Module (ECM). The temperature prediction capability has been tested for various “real-world” driving conditions and cycles along with regulated drive cycles. The model can be calibrated to find the appropriate timing for initiation of a diagnostic algorithm for engine cooling system and Coolant Temperature Sensor (CTS) faults. A diagnostic scheme has been developed to detect and isolate various types of cooling system failures using engine soak time information available from a low power timer in the ECM.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-1006
Raj Roychoudhury, Dana Sun, Mohamed Hamid, Craig Hanson
A finite element model of a folded airbag with the module cover and steering wheel system was developed to estimate the injury numbers of a 5th percentile female dummy in an out-of-position (OOP) situation. The airbag model was correlated with static airbag deployments and standard force plate tests. The 5th percentile finite element dummy model developed by First Technology Safety Systems (FTSS) was used in the simulation. The following two OOP tests were simulated with the airbag model including a validated steering wheel finite element model: 1. Chest on air bag module for maximum chest interaction from pressure loading (MS6-D) and 2. Neck on air bag module for maximum neck interaction from membrane loading (MS8-D). These two simulations were then compared to the test results. Satisfactory correlation was found in both the cases.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-1047
Joe Z. Li, Mike Raney, Xiaoqing Zheng
The fluid flow in a direct-injection gasoline diaphragm fuel pump is analyzed using a multi-physics simulation program. The analysis accounts for fully coupled fluid-structure interactions (FSI), the effects of the diaphragm movement and its deformation, the FSI between the diaphragm and the fluid, the FSI between the inlet/outlet valves and the fluid, and the solid-solid contact between the inlet/outlet valves and the valve seats. The flow rate of the fuel pump under various cam speeds is examined. The accuracy of the predictions for the flow rate of the fuel pump is assessed through comparisons with the experimental data, and moderately good agreement is obtained. In addition, some conclusions based on this study are summarized for reference.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0632
Suresh Shah, Norm Kakarala
TPO is getting wider acceptance for automotive applications. An exterior application like a fascia is a very good example. Interiors are still a challenge due to many reasons including overall system cost. For interior applications, “all-olefin” means it mainly consists of three materials: TPO skin, cross-linked olefinic-based foam and PP substrate. The driving force for TPO in Europe is mainly recyclability while in the USA, it is long-term durability. This paper describes the key limitations of the current TPO systems which are: poor grain retention of TPO skin, shrinkage in-consistency of the skin, high cost of priming (or other treatments) and painting of the skin, lower process window of the semi-crystalline TPO material during thermoforming or In-mold lamination / Low pressure molding, high cost of the foam, low tear strength of the foam for deep draw ratio etc.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0444
Shih-Wei Kung, K. Brent Dunlap, Robert S. Ballinger
A front disc brake system is used as an example for an investigation of low frequency squeal. Many different modifications to this disc brake system have been proposed and this paper focuses on a solution that reduces the stiffness of the rotor. This is accomplished by a reduction in the Young's modulus of the rotor material. The complex eigenvalue method is used for a detailed analytical study in order to obtain a better understanding of this solution technique. Modal participation factors are calculated to examine the modal coupling mechanism. Parametric studies are also performed to find out the effects of friction coefficient and rotor stiffness. Results show that shifting rotor resonance frequencies may ecouple the modal interaction and eliminate dynamic instability, which is in agreement with experimental results.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0445
Thomas Valvano, Kwangjin Lee
The severe thermal distortion of a brake rotor can affect important brake system characteristics such as the system response and brake judder propensity. This paper will propose a technique to determine the thermal distortion under transient or steady state conditions. The technique involves utilizing a PC-based computer program to calculate the necessary thermal parameters and apply the results as input to a finite element-based thermal stress analysis. This unique approach provides a reliable methodology to determine the heat input and cooling characteristics of a given brake system in addition to resultant distortion and stress components within the brake rotor. Analysis results are also compared to measured temperature and distortion data.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0579
Changhua Lin, Jeffrey Saunders, Simon Watkins
In this paper, a theoretical model for the calculation of Specific Dissipation (SD) was developed. Based on the model, the effect of ambient and coolant radiator inlet temperatures on SD has been predicted. Results indicate that the effect of ambient and coolant inlet temperature variation on SD is small (less than 2%) when ambient temperature varies between 10 and 50°C and coolant radiator inlet temperature between 60 and 120°C. The effect of coolant flowrate on SD is larger if there is a larger flowrate variation. Experimental results indicate that a 1 % variation at 1.0 L/s will cause about ±0.6% SD variation. Therefore the flowrate should be carefully controlled.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0557
M. James Grieve, Edward G. Himes
Both evaporative emissions and tailpipe emissions have been reduced by more than 90% from uncontrolled levels in state-of-the-art. However, now that the objective is to reach near-zero emission levels, the need for aggressive purging of the canister and fuel tank and the need for extremely precise control of engine Air/Fuel ratio (A/F) come into conflict. On-board diagnostics and the wide variation in operating conditions and fuel properties in the “real world” add to the challenge of resolving these conflicting requirements. An advanced canister purge algorithm has been developed which substantially eliminates the effect of canister purge on A/F control by estimating and compensating for the fuel and air introduced by the purge system. This paper describes the objectives and function of this algorithm and the validation of its performance.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0556
Daniel McKay, Gary Nichols, Bart Schreurs
Delphi has developed a second-generation Electronic Throttle Control system optimized for high volume applications. The Delphi system integrates several unique driver performance features, extensive security/diagnostics, and provides significant benefits for the vehicle manufacturer. For Model Year 2000, the Delphi ETC system has been successfully implemented on several popular SUVs and passenger cars built and sold around the world. The ETC driver features, security systems, and manufacturer benefits are presented as implemented on these Model Year 2000 applications.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0546
Mark H. Svoboda
When an air meter is specified for an engine management system, air meter accuracy is given high priority. Air meter manufacturers characterize the accuracy of their products using laboratory instrumentation to measure the air meter output vs. flow characteristics. Ultimately the air meter is applied to an engine management system in a vehicle. The engine management system must use the information provided by the air meter without the benefit of laboratory instrumentation. Therefore, the entire measurement system must be considered in evaluating the effective accuracy. The most fundamental aspect to consider is the output signal format between the air meter and the engine management system. Two commonly available formats will be investigated: frequency and voltage.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0736
Wolfgang Diegmann, Frank H. Adam, Ruediger Tiedeck, Werner Hoffmanns
Legal requirements, especially in the European Union, rising concern about our environment and economic reasons force us to look at End of Life Vehicles (ELV's) more critically. This paper describes some projects where recycling technologies have been developed showing clearly that recycling can be profitable. The projects demonstrate the recycling of Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) insulation in automotive wiring, a separation technology for different plastic materials by melting point, the treatment of laminated materials like flexible printed circuits, some ideas of fastening systems, suited for disassembly and several basic rules for making recycling easier and profitable.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0727
Jason J. Tao, Todd A. Bishop
A recent trend within the automotive industry has been an emphasis on the development of modular assemblies for future vehicle applications. This trend has created a need for the development of methods to predict the performance of modules within the vehicle environment. In particular, the development of system models that account for the interactions between components within a modular assembly is necessary to insure that a module is properly designed. This paper describes a finite element system model of a damper module as installed in a McPherson strut front suspension. The modeling techniques used to construct the components within the modular assembly are discussed. The results of a study of the structural behavior of a damper module model subjected to quasi-static loading conditions are presented. Additionally, the effects of changes in individual component specifications on the overall system response are considered and the results are displayed.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0696
Aleksander Hac, Melinda D. Simpson
An algorithm for estimation of vehicle yaw rate and side slip angle using steering wheel angle, wheel speed, and lateral acceleration sensors is proposed. It is intended for application in vehicle stability enhancement systems, which use controlled brakes or steering. The algorithm first generates two initial estimates of yaw rate from wheel speeds and from lateral acceleration. A new estimate is subsequently calculated as a weighted average of the two initial ones, with the weights proportional to confidence levels in each estimate. This preliminary estimate is fed into a closed loop nonlinear observer, which generates the final estimate of yaw rate along with estimates of lateral velocity and side slip angle. Parameters of the observer depend on the estimated surface coefficient of adhesion, thus providing adaptation to changes in road surface coefficient of adhesion.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0817
Roy McCann
This paper investigates a method for improving vehicle stability by incorporating feedback from a yaw rate sensor into an electric power steering system. Presently, vehicle stability enhancement techniques are an extension of antilock braking systems in aiding the driver during vehicle maneuvers. One of the contributors to loss of vehicle control is the reduction in tactile feedback from the steering handwheel when driving on wet or icy pavement. This paper presents research indicating that the use yaw rate feedback improves vehicle stability by increasing the amount of tactile feedback when driving under adverse road conditions.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0819
Sanket Amberkar, Mark Kushion, Kirt Eschtruth, Farhad Bolourchi
Electric power steering (EPS) is an advanced steering system that uses an electric motor to provide steering assist. Being a new technology it lacks the extensive operational history of conventional steering systems. Also conventional systems cannot be used to command an output independent of the driver input. In contrast EPS, by means of an electric motor, could be used to do so. As a result EPS systems may have additional failure modes, which need to be studied. In this paper we will consider the requirements for successful EPS operation. The steps required to develop diagnostics based on the requirements are also discussed. The results of this paper have been implemented in various EPS-based programs.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0888
Joon-Ho Yoo, Joseph V. Bonadies, Eric Detwiler, Mitch Ober, Dennis Reed
It is well known that hydrocarbon reduction during a cold start is a major issue in achieving ultra low emissions standards. This paper describes one of the possible approaches for reducing the cold-start hydrocarbon emissions by using a fast “light-off” planar oxygen sensor. The goal of this study was to verify the operation characteristics of Delphi's fast “light-off” planar oxygen sensor's (INTELLEK OSP) operating characteristics and the closed-loop performance for achieving improved hydrocarbon control for stringent emission standards. Tests were conducted in open-loop and closed-loop mode under steady and transient conditions using a 1996 model year 2.4-liter DOHC in-line 4-cylinder engine with a close-coupled catalytic converter. Overall performance of the OSP showed relatively quick reaction time to reach the operating temperature.
1999-10-25
Technical Paper
1999-01-3639
Mark D. Hemingway, Dave Goulette, Gene Ripley, Tom Thoreson, Joachim Kupe, Darrell Herling, Suresh Baskaran, Monty Smith, Del Lessor, Jud Virden
With ever more stringent CO2 emissions mandates, many automobile manufacturers are seeking the fuel economy benefits of diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines. At the same time the emissions standards that diesel and gasoline engines will have to meet in the next decade continue to reduce. Proposed solutions for meeting the stringent emissions standards all appear to have limitations, such as propensities to poisoning from sulfur, narrow operating temperature windows, and requirements for controls that give rapid rich excursions. Non-thermal plasma-catalyst systems have shown good performance in bench testing while being largely unaffected by these same issues. A two-stage system with a unique non-thermal plasma reactor combined with a zeolite-based catalyst has been constructed and shown to work over a wide temperature range.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0172
Chantal S. Parenteau, Wenqi Shen, Minoo Shah
This study evaluates the comfort benefits of adjustable pedals by determining their effect on the distance between the occupant and steering wheel, occupant posture and foot kinematics. For the study, 20 volunteers were tested in a small and large vehicle equipped with adjustable pedals. Twenty volunteers were tested in a small and large vehicle at 3 pedal positions: normal, comfortable and maximum tolerable. In the small car, the decrease in ankle-to-steering wheel distance between the normal and comfortable position was higher in the short-statured group than the medium group. The mean change in chest-to-steering wheel distance was about 50 mm in the medium and in the order of 40 mm in the short group. The seatback angle increased by 2° in the medium group and decreased by 3° in the short group. In the large car, the decrease in ankle-to-steering wheel distance between comfortable and the normal position was about 70 mm in the short-statured and medium group.
1999-12-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-3079
Bradley Scott Farrenkopf
This paper describes a semi-active damping control system that responds in real-time to road and driving conditions based on body motions as determined through ABS wheel speed sensors. The use of these existing sensors for vehicle information eliminates the need for the additional sensors (e.g. accelerometers and body-to-wheel position/velocity sensors) that are commonly part of semi-active suspension systems. This technology also allows for further cost and part count reductions through the combination of the suspension and brake controls into a single electronic control unit. This paper has been previously presented in 1998 at the SAE Controlled Suspension System Toptec.
1999-08-17
Technical Paper
1999-01-2927
John E. Kirwan, Ather A. Quader, M. James Grieve
This paper first reports on the benchmarking of a gasoline- fueled vehicle currently for sale in California that is certified to ULEV standards. Emissions data from this vehicle indicate the improvements necessary over current technology to meet SULEV tailpipe standards. Tests with this vehicle also show emissions levels with current technology under off-cycle conditions representative of real-world use. We then present Delphi's strategy of on-board partial oxidation (POx) reforming with gasoline-fueled, spark-ignition engines. On-board reforming provides a source of hydrogen fuel. Tests were run with bottled gas simulating the output of a POx reformer. Results show that an advanced Engine Management System with a small on-board reformer can provide very low tailpipe emissions both under cold start and warmed-up conditions using relatively small amounts of POx gas. The data cover both normal US Federal Test Procedure (FTP) conditions as well as more extreme, off-cycle operation.
1999-08-17
Technical Paper
1999-01-2946
Jeffrey J. Ronning, Gregory L. Grant
Most large automobile manufacturers are considering adding hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) to their product portfolio for environmental reasons. Some, like Toyota, Nissan and Honda, have already begun producing or have plans for producing hybrids. Skeptics in the industry see these efforts as mostly intended to enhance the automaker's environmental image at a cost that is not recoverable in the marketplace. Few in the automotive industry claim a sound economic basis for hybrids, and furthermore are repelled by the disruption of existing systems they promise. To test the validity of the industry's generally negative view of HEV economics, this paper establishes a logical, mission-based classification for HEV system architecture and performs a present value analysis for the three classes.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0301
Fong Z. Li
In the catalytic converter, the thermal conductivity of the insulation material (intumescent mat) placed between the ceramic catalyst and the metal shell is strongly dependent on the temperature, resulting in the solving of non-linear heat conduction equations. In this paper, the analytic solution for the steady heat flow in a cylinder with temperature dependent conductivity is given. Using this analytic solution for the mat and including convection and radiation at the converter skin, an analytical expression for calculating converter skin temperature is obtained. This expression can be easily incorporated in a Fortran code to calculate the temperatures.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0223
Fong Z. Li
Accurately predicting converter assembly deformation and mat pressure is essential in converter packaging design and manufacturing. In stuffing packaging, the annulus between the deformed shell and the catalyst is larger than that between the stuffing cone and the catalyst. As a result, the mat expands and undergoes unloading process. Tests show that the mat exhibits different loading and unloading characteristics. Using such a hysteresis mat pressure vs density curve in finite element analysis, the computed converter deformations closely agree with test data. Conversly, neglecting the mat hysteresis behavior may overestimate the deformation and pressure by a factor of three to four.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0109
Bryan Riley, George Kuo, Brian Schwartz, Jon Zumberge, Kevin Shipp
Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) technology is presently on the horizon as a convenience function intended to reduce driver workload. This paper presents an implementation of a brake algorithm, which extends the production cruise control feature. A brief overview of the system architecture and subsystem interfaces to the forward-obstacle detection system, throttle and engine management controls are described. Considerations of moding ACC with ABS and Traction Control are presented at the vehicle level. This development activity is presented in two major phases. Both phases of this development project utilize CAN controllers and transceivers to implement requirements for limited access highway driving. The initial phase of development requires the brake control to follow a deceleration command and operate “open-loop” to the vehicle controller. Vehicle test data capturing smooth stops on high coefficient surfaces is presented as insight to the braking performance of the vehicle.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0059
Tim Basner
The most popular aluminum alloys for semi-solid automotive components are A356 and A357. The density of rheocast semi-solid A357 is higher than die cast A357 and allows for both T5 and T6 heat treatment. The mechanical properties of rheocast semi-solid A357 was found to be more dependent upon the heat treat schedule and casting soundness than by the solid content of the semi-solid slurry or the globule shape.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0056
Henry Kong, Andrew Betts
A method of canceling unknown angular rate effects in impact immunity measurement for angular rate sensors is presented. A pair of the same type of testing sensors is arranged such that the sensing axes of the sensor pair are 180° out of phase. While an angular rate produces anti-phase component in the sensor outputs, a linear acceleration produces in-phase response from the sensors due to similar mechanical symmetry. This phase difference is used to cancel the angular rate component even though the actual angular rate may still be unknown. This cancellation can be derived from the sensor output transfer function and is supported with our experimental data.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 151

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