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Viewing 1 to 30 of 53
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0598
Walter F. Piock, Peter Weyand, Edgard Wolf, Volker Heise
The success of stratified combustion is strongly determined by the injection and ignition system used. A large temporal and spatial variation of the main parameters - mixture composition and charge motion - in the vicinity of the spark location are driving the demands for significantly improved ignition systems. Besides the requirements for conventional homogeneous combustion systems higher ignition energy and breakdown voltage capability is needed. The spark location or spark plug gap itself has to be open and well accessible for the mixture to allow a successful flame kernel formation and growth into the stratified mixture regime, while being insensitive to potential interaction with liquid fuel droplets or even fuel film. For this purpose several different ignition concepts are currently being developed. The present article will give an ignition system overview for stratified combustion within Delphi Powertrain Systems.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-1080
Debashis Ghosh, Kimberley King, Brian Schwemmin, Douglas Zhu
Abstract CFD analysis was performed using the FLUENT software to design the thermal system for a hybrid vehicle battery pack. The battery pack contained multiple modular battery elements, called bricks, and the inlet and outlet bus bars that electrically connected the bricks into a series string. The simulated thermal system was comprised of the vehicle cabin, seat cavity, inlet plenum, battery pack, a downstream centrifugal fan, and the vehicle trunk. The fan was modeled using a multiple reference frame approach. A full system analysis was done for airflow and thermal performance optimization to ensure the most uniform cell temperatures under all operating conditions. The mesh for the full system was about 13 million cells run on a 6-node HP cluster. A baseline design was first analyzed for fluid-thermal performance. Subsequently, multiple design iterations were run to create uniform airflow among all the individual bricks while minimizing parasitic pressure drop.
2012-10-02
Technical Paper
2012-36-0114
Luis C. Marcoccia, Ivan A. Almeida
In vehicular mobility context, it is extremely important for the environmental sustainability that the available energy will be used as efficiently as possible, both in the use of internal combustion engines (ICE) as powertrain, as well in the application of Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Motors (HEV/EV). In this comparison, ICE has a lower efficiency when compared to electric motors, wasting much of the potential energy of the fuel in form of heat and noise. On the other hand, the electric vehicles face limitation in autonomy and recharge time, demanding for a more efficient use of energy stored in batteries. This study aims to present emerging technologies for reuse of energy within the automotive context, originally known as “Energy Harvesting” and “Renewable Energies”.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-1134
Adam Weall, James P. Szybist, K. Dean Edwards, Matthew Foster, Keith Confer, Wayne Moore
While the potential emissions and efficiency benefits of HCCI combustion are well known, realizing the potentials on a production intent engine presents numerous challenges. In this study we focus on identifying challenges and opportunities associated with a production intent cam-based variable valve actuation (VVA) system on a multi-cylinder engine in comparison to a fully flexible, naturally aspirated, hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) system on a single-cylinder engine, with both platforms sharing the same GDI fueling system and engine geometry. The multi-cylinder production intent VVA system uses a 2-step cam technology with wide authority cam phasing, allowing adjustments to be made to the negative valve overlap (NVO) duration but not the valve opening durations. On the single-cylinder HVA engine, the valve opening duration and lift are variable in addition to the NVO duration. The content of this paper is limited to the low-medium operating load region at 2000 rpm.
1997-05-20
Technical Paper
971876
John A. White, Jack C. Webb
In this paper, finite element shape optimization is used to determine the optimum air cleaner shape and rib design for low shell noise. Shape variables are used to vary the height and location of rib elements, as well as vary the shape of the air cleaner surfaces. The optimization code evaluates each design variation and selects a search direction that will reduce surface velocity. Sound power radiation is calculated for each optimized design using an acoustic code. Large reductions in shell noise were achieved by optimizing the shape of the air cleaner surface and rib design. Optimization of the rib pattern alone yielded a local optimization, as opposed to a global optimization that represented the best possible design.
1997-10-01
Technical Paper
972905
Karren L. More, Edward A. Kenik, Dorothy W. Coffey, Thomas S. Geer, William J. LaBarge, Richard Beckmeyer, Joseph Theis
The use of advanced electron microscopy techniques to characterize both the bulk and near-atomic level microstructural evolution of catalyst materials during different dynamometer/vehicle aging cycles is an integral part of understanding catalyst deactivation. The study described here was undertaken to evaluate thermally-induced microstructural changes which caused the progressive loss of catalyst performance in a three-way automotive catalyst. Several different catalyst processing variables, for example changing the washcoat ceria content, were also evaluated as a function of aging cycle and thermal history. A number of thermally-induced microstructural changes were identified using high resolution electron microscopy techniques that contributed to the deactivation of the catalyst, including sintering of all washcoat constituents, γ-alumina transforming to α-, β-, and δ-alumina, precious metal redistribution, and constituent encapsulation.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980799
Scott Furry, Jeff Kainz
Intense competition in the automotive industry requires continuous reduction in innovation cycle time, even as corporations are downsizing and system complexity is increasing. Subsequently, the application of recently introduced Rapid Algorithm Development (RAD) tools has facilitated significant advances in the development of embedded control systems. The RAD steps include system modeling, control algorithm design, simulation analysis, automated calibration design, and vehicle implementation through automatic code generation. The application of RAD tools and the associated benefits are described, specifically in the context of Engine Management Systems (EMS). Such benefits include significant reductions in development cycle time, open architecture, automated calibration, and information reuse.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980493
Min Xu, Lee E. Markle
A high pressure outwardly opening fuel injector has been developed to produce sprays that meet the stringent requirements of gasoline direct injection (DI) combustion systems. Predictions of spray characteristics have been made using KIVA-3 in conjunction with Star-CD injector flow modeling. After some modeling iterations, the nozzle design has been optimized for the required flow, injector performance, and spray characteristics. The hardware test results of flow and spray have confirmed the numerical modeling accuracy and the spray quality. The spray's average Sauter mean diameter (SMD) is less than 15 microns at 30 mm distance from the nozzle. The DV90, defined as the drop diameter such that 90% of the total liquid volume is in drops of smaller diameter, is less than 40 microns. The maximum penetration is about 70 mm into air at atmospheric pressure. An initial spray slug is not created due to the absence of a sac volume.
1996-10-01
Technical Paper
962081
Jason Simon, Karim Nasr, John Kreucher
California Ultra Low Emission Vehicle (ULEV) standards call for a significant reduction in the amount of harmful gases that enter the environment from vehicle exhaust. The Electrically Heated Catalyst (EHC) is a possible solution to reduce emissions. A competitive analysis benchmarking study was completed in order to find an optimum EHC design that will perform to ULEV standards. Four suppliers submitted samples and the EHC designs were rigorously tested for temperature, pressure drop, and emissions performance while being aged at different levels.
1998-10-19
Technical Paper
982697
M. V. Casarella, J. B. Ghandhi
Engine tests were conducted to study the effect of fuel-air mixture preparation on the combustion and emission performance of a two-stroke direct-injection engine. The in-cylinder mixture distribution was altered by changing the injection system, injection timing, and by substituting the air in an air-assisted injector with nitrogen. Two injection systems which produce significantly different mixtures were investigated; an air-assisted injector with a highly atomized spray, and a single-fluid high pressure-swirl injector with a dense penetrating spray. The engine was operated at overall A/F ratios of 30:1, where stratification was necessary to ensure stable combustion; and at 20:1 and 15:1 where it was possible to operate in a nearly homogeneous mode. Moderate engine speeds and loads were investigated. The effects of the burning-zone A/F ratio were isolated by using nitrogen as the working fluid in the air-assist injector.
2004-11-16
Technical Paper
2004-01-3254
Felipe José Astorri, Flavio Sawaya Sacamoto
For A/C and cooling systems development is usual send vehicles to US or Europe for wind tunnel tests, witch is expensive and has a long lead-time. Here in Brazil Delphi has at the Piracicaba Technical Center a chamber equipped with temperature control and chassis dynamometer. There is a up-grade project for it that consist in add ducts with fans inside the chamber that will get air from the chamber, already in the right temperature, accelerate and homogenate the air flow and blow it out direct to the front end of the vehicle. For development purposes may be possible eliminate totally the necessity of sending vehicle abroad. It was then decided to use CFD simulation to predict firstly the required fan power necessary to supply winds until 120 km/h at the front end of the vehicle and secondly predict the airflow pattern inside the chamber, considering chamber inlet air, chamber outlet air, exhaust outlet, duct outlet and flow pattern around the vehicle.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0614
Donald V. Johnson, Gregory Roth, Andrew Fedewa, Jeremy Kraenzlein, Xiaojian Yang
Abstract Delphi is developing a new combustion technology called Gasoline Direct-injection Compression Ignition (GDCI), which has shown promise for substantially improving fuel economy. This new technology is able to reuse some of the controls common to traditional spark ignition (SI) engines; however, it also requires several new sensors and actuators, some of which are not common to traditional SI engines. Since this is new technology development, the required hardware set has continued to evolve over the course of the project. In order to support this development work, a highly capable and flexible electronic control system is necessary. Integrating all of the necessary functions into a single controller, or two, would require significant up-front controller hardware development, and would limit the adaptability of the electronic controls to the evolving requirements for GDCI.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1639
Gerard W. Malaczynski, Gregory Roth
Abstract Onboard diagnostic regulations require performance monitoring of diesel particulate filters used in vehicle aftertreatment systems. Delphi has developed a particulate matter (PM) sensor to perform this function. The objective of this sensor is to monitor the soot (PM) concentration in the exhaust downstream of the diesel particulate filter which provides a means to calculate filter efficiency. The particulate matter sensor monitors the deposition of soot on its internal sensing element by measuring the resistance of the deposit. Correlations are established between the soot resistance and soot mass deposited on the sensing element. Currently, the sensor provides the time interval between sensor regeneration cycles, which, with the knowledge of the exhaust gas flow parameters, is correlated to the average soot concentration.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-1221
Ronald J. Pierik, James F. Burkhard
Compromises inherent with fixed valve lift and event timing have prompted engine designers to consider Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) systems for many decades. In recent years, some relatively basic forms of VVA have been introduced into production engines. Greater performance and driveability expectations of customers, more stringent emission regulations set by government legislators, and the mutual desire for higher fuel economy are increasingly at odds. As a solution, many OEM companies are seriously considering large-scale application of higher function VVA mechanisms in their next generation vehicles. This paper describes the continuing development progress of a mechanical VVA system. Design features and operation of the mechanism are explained. Test results are presented in two sections: motored cylinder head test data focuses on VVA system friction, control system performance, valve lift and component stress.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0557
M. James Grieve, Edward G. Himes
Both evaporative emissions and tailpipe emissions have been reduced by more than 90% from uncontrolled levels in state-of-the-art. However, now that the objective is to reach near-zero emission levels, the need for aggressive purging of the canister and fuel tank and the need for extremely precise control of engine Air/Fuel ratio (A/F) come into conflict. On-board diagnostics and the wide variation in operating conditions and fuel properties in the “real world” add to the challenge of resolving these conflicting requirements. An advanced canister purge algorithm has been developed which substantially eliminates the effect of canister purge on A/F control by estimating and compensating for the fuel and air introduced by the purge system. This paper describes the objectives and function of this algorithm and the validation of its performance.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0556
Daniel McKay, Gary Nichols, Bart Schreurs
Delphi has developed a second-generation Electronic Throttle Control system optimized for high volume applications. The Delphi system integrates several unique driver performance features, extensive security/diagnostics, and provides significant benefits for the vehicle manufacturer. For Model Year 2000, the Delphi ETC system has been successfully implemented on several popular SUVs and passenger cars built and sold around the world. The ETC driver features, security systems, and manufacturer benefits are presented as implemented on these Model Year 2000 applications.
1999-10-25
Technical Paper
1999-01-3639
Mark D. Hemingway, Dave Goulette, Gene Ripley, Tom Thoreson, Joachim Kupe, Darrell Herling, Suresh Baskaran, Monty Smith, Del Lessor, Jud Virden
With ever more stringent CO2 emissions mandates, many automobile manufacturers are seeking the fuel economy benefits of diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines. At the same time the emissions standards that diesel and gasoline engines will have to meet in the next decade continue to reduce. Proposed solutions for meeting the stringent emissions standards all appear to have limitations, such as propensities to poisoning from sulfur, narrow operating temperature windows, and requirements for controls that give rapid rich excursions. Non-thermal plasma-catalyst systems have shown good performance in bench testing while being largely unaffected by these same issues. A two-stage system with a unique non-thermal plasma reactor combined with a zeolite-based catalyst has been constructed and shown to work over a wide temperature range.
1999-08-17
Technical Paper
1999-01-2946
Jeffrey J. Ronning, Gregory L. Grant
Most large automobile manufacturers are considering adding hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) to their product portfolio for environmental reasons. Some, like Toyota, Nissan and Honda, have already begun producing or have plans for producing hybrids. Skeptics in the industry see these efforts as mostly intended to enhance the automaker's environmental image at a cost that is not recoverable in the marketplace. Few in the automotive industry claim a sound economic basis for hybrids, and furthermore are repelled by the disruption of existing systems they promise. To test the validity of the industry's generally negative view of HEV economics, this paper establishes a logical, mission-based classification for HEV system architecture and performs a present value analysis for the three classes.
1999-08-17
Technical Paper
1999-01-2927
John E. Kirwan, Ather A. Quader, M. James Grieve
This paper first reports on the benchmarking of a gasoline- fueled vehicle currently for sale in California that is certified to ULEV standards. Emissions data from this vehicle indicate the improvements necessary over current technology to meet SULEV tailpipe standards. Tests with this vehicle also show emissions levels with current technology under off-cycle conditions representative of real-world use. We then present Delphi's strategy of on-board partial oxidation (POx) reforming with gasoline-fueled, spark-ignition engines. On-board reforming provides a source of hydrogen fuel. Tests were run with bottled gas simulating the output of a POx reformer. Results show that an advanced Engine Management System with a small on-board reformer can provide very low tailpipe emissions both under cold start and warmed-up conditions using relatively small amounts of POx gas. The data cover both normal US Federal Test Procedure (FTP) conditions as well as more extreme, off-cycle operation.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0579
Changhua Lin, Jeffrey Saunders, Simon Watkins
In this paper, a theoretical model for the calculation of Specific Dissipation (SD) was developed. Based on the model, the effect of ambient and coolant radiator inlet temperatures on SD has been predicted. Results indicate that the effect of ambient and coolant inlet temperature variation on SD is small (less than 2%) when ambient temperature varies between 10 and 50°C and coolant radiator inlet temperature between 60 and 120°C. The effect of coolant flowrate on SD is larger if there is a larger flowrate variation. Experimental results indicate that a 1 % variation at 1.0 L/s will cause about ±0.6% SD variation. Therefore the flowrate should be carefully controlled.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0546
Mark H. Svoboda
When an air meter is specified for an engine management system, air meter accuracy is given high priority. Air meter manufacturers characterize the accuracy of their products using laboratory instrumentation to measure the air meter output vs. flow characteristics. Ultimately the air meter is applied to an engine management system in a vehicle. The engine management system must use the information provided by the air meter without the benefit of laboratory instrumentation. Therefore, the entire measurement system must be considered in evaluating the effective accuracy. The most fundamental aspect to consider is the output signal format between the air meter and the engine management system. Two commonly available formats will be investigated: frequency and voltage.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0546
Jeff L. Kainz, James C. Smith
In this paper we discuss in detail an algorithm that addresses cylinder-to-cylinder imbalance issues. Maintaining even equivalence-ratio (ϕ) control across all the cylinders of an engine is confounded by imbalances which include fuel-injector flow variations, fresh-air intake maldistribution and uneven distribution of Exhaust Gas Re-circulation (EGR). Moreover, in markets that are growing increasingly cost conscious, with ever tightening emissions regulations, correcting for such mismatches must not only be done, but done at little or no additional cost. To address this challenge, we developed an Individual Cylinder Fuel Control (ICFC) algorithm that estimates each cylinder's individual ϕ and then compensates to correct for any imbalance using only existing production hardware. Prior work in this area exists1,2, yet all disclosed production-intent work was performed using wide-range oxygen sensors, representing cost increases.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0991
Jean J. Botti, Carl E. Miller
Tomorrow's winning powertrain solutions reside in those technology combinations providing optimized propulsion systems with zero emissions and no cost or performance penalty compared with today's vehicles. The recent Kyoto Protocol for CO2 reduction and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) thrust for zero emission vehicles along with the European Regulatory community, motivate car manufacturers to adopt new light body structures with low aerodynamic drag coefficients, low-rolling resistance and the highest efficiency powertrains. The environmental equation expresses car manufacturers aptitude and desire to create zero emission vehicles at acceptable levels of performance unlike limited range electrical powered vehicle products. The cheapest solution to the environmental equation remains the conventional internal combustion engine ($30 to $50 per kW).
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0206
Peter M. Olin, Peter J. Maloney
A Barometric Pressure Estimator (BPE) algorithm was implemented in a production speed-density Engine Management System (EMS). The BPE is a model-based, easily calibrated algorithm for estimating barometric pressure using a standard set of production sensors, thereby avoiding the need for a barometric pressure sensor. An accurate barometric pressure value is necessary for a variety of engine control functions. By starting with the physics describing the flow through the induction system, an algorithm was developed which is simple to understand and implement. When used in conjunction with the Pneumatic and Thermal State Estimator (PSE and TSE) algorithms [2], the BPE requires only a single additional calibration table, generated with an automated processing routine, directly from measured engine data collected at an arbitrary elevation, in-vehicle or on a dynamometer. The algorithm has been implemented on several different engines.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0819
Sanket Amberkar, Mark Kushion, Kirt Eschtruth, Farhad Bolourchi
Electric power steering (EPS) is an advanced steering system that uses an electric motor to provide steering assist. Being a new technology it lacks the extensive operational history of conventional steering systems. Also conventional systems cannot be used to command an output independent of the driver input. In contrast EPS, by means of an electric motor, could be used to do so. As a result EPS systems may have additional failure modes, which need to be studied. In this paper we will consider the requirements for successful EPS operation. The steps required to develop diagnostics based on the requirements are also discussed. The results of this paper have been implemented in various EPS-based programs.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0888
Joon-Ho Yoo, Joseph V. Bonadies, Eric Detwiler, Mitch Ober, Dennis Reed
It is well known that hydrocarbon reduction during a cold start is a major issue in achieving ultra low emissions standards. This paper describes one of the possible approaches for reducing the cold-start hydrocarbon emissions by using a fast “light-off” planar oxygen sensor. The goal of this study was to verify the operation characteristics of Delphi's fast “light-off” planar oxygen sensor's (INTELLEK OSP) operating characteristics and the closed-loop performance for achieving improved hydrocarbon control for stringent emission standards. Tests were conducted in open-loop and closed-loop mode under steady and transient conditions using a 1996 model year 2.4-liter DOHC in-line 4-cylinder engine with a close-coupled catalytic converter. Overall performance of the OSP showed relatively quick reaction time to reach the operating temperature.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0939
In Kwang Yoo, Kenneth Simpson, Myron Bell, Stephen Majkowski
A coolant temperature model of an internal combustion engine has been formulated to meet the new On-Board Diagnostics II (OBD II) requirement for coolant temperature rationality. The model utilizes information available within the production Engine Control Module (ECM). The temperature prediction capability has been tested for various “real-world” driving conditions and cycles along with regulated drive cycles. The model can be calibrated to find the appropriate timing for initiation of a diagnostic algorithm for engine cooling system and Coolant Temperature Sensor (CTS) faults. A diagnostic scheme has been developed to detect and isolate various types of cooling system failures using engine soak time information available from a low power timer in the ECM.
2000-04-02
Technical Paper
2000-01-1532
Ronald J Krefta, Kaushik Rajashekara, Bruce Moor
This paper summarizes the results of an investigation of high risk, high potential technologies for hybrid vehicle drive applications and investigate potential solutions for the technical risk items associated with these technologies. The study consisted of the design, build, and test of different types of electric machines to understand their performance, efficiency, and manufacturability to develop hybrid vehicles with cost and performance similar to the present day IC engine based vehicles, but with lower emissions and better fuel economy. Machine technologies examined include synchronous reluctance, permanent magnet, and switched reluctance. Test data for various machine technologies is presented along with a discussion of the technical risk associated with each technology.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-1364
David K. S. Chen, Partab Jeswani, Joe Z. Li
Optimization of the mechanical aspects of a heated conical oxygen sensor for desired performances, such as low heater power, good poison resistance, fast light-off, and broad temperature range, etc. was achieved with computer modeling. CFD analysis was used to model the flow field in and around a sensor in an exhaust pipe to predict the convection coefficients, poisoning, and switching time. Heat transfer analysis coupled with electrical heating was applied to predict temperature and light-off time. Results of the optimization are illustrated, with good agreements between modeling and testing.
2000-08-21
Technical Paper
2000-01-3088
Darrell Herling, Monty Smith, Suresh Baskaran, Joachim Kupe
With new legislation and federal regulation for vehicle emission levels, automotive and truck manufacturers have been prompted to focus on emission control technologies that limit the level of exhaust pollutants. One of the primary pollutants, especially from diesel engines, is oxides of nitrogen (NOx). One possible solution to this pollution challenge is to design a more efficient internal combustion engine, which would require better engine operating parameter controls. However, there are limitations associated with such tight engine management. This need has led researchers and engineers to focus on the development of exhaust aftertreatment devices that will reduce NOx emissions with current diesel engines. An optimum aftertreatment device must be unaffected by exhaust-gas impurity poisoning such as sulfur products, and must have minimal impact on vehicle operations and fuel economy.
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