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Viewing 1 to 30 of 55
2005-11-22
Technical Paper
2005-01-4115
Luis Carlos Marcoccia
This paper provides a survey about the consequences of a 42V Power Supply System for new vehicle projects, specially, its impact on directed project for Emerging Markets. At a first moment, it will be described new systems and its demand for additional power availability for future projects, such as electrical steering and brake systems; electrical air conditioning compressor; and electrical water and oil pumps. Following this subject, it will be presented possible alternatives for 14/42V Power Supply Systems, and also its impact over Power and Signal Distribution System components, such as connector, terminals, cables, relays, electrical centers, etc. Finally, the previous presented scenarios will be analyzed under a point of view for the Emerging Market demand for such new proposed systems, looking for best alternative driven.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0195
Satishchandra C. Wani
Abstract Bond wires are used in automotive electronic modules to carry current from external harness to components where flexibility under thermal cyclic loading is very essential between PCB (Printed Circuit Board) and connectors. They are very thin wires (few μm) made up of gold, aluminum or copper and have to undergo mechanical reliability to withstand extreme mechanical and thermal loads during different vehicle operation scenarios. Thermal reliability of bond wire is to make sure that it can withstand prescribed electric current under given boundary conditions without fusing thereby retaining electronic module's functionality. While carrying current, bond wire by virtue of its nature resists electric current flow and generates heat also called as joule heating. Joule heating is proportional to current flow and electrical resistance and if not handled properly can lead to thermal run away conditions.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-0641
Debashis Ghosh, Mingyu Wang, Edward Wolfe, Kuo-huey Chen, Shailendra Kaushik, Taeyoung Han
Spot, or distributed, cooling and heating is an energy efficient way of delivering comfort to an occupant in the car. This paper describes an approach to distributed cooling in the vehicle. A two passenger CFD model of an SUV cabin was developed to obtain the solar and convective thermal loads on the vehicle, characterize the interior thermal environment and accurately evaluate the fluid-thermal environment around the occupants. The present paper focuses on the design and CFD analysis of the energy efficient HVAC system with spot cooling. The CFD model was validated with wind tunnel data for its overall accuracy. A baseline system with conventional HVAC air was first analyzed at mid and high ambient conditions. The airflow and cooling delivered to the driver and the passenger was calculated. Subsequently, spot cooling was analyzed in conjunction with a much lower conventional HVAC airflow.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0645
Kuo-huey Chen, Shailendra Kaushik, Taeyoung Han, Debashis Ghosh, Mingyu Wang
The focus of this study is to validate the predictive capability of a recently developed physiology based thermal comfort modeling tool in a realistic thermal environment of a vehicle passenger compartment. Human subject test data for thermal sensation and comfort was obtained in a climatic wind tunnel for a cross-over vehicle in a relatively warm thermal environment including solar load. A CFD/thermal model that simulates the vehicle operating conditions in the tunnel, is used to provide the necessary inputs required by the stand-alone thermal comfort tool. Comparison of the local and the overall thermal sensation and comfort levels between the human subject test and the tool's predictions shows a reasonably good agreement. The next step is to use this modeling technique in designing and developing energy-efficient HVAC systems without compromising thermal comfort of the vehicle occupants.
1997-05-20
Technical Paper
971876
John A. White, Jack C. Webb
In this paper, finite element shape optimization is used to determine the optimum air cleaner shape and rib design for low shell noise. Shape variables are used to vary the height and location of rib elements, as well as vary the shape of the air cleaner surfaces. The optimization code evaluates each design variation and selects a search direction that will reduce surface velocity. Sound power radiation is calculated for each optimized design using an acoustic code. Large reductions in shell noise were achieved by optimizing the shape of the air cleaner surface and rib design. Optimization of the rib pattern alone yielded a local optimization, as opposed to a global optimization that represented the best possible design.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980493
Min Xu, Lee E. Markle
A high pressure outwardly opening fuel injector has been developed to produce sprays that meet the stringent requirements of gasoline direct injection (DI) combustion systems. Predictions of spray characteristics have been made using KIVA-3 in conjunction with Star-CD injector flow modeling. After some modeling iterations, the nozzle design has been optimized for the required flow, injector performance, and spray characteristics. The hardware test results of flow and spray have confirmed the numerical modeling accuracy and the spray quality. The spray's average Sauter mean diameter (SMD) is less than 15 microns at 30 mm distance from the nozzle. The DV90, defined as the drop diameter such that 90% of the total liquid volume is in drops of smaller diameter, is less than 40 microns. The maximum penetration is about 70 mm into air at atmospheric pressure. An initial spray slug is not created due to the absence of a sac volume.
1999-10-10
Technical Paper
99SC12
Rosemary Dubbeldam, Gert Nilson, Barbara Pal, Niklas Eriksson, Clare Owen, Adrian Roberts, Jeff Crandall, Gregory Hall, Paul Manning, Angus Wallace
It has been reported that lower extremity injuries represent a measurable portion of all moderate-to-severe automobile crash- related injuries. Thus, a simple tool to assist with the design of leg and foot injury countermeasures is desirable. The objective of this study is to develop a mathematical model which can predict load propagation and kinematics of the foot and leg in frontal automotive impacts. A multi-body model developed at the University of Virginia and validated for blunt impact to the whole foot has been used as basis for the current work. This model includes representations of the tibia, fibula, talus, hindfoot, midfoot and forefoot bones. Additionally, the model provides a means for tensioning the Achilles tendon. In the current study, the simulations conducted correspond to tests performed by the Transport Research Laboratory and the University of Nottingham on knee-amputated cadaver specimens.
2005-11-22
Technical Paper
2005-01-4027
Felipe José Astorri, Mohamed Idris, Henri Clesse
Several heater cores failed due to erosion by cavitation. After analysis, most of failures were explained by the presence of impurities in the heater core. It was then decided with the customer to use CFD simulation in order to prove that the cavitation was not caused by design concept of the tank. In this paper, we present the results of heater core simulations done in 2D and in 3D with Fluent. The objective is to simulate the pressure and velocity distribution within the heater core and to verify if the zones of low pressure are below the saturation vapour pressure of the fluid causing cavitation. In these areas, the deterioration of the tubes might occur due to erosion by cavitation.
2004-11-16
Technical Paper
2004-01-3254
Felipe José Astorri, Flavio Sawaya Sacamoto
For A/C and cooling systems development is usual send vehicles to US or Europe for wind tunnel tests, witch is expensive and has a long lead-time. Here in Brazil Delphi has at the Piracicaba Technical Center a chamber equipped with temperature control and chassis dynamometer. There is a up-grade project for it that consist in add ducts with fans inside the chamber that will get air from the chamber, already in the right temperature, accelerate and homogenate the air flow and blow it out direct to the front end of the vehicle. For development purposes may be possible eliminate totally the necessity of sending vehicle abroad. It was then decided to use CFD simulation to predict firstly the required fan power necessary to supply winds until 120 km/h at the front end of the vehicle and secondly predict the airflow pattern inside the chamber, considering chamber inlet air, chamber outlet air, exhaust outlet, duct outlet and flow pattern around the vehicle.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0221
Devendra Rai, T. K. Jestin, Lev Vitkin
The complexity of automotive software and the needs for shorter development time and software portability require the development of new approaches and standards for software architectures. The AUTOSAR project is one of the most comprehensive and promising solutions for defining a methodology supporting a function-driven development process. Furthermore, it manifests itself as a standard for expressing compatible software interfaces at the Application Layer. This paper discusses the implementation of AUTOSAR requirements for the component structure, as well as interfaces to the Application Layer in a model-based development environment. The paper outlines the major AUTOSAR requirements for software components, provides examples of their implementation in a Simulink/Stateflow model, and describes the modelbased implementation of an operating system for running AUTOSAR software executables (“runnables”).
2008-10-07
Technical Paper
2008-36-0361
Didimo Garcia Neto, Juliano Fujioka Mologni, Frank Kenji Goto
This paper investigates the application of thick film hybrid circuit technology on ceramic substrate in comparison to the main stream substrate FR-4 (Flame Retardant 4) for PCB implementation. The study is based on computer models for these very substrates in order to simulate the propagation of heat through convection and conduction within the material boundaries. In order to simulate electronic components surface mounted, different heat sources are randomly arranged on physical contact to the surface of the material under investigation. The results emphasize and discern the usage of both substrates and its most suitable environment verifying the application towards vehicular integration. Future study may include experimental analysis for simulated data verification and validation of thick film hybrid circuit technology for the automotive industry.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0011
Kesav Kumar Sridharan, Swaminathan Viswanathan
Abstract Current generation automobiles are controlled by electronic modules for performing various functions. These electronic modules have numerous semiconductor devices mounted on printed circuit boards. Solders are generally used as thermal interface material between surface mount devices and printed circuit boards (PCB) for efficient heat transfer. In the manufacturing stage, voids are formed in solders during reflow process due to outgassing phenomenon. The presence of these voids in solder for power packages with exposed pads impedes heat flow and can increase the device temperature. Therefore it is imperative to understand the effect of solder voids on thermal characteristics of semiconductor devices. But the solder void pattern will vary drastically during mass manufacturing. Replicating the exact solder void pattern and doing detail simulation to predict the device temperature for each manufactured module is not practical.
2011-10-06
Technical Paper
2011-28-0083
Rammohan B, Sanjay Singh Chauhan, Arvind Krishna
The development of an analytical model for multilayer stack subjected to temperature change is demonstrated here. Thin continuous layers of materials bonded together deform as a plate due to their differing coefficients of thermal expansion upon subjecting the bonded materials to the change in temperature. Applications of such structures can be found in the electronics industry (the study of warpage issues in printed circuit boards) or in the aerospace industry as (the study of laminated thin sheets used as skin structures for load bearing members such as wings and fuselage). In automotive electronics, critical high-power packages (IGBT, Power FETs) include several layers of widely differing materials (aluminum, solder, copper, ceramics) subjected to wide temperature cyclic ranges. Modeling of such structures by using three-dimensional finite element methods is usually time consuming and may not exactly predict the inter-laminar strains.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-1221
Ronald J. Pierik, James F. Burkhard
Compromises inherent with fixed valve lift and event timing have prompted engine designers to consider Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) systems for many decades. In recent years, some relatively basic forms of VVA have been introduced into production engines. Greater performance and driveability expectations of customers, more stringent emission regulations set by government legislators, and the mutual desire for higher fuel economy are increasingly at odds. As a solution, many OEM companies are seriously considering large-scale application of higher function VVA mechanisms in their next generation vehicles. This paper describes the continuing development progress of a mechanical VVA system. Design features and operation of the mechanism are explained. Test results are presented in two sections: motored cylinder head test data focuses on VVA system friction, control system performance, valve lift and component stress.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0557
M. James Grieve, Edward G. Himes
Both evaporative emissions and tailpipe emissions have been reduced by more than 90% from uncontrolled levels in state-of-the-art. However, now that the objective is to reach near-zero emission levels, the need for aggressive purging of the canister and fuel tank and the need for extremely precise control of engine Air/Fuel ratio (A/F) come into conflict. On-board diagnostics and the wide variation in operating conditions and fuel properties in the “real world” add to the challenge of resolving these conflicting requirements. An advanced canister purge algorithm has been developed which substantially eliminates the effect of canister purge on A/F control by estimating and compensating for the fuel and air introduced by the purge system. This paper describes the objectives and function of this algorithm and the validation of its performance.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0109
Bryan Riley, George Kuo, Brian Schwartz, Jon Zumberge, Kevin Shipp
Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) technology is presently on the horizon as a convenience function intended to reduce driver workload. This paper presents an implementation of a brake algorithm, which extends the production cruise control feature. A brief overview of the system architecture and subsystem interfaces to the forward-obstacle detection system, throttle and engine management controls are described. Considerations of moding ACC with ABS and Traction Control are presented at the vehicle level. This development activity is presented in two major phases. Both phases of this development project utilize CAN controllers and transceivers to implement requirements for limited access highway driving. The initial phase of development requires the brake control to follow a deceleration command and operate “open-loop” to the vehicle controller. Vehicle test data capturing smooth stops on high coefficient surfaces is presented as insight to the braking performance of the vehicle.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0445
Thomas Valvano, Kwangjin Lee
The severe thermal distortion of a brake rotor can affect important brake system characteristics such as the system response and brake judder propensity. This paper will propose a technique to determine the thermal distortion under transient or steady state conditions. The technique involves utilizing a PC-based computer program to calculate the necessary thermal parameters and apply the results as input to a finite element-based thermal stress analysis. This unique approach provides a reliable methodology to determine the heat input and cooling characteristics of a given brake system in addition to resultant distortion and stress components within the brake rotor. Analysis results are also compared to measured temperature and distortion data.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0444
Shih-Wei Kung, K. Brent Dunlap, Robert S. Ballinger
A front disc brake system is used as an example for an investigation of low frequency squeal. Many different modifications to this disc brake system have been proposed and this paper focuses on a solution that reduces the stiffness of the rotor. This is accomplished by a reduction in the Young's modulus of the rotor material. The complex eigenvalue method is used for a detailed analytical study in order to obtain a better understanding of this solution technique. Modal participation factors are calculated to examine the modal coupling mechanism. Parametric studies are also performed to find out the effects of friction coefficient and rotor stiffness. Results show that shifting rotor resonance frequencies may ecouple the modal interaction and eliminate dynamic instability, which is in agreement with experimental results.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0546
Mark H. Svoboda
When an air meter is specified for an engine management system, air meter accuracy is given high priority. Air meter manufacturers characterize the accuracy of their products using laboratory instrumentation to measure the air meter output vs. flow characteristics. Ultimately the air meter is applied to an engine management system in a vehicle. The engine management system must use the information provided by the air meter without the benefit of laboratory instrumentation. Therefore, the entire measurement system must be considered in evaluating the effective accuracy. The most fundamental aspect to consider is the output signal format between the air meter and the engine management system. Two commonly available formats will be investigated: frequency and voltage.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0483
Kwangjin Lee
Long repetitive braking, such as one which occurs during a mountain descent, will result in a brake fluid temperature rise and may cause brake fluid vaporization. This may be a concern particularly for passenger cars equipped with aluminum calipers and with a limited air flow to the wheel brake systems. This paper describes the computer modeling techniques to predict the brake fluid temperature rise as well as other brake component temperatures during braking and heat soaking. Numerical results are compared to the measured vehicle data and the effects of relevant brake system parameters on the fluid temperature are investigated. The techniques developed in this study will help brake engineers to build a safer brake system and reduce the extensive vehicle tests currently required.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0406
Jeremy M. Husic, Madana Gopal
The SuperPlug™ door module is a new Delphi innovation. It is a one-piece composite structure, which integrates several door components into one assembly. This reduces the total part count, simplifies the vehicle level assembly process, and reduces labor cost (see the Appendix). The door slam durability test is an important factor in door module design. As more hardware is integrated into the SuperPlug, this subsystem performance in a door slam test becomes important. Therefore, the correct placement of components and the supporting structure is critical. Currently, the evaluation of door slam durability for the SuperPlug is a process of build then test. This is time consuming and costly due to a long testing lead-time and the expense of tooling a new mold. It was realized that a numerical process for assessing the effect of door slam would be required. This process would compute the dynamic response using finite element analysis (FEA).
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0413
Earl L. Decker, David J. Ziemkiewicz, Joseph R. Ross
The objective of this paper is to impart the challenges presented and the solutions derived to transform an artist's rendering into a production driver's door switch to be used in the interior of a high profile sports car. The challenges took many forms throughout the process, from data translation and packaging, to the final decorative issues. The results are a finished product providing a new approach to automotive interior switch design. It incorporates a low profile, continuous plane keypad with “soft touch” feel, tactile feedback, and integrated back lighting.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0396
Joel E. Birsching
The power steering valve plays a key role in the steering performance of a vehicle. It is desirable, therefore, to have a means of predicting valve performance for the development of the steering system. This paper describes a method of applying the orifice equation to a steering valve, along with the procedure for experimentally determining the flow coefficients for this equation. Data is provided which demonstrates the nature of change of the flow coefficients through the operating range of the valve. A method for accounting for these changes is provided, along with correlation results for measured and predicted valve performance.
1999-05-17
Technical Paper
1999-01-1677
Shih-Wei Kung, Rajendra Singh
Damping material for automotive structures is often quantified in terms of composite loss factor or damping ratio by using ASTM/SAE beam or modal tests. Simplified expressions have also been used to estimate certain material properties. However, none of these tests provide any information on the properties of viscoelastic core material such as rubber or adhesive in practical structures. To overcome this deficiency, a refined estimation procedure is proposed. A new sandwich beam model has been developed which describes all layers of an arbitrarily applied damping patch. By using both analytical predictions and modal experiments on a cantilever beam, spectrally-varying loss factor and shear modulus of the unknown core are determined.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0052
Jay F. Gilson
Automotive wiring assembly design and manufacturing has evolved from a locally based business to a global business. It is common today to engineer the design of a wiring assembly in one region of the world, to manufacture it in a second region, and to assemble it into the vehicle in a third region. This creates a need for global collaboration, training and communications. Design for Manufacturability (DFM) is a tool that can aid in this, in developing common processes globally, and reducing the cost and design complexity of the product in the early design stages. To develop a global DFM process, an organization must develop and implement a strategy. This paper will review the approach that an automotive wiring assembly supplier adopted. It will enumerate the benefits of developing a global Design for Manufacturability process, selecting a champion, and using a twelve-step plan to integrate DFM into each region.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0727
Jason J. Tao, Todd A. Bishop
A recent trend within the automotive industry has been an emphasis on the development of modular assemblies for future vehicle applications. This trend has created a need for the development of methods to predict the performance of modules within the vehicle environment. In particular, the development of system models that account for the interactions between components within a modular assembly is necessary to insure that a module is properly designed. This paper describes a finite element system model of a damper module as installed in a McPherson strut front suspension. The modeling techniques used to construct the components within the modular assembly are discussed. The results of a study of the structural behavior of a damper module model subjected to quasi-static loading conditions are presented. Additionally, the effects of changes in individual component specifications on the overall system response are considered and the results are displayed.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0819
Sanket Amberkar, Mark Kushion, Kirt Eschtruth, Farhad Bolourchi
Electric power steering (EPS) is an advanced steering system that uses an electric motor to provide steering assist. Being a new technology it lacks the extensive operational history of conventional steering systems. Also conventional systems cannot be used to command an output independent of the driver input. In contrast EPS, by means of an electric motor, could be used to do so. As a result EPS systems may have additional failure modes, which need to be studied. In this paper we will consider the requirements for successful EPS operation. The steps required to develop diagnostics based on the requirements are also discussed. The results of this paper have been implemented in various EPS-based programs.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0817
Roy McCann
This paper investigates a method for improving vehicle stability by incorporating feedback from a yaw rate sensor into an electric power steering system. Presently, vehicle stability enhancement techniques are an extension of antilock braking systems in aiding the driver during vehicle maneuvers. One of the contributors to loss of vehicle control is the reduction in tactile feedback from the steering handwheel when driving on wet or icy pavement. This paper presents research indicating that the use yaw rate feedback improves vehicle stability by increasing the amount of tactile feedback when driving under adverse road conditions.
2000-05-01
Technical Paper
2000-01-1621
Jon D. Demerly, Kamal Youcef-Toumi
Many vehicle-dynamics models exist to study the motion of a vehicle. Most of these models fall into one of two categories: very simple models for basic analyses and high-order models consisting of many degrees-of-freedom. For many scenarios, the simple models are not adequate. At the same time, for many vehicle handling and braking studies, the high-order models are more complex than necessary. This paper presents a model that includes the dynamics that are relevant to studying vehicle handling and braking, but is still simple enough to run in near real-time. The model was implemented in such a way that it is easily customized for a particular study. Predictions from this simplified model were compared against a high-order model and against actual vehicle test data. The simulations indicate a close agreement in the results.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-1364
David K. S. Chen, Partab Jeswani, Joe Z. Li
Optimization of the mechanical aspects of a heated conical oxygen sensor for desired performances, such as low heater power, good poison resistance, fast light-off, and broad temperature range, etc. was achieved with computer modeling. CFD analysis was used to model the flow field in and around a sensor in an exhaust pipe to predict the convection coefficients, poisoning, and switching time. Heat transfer analysis coupled with electrical heating was applied to predict temperature and light-off time. Results of the optimization are illustrated, with good agreements between modeling and testing.
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