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2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2186
M. Cagri Cevik, Hendrik Hermann, Carl Ritterskamp
Calculating the bearing reliability and behavior is one of the primary tasks which have to be performed to define the main dimensions of the cranktrain of an internal combustion engine. Since the bearing results are essential for the pre-layout of the cranktrain, the conclusion on the bearing safety should be met as early as possible. Therefore detailed simulations like T-EHD or EHD analysis may not be applied to define the dimensions in such an early development phase. In the frame of this study a prediction methodology, based on a HD bearing approach, for bearing reliability of inline-4 crankshafts of passenger cars is proposed. In this way not only the design phase is shortened but also achieving the optimal solution is simplified. Moreover the requirement of a CAD model is eliminated for the preliminary design phase. The influencing parameters on the bearing behavior are first selected and divided into two groups: geometry and loading.
2010-09-28
Technical Paper
2010-32-0037
Reza Rezaei, Stefan Pischinger, Jens Ewald, Philipp Adomeit
The fulfillment of the aggravated demands on future small-size High-Speed Direct Injection (HSDI) Diesel engines requires next to the optimization of the injection system and the combustion chamber also the generation of an optimal in-cylinder swirl charge motion. To evaluate different port concepts for modern HSDI Diesel engines, usually quantities as the in-cylinder swirl ratio and the flow coefficient are determined, which are measured on a steady-state flow test bench. It has been shown that different valve lift strategies nominally lead to similar swirl levels. However, significant differences in combustion behavior and engine-out emissions give rise to the assumption that local differences in the in-cylinder flow structure caused by different valve lift strategies have noticeable impact. In this study an additional criterion, the homogeneity of the swirl flow, is introduced and a new approach for a quantitative assessment of swirl flow pattern is presented.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2119
Andreas Janssen, Martin Muether, Andreas Kolbeck, Matthias Lamping, Stefan Pischinger
Within the Cluster of Excellence “Tailor-Made Fuels from Biomass” at RWTH Aachen University, the Institute for Combustion Engines carried out an investigation program to explore the potential of future biofuel components in Diesel blends. In this paper, thermodynamic single cylinder engine results of today's and future biofuel components are presented with respect to their engine-out emissions and engine efficiency. The investigations were divided into two phases: In the first phase, investigations were performed with rapeseed oil methyl ester (B100) and an Ethanol-Gasoline blend (E85). In order to analyze the impact of different fuel blends, mixtures with 10 vol-% of B100 or E85 and 90 vol-% of standardized EN590 Diesel were investigated. Due to the low cetane number of E85, it cannot be used purely in a Diesel engine.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0591
Philipp Adomeit, Rolf Weinowski, Jens Ewald, Andre Brunn, Henning Kleeberg, Dean Tomazic, Stefan Pischinger, Markus Jakob
Advanced technologies such as direct injection DI, turbocharging and variable valve timing, have lead to a significant evolution of the gasoline engine with positive effects on driving pleasure, fuel consumption and emissions. Today's developments are primarily focused on the implementation of improved full load characteristics for driving performance and fuel consumption reduction with stoichiometric operation, following the downsizing approach in combination with turbocharging and high specific power. The requirements of a relatively small cylinder displacement with high specific power and a wide flexibility of DI injection specifications lead to competing development targets and additionally to a high number of degrees of freedom during optimization. In order to successfully approach an optimum solution, FEV has evolved an advanced development methodology, which is based on the combination of simulation, optical diagnostics and engine thermodynamics testing.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0499
Taner Gocmez, Ozen Ozdemir, Sven Lauer
The steady increase of engine power and the demand of lightweight design along with enhanced reliability require an optimized dimensioning process, especially in cylinder head valve bridge, which is progressively prone to cracking. The problems leading to valve bridge cracking are high temperatures and temperature gradients on one hand and high mechanical restraining on the other hand. The accurate temperature estimation at the valve bridge center has significant outcomes for valve bridge thickness and width optimization. This paper presents a 1D heat transfer model, which is constructed through the cross section of the valve bridge center by the use of well known quasi-stationary heat convection and conduction equations and reduced from 3D to 1D via regression and empirical weighting coefficients. Several diesel engine cylinder heads with different application types and materials are used for model setup and verification.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0333
Yousef Jeihouni, Stefan Pischinger, Ludger Ruhkamp, Thomas Koerfer
Fuel properties are always considered as one of the main factors to diesel engines concerning performance and emission discussions. There are still challenges for researchers to identify the most correlating and non-correlating fuel properties and their effects on engine behavior. Statistical analyses have been applied in this study to derive the most un-correlating properties. In parallel, sensitivity analysis was performed for the fuel properties as well as to the emission and performance of the engine. On one hand, two different analyses were implemented; one with consideration of both, non-aromatic and aromatic fuels, and the other were performed separately for each individual fuel group. The results offer a different influence on each type of analysis. Finally, by considering both methods, most common correlating and non-correlating properties have been derived.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0737
Michael Kind, Andreas Kolbeck, Matthias Lamping, Dorothea Liebig, Richard Clark, Andrew Harrison, Rene Van Doorn
GTL (Gas-To-Liquid) fuel is well known to improve tailpipe emissions when fuelling a conventional diesel vehicle, that is, one optimized to conventional fuel. This investigation assesses the additional potential for GTL fuel in a GTL-dedicated vehicle. This potential for GTL fuel was quantified in an EU 4 6-cylinder serial production engine. In the first stage, a comparison of engine performance was made of GTL fuel against conventional diesel, using identical engine calibrations. Next, adaptations enabled the full potential of GTL fuel within a dedicated calibration to be assessed. For this stage, two optimization goals were investigated: - Minimization of NOx emissions and - Minimization of fuel consumption. For each optimization the boundary condition was that emissions should be within the EU5 level. An additional constraint on the latter strategy required noise levels to remain within the baseline reference.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0650
Stefan Klopstein, Sven Lauer, Franz Maassen
Thermal management describes measures that result in the improved engine or vehicle operation in terms of energetics and thermo mechanics. In this context the involvement of the entire power train becomes more important as the interaction between engine, transmission and temperature sensitive battery package (of hybrid vehicles or electric vehicles with range extender) or the utilization of exhaust gas thermal energy play a major role for future power train concepts. The aim of thermal management strategies is to reduce fuel consumption while simultaneously increasing the comfort under consideration of all temperature limits. In this case it is essential to actively control the heat flow, in order to attain the optimal temperature distribution in the power train components.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-1275
Marcus Gohl, Sven Brandt, Michael Wittler, Matthias Budde, Gunter Knoll, Sven Krause, Stefan Pischinger, Christian Stein, Philipp Adomeit, Gerhard Matz, Frank Schlerege
Partly competing objectives, as low fuel consumption, low friction, long oil maintenance rate, and at the same time lowest exhaust emissions have to be fulfilled. Diminishing resources, continuously reduced development periods, and shortened product cycles yield detailed knowledge about oil consumption mechanisms in combustion engines to be essential. There are different ways for the lubricating oil to enter the combustion chamber: for example as blow-by gas, leakage past valve stem seals, piston rings (reverse blow-by) and evaporation from the cylinder liner wall and the combustion chamber. For a further reduction of oil consumption the investigation of these mechanisms has become more and more important. In this paper the influence of the mixture formation and the resulting fuel content in the cylinder liner wall film on the lubricant oil emission was examined.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-1272
Oliver Ruetten, Stefan Pischinger, Carsten Küpper, Rolf Weinowski, David Gian, Dmitry Ignatov, Winston Betton, Michael Bahn
This paper describes an alternative catalyst aging process using a hot gas test stand for thermal aging. The solution presented is characterized by a burner technology that is combined with a combustion enhancement, which allows stoichiometric and rich operating conditions to simulate engine exhaust gases. The resulting efficiency was increased and the operation limits were broadened, compared to combustion engines that are typically used for catalyst aging. The primary modification that enabled this achievement was the recirculation of exhaust gas downstream from catalyst back to the burner. The burner allows the running simplified dynamic durability cycles, which are the standard bench cycle that is defined by the legislation as alternative aging procedure and the fuel shut-off simulation cycle ZDAKW. The hot gas test stand approach has been compared to the conventional engine test bench method.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1317
Michael Neitz, Shen Jie, Zhuo Song Fang, Qin Wen, Wei Wenxue, Qin Zhuangge
The Yuchai F-6113 is an inline 6-cylinder heavy duty Diesel engine, mainly for truck application with a displacement of 8.4 liters and a rated power of 258 kW. It was derived from the F-6108 with a displacement of 7.3 liters. The boundary conditions for the new crankcase were set by the existing machining line. Substantially increasing the bore diameter while keeping the bore pitch constant, was achieved by replacing the conventional top stop liner with a mid stop liner with open deck. This liner concept is rather unique for heavy duty truck engines. The two 2-valve cylinder heads, covering 3 cylinders each, were replaced by a 4-valve one-piece cylinder head. The design comprises an electronically controlled Unit Pump Injection System (UPS) with the alternative to use an inline injection pump. The engine structure was laid out for the high specific output and the peak cylinder pressure requirements for the compliance with Euro III emission legislation.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1294
Anders Palmqvist, Edward Jobson, Lennart Andersson, Roland Granbro, Marcus Wendin, Lucas Megas, Patrick Nisius, Andreas Wiartalla, Gerhard Lepperhoff, Phil Blakeman, Thomas Ilkenhans, Dennis Webster, Gunnar Haeffler, Patrick Van de Voorde, Peter Schmidt-Zhang, Ulrich Guth, Mikaela Wallin
The European research co-operation Lotus is presented. The main objectives of the project were i) to show the potential for a urea-based SCR system to comply with the EU standard of years 2005 and 2008 for heavy-duty Diesel engines for different driving conditions with optimal fuel consumption, ii) to reach 95 % conversion of NOx at steady state at full load on a Euro III engine, iii) to reach 75 % NOx reduction for exhaust temperatures between 200-300°C, and 85 % average NOx reduction between 200-500°C. The energy content of the consumed urea should not exceed 1.0 %, calculated as specific fuel consumption. These targets were met in May 2003 and the Lotus SCR system fulfilled the Euro V NOx legislative objectives for year 2008.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0694
A. G. Konstandopoulos, D. Zarvalis, E. Papaioannou, N. D. Vlachos, G. Boretto, M. F. Pidria, P. Faraldi, O. Piacenza, P. Prenninger, T. Cartus, H. Schreier, W. Brandstätter, C. Wassermayr, G. Lepperhof, V. Scholz, B. Luers, J. Schnitzler, M. Claussen, A. Wollmann, M. Maly, G. Tsotridis, B. M. Vaglieco, S. S. Merola, D. Webster, D. Bergeal, C. Görsmann, H. Obernosterer, D. Fino, N. Russo, G. Saracco, V. Specchia, N. Moral, A. D'Anna, A. D'Alessio, R. Zahoransky, E. Laile, S. Schmidt, M. Ranalli
The DEXA Cluster consisted of three closely interlinked projects. In 2003 the DEXA Cluster concluded by demonstrating the successful development of critical technologies for Diesel exhaust particulate after-treatment, without adverse effects on NOx emissions and maintaining the fuel economy advantages of the Diesel engine well beyond the EURO IV (2000) emission standards horizon. In the present paper the most important results of the DEXA Cluster projects in the demonstration of advanced particulate control technologies, the development of a simulation toolkit for the design of diesel exhaust after-treatment systems and the development of novel particulate characterization methodologies, are presented. The motivation for the DEXA Cluster research was to increase the market competitiveness of diesel engine powertrains for passenger cars worldwide, and to accelerate the adoption of particulate control technology.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0994
Stefan Pischinger, Christof Schernus, Georg Lütkemeyer, H. J. Theuerkauf, Thomas Winsel, Mohamed Ayeb
The modern engine development process is characterized by shorter development cycles and a reduced number of prototypes. However, simultaneously exhaust after-treatment and emission testing is becoming increasingly more sophisticated. It is expected that predictive simulation tools that encompass the entire powertrain can potentially improve the efficiency of the calibration process. The testing of an ECU using a HiL system requires a real-time model. Additionally, if the initial parameters of the ECU are to be defined and tested, the model has to be more accurate than is typical for ECU functional testing. It is possible to enhance the generalization capability of the simulation, with neuronal network sub-models embedded into the architecture of a physical model, while still maintaining real-time execution. This paper emphasizes the experimental investigation and physical modeling of the port fuel injected SI engine.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1284
Philipp Adomeit, Markus Jakob, Stefan Pischinger, Andre Brunn, Jens Ewald
The application of technologies such as direct injection, turbo charging and variable valve timing has caused a significant evolution of the gasoline engine with positive effects on fuel consumption and emissions. The current developments are primarily focused on the realization of improved full load characteristics and fuel consumption reduction with stoichiometric operation, following the downsizing approach in combination with turbo charging and high specific power. The requirements of high specific power in a relatively small cylinder displacement and a wide range of DI injection specifications lead to competing development targets and to a high number of degrees of freedom during engine layout and optimization. One of the major targets is to assess the stability of the combustion system in the early development phase.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1391
Philipp Adomeit, Markus Jakob, Andreas Kolbeck, Stefan Pischinger
The requirement of reducing worldwide CO₂ emissions and engine pollutants are demanding an increased use of bio-fuels. Ethanol with its established production technology can contribute to this goal. However, due to its resistive auto-ignition behavior the use of ethanol-based fuels is limited to the spark-ignited gasoline combustion process. For application to the compression-ignited diesel combustion process advanced ignition systems are required. In general, ethanol offers a significant potential to improve the soot emission behavior of the diesel engine due to its oxygen content and its enhanced evaporation behavior. In this contribution the ignition behavior of ethanol and mixtures with high ethanol content is investigated in combination with advanced ignition systems with ceramic glow-plugs under diesel engine relevant thermodynamic conditions in a high pressure and temperature vessel.
2011-08-30
Journal Article
2011-01-1991
Matthias Thewes, Martin Muther, Adrien Brassat, Stefan Pischinger, Andreas Sehr
In this study the fuel influence of several bio-fuel candidates on homogeneous engine combustion systems with direct injection is investigated. The results reveal Ethanol and 2-Butanol as the two most knock-resistant fuels. Hence these two fuels enable the highest efficiency improvements versus RON95 fuel ranging from 3.6% - 12.7% for Ethanol as a result of a compression ratio increase of 5 units. Tetrahydro-2-methylfuran has a worse knock resistance and a decreased thermal efficiency due to the required reduction in compression ratio by 1.5 units. The enleanment capability is similar among all fuels thus they pose no improvements for homogeneous lean burn combustion systems despite a significant reduction in NOX emissions for the alcohol fuels as a consequence of lower combustion temperatures.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-2097
A. Wiartalla, L. Ruhkamp, Y. Rosefort, F. Maassen, B. Sliwinski, T. Schnorbus, T. Laible
From current point of view future emission legislations for heavy-duty engines as well as industrial engines will require complex engine internal measures in combination with sophisticated aftertreatment systems as well as according control strategies to reach the emission targets. With EU VI, JP 09/NLT and US10 for heavy-duty engines as well as future Tier4 final or stage IV emission legislation for industrial applications, EGR + DPF + SCR probably will be combined for most applications and therefore quite similar technological approaches will be followed up in Europe as well as in the US and in Japan. Most “emerging markets” all over the world follow up the European, US or Japanese emission legislation with a certain time delay. Therefore similar technologies need to be introduced in these markets in the future. On the other hand specific market boundary conditions and requirements have to be considered for the development of tailored system concepts in these markets.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0865
Michael Breuer, Christof Schernus, Robert Böwing, André Kuphal, Stefan Lieske
A uniform flow distribution at converter inlet is one of the fundamental requirements to meet high catalytic efficiency. Commonly used tools for optimization of the inlet flow distribution are flow measurements as well as CFD analysis. This paper puts emphasis on the experimental procedures and results. The interaction of flow measurements and CFD is outlined. The exhaust gas flow is transient, compressible and hot, making in-situ flow measurements very complex. On the other hand, to utilize the advantages of flow testing at steady-state and cold conditions the significance of these results has to be verified first. CFD analysis under different boundary conditions prove that - in a first approach - the flow situation can be regarded as a sequence of successive, steady-state situations. Using the Reynolds analogy a formula for the steady-state, cold test mass flow is derived, taking into account the cylinder displacement and the rated speed.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0990
Hermann-Josef Ecker, Markus Schwaderlapp, Dave K. Gill
Due to the future application of combustion engines in small and hybrid vehicles, the demand for high efficiency with low mass and compact engine design is of prime importance. The diesel engine, with its outstanding thermal efficiency, is a well suited candidate for such applications. In order to realize these targets, future diesel engines will need to have increasingly higher specific output combined with increased power to weight ratios. This is therefore driving the need for new designs of 3 and/or 4 cylinder, small bore engines of low displacement, sub 1.5l. Recent work on combustion development, has shown that combustion systems, ports, valves and injector sizes are available for bore sizes down to 65 mm.
1999-08-17
Technical Paper
1999-01-2896
M. Umierski, Th. Körfer, P. Stommel
Today, natural gas engines for stationary and vehicular applications are not only faced with stringent emission legislation, but also with increasing requirements for power density and efficient fuel consumption. For vehicular use, downsizing is an advantageous approach to lowering on-road fuel consumption and making gas engines more competitive with their diesel counterparts. In SI-engines, the power density at a given compression ratio is limited by knocking, or NOx emissions. A decrease in compression ratio, lowering both NOx emissions and the risk of knocking combustion, increases fuel consumption. An increase in air-fuel-ratio, required to avoid knocking at higher thermal loading, increases boost pressure, HC and CO emissions, and mechanical loading and causes the danger of misfiring. As a result, the performance of the latest production gas engines for vehicles remains at a BMEP of 18…20 bar with a NOx emission level of 2…5 g/kWh.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0257
Henning Baumgarten, José Geiger, Peter Wolters
The development of new passenger car powertrains with gasoline direct injection engines is facing new requirements which result from the need of different operational modes with stratified and homogeneous air fuel mixture. Moreover, the exhaust aftertreatment system causes a discontinuous operation with lean burn adsorption periods followed by short rich spikes for catalyst regeneration. Recent work on combustion system development has shown, that gasoline direct injection can create significant fuel economy benefits. Charge motion controlled combustion systems have proven to be of advantage in terms of low raw emissions compared to wall guided concepts. Based on an initial single-cylinder development phase a multi-cylinder engine was realized with excellent fuel economy, low raw emissions and operational robustness. Finally, the new engine's potential has been demonstrated in a mid-class vehicle.
2011-09-11
Technical Paper
2011-24-0176
Sharareh Honardar, Hartwig Busch, Thorsten Schnorbus, Christopher Severin, Andreas F. Kolbeck, Thomas Korfer
Both, the continuous strengthening of the exhaust emission legislation and the striving for a substantial reduction of carbon dioxide output in the traffic sector depict substantial requirements for the development of future diesel engines. These engines will comprise not only the mandatory diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and particulate filter DPF but a NOx aftertreatment system as well - at least for heavier vehicles. The oxidation catalysts as well as currently available NOx aftertreatment technologies, i.e., LNT and SCR, rely on sufficient exhaust gas temperatures to achieve a proper conversion. This is getting more and more critical due to the fact that today's and future measures for CO₂ reduction will result in further decrease of engine-out temperatures. Additionally this development has to be considered in the light of further engine electrification and hybridization scenarios.
2011-09-11
Technical Paper
2011-24-0171
Andreas F. Kolbeck
Both, the continuous strengthening of the exhaust emission legislation and the striving for a substantial reduction of the carbon dioxide output in the traffic sector depict substantial requirements for the global automotive industry and especially for the engine manufacturers. From the multiplicity of possible approaches and strategies for clear compliance with these demands, engine internal measures offer a large and, eventually more important, very economical potential. For example, the achievements in fuel injection technology are a measure which in the last years has contributed significantly to a notable reduction of the emissions of the modern DI Diesel engines at favorable fuel efficiency. Besides the application of modern fuel injection technology, the linked combustion control (Closed Loop Combustion Control) opens possibilities for a further optimization of the combustion process.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0922
Andreas Küsters, Franz J. Maassen
During the past years, there has been an increasing tendency to seriously question and break up old and ingrained structures in combustion engine testing. The reason for this is the continuously increasing number of engine and vehicle variants and a variety of applications resulting from it, which significantly push up development costs and times when carrying out the classical testing patterns. The following article by FEV Motorentechnik GmbH introduces a comprehensive test methodology for purposeful endurance testing of modern drive units (in particular from the fields of passenger cars and commercial vehicles). The procedure and the testing philosophy are explained in detail, illustrated by a concrete development example.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0949
Mehmet Cagri Cevik, Martin Rebbert, Franz Maassen
This paper introduces a new approach based on a statistical investigation and finite element analysis (FEA) methodology to predict the crankshaft torsional stiffness and stress concentration factors (SCF) due to torsion and bending which can be used as inputs for simplified crankshaft multibody models and durability calculations. In this way the reduction of the development time and effort of passenger car crankshafts in the pre-layout phase is intended with a least possible accuracy sacrifice. With the designated methodology a better approximation to reality is reached for crank torsional stiffness and SCF due to torsion and bending compared with the empirical approaches, since the prediction does not depend on the component tests with limited numbers of specimen, as in empirical equations, but on various FE calculations.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0659
Franz Maassen, Werner Bick, Frank Haubner
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0762
O. Lang, W. Salber, J. Hahn, Stefan Pischinger, K. Hortmann, C. Bücker
Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI) as a promising future combustion process is a concept to strongly reduce fuel consumption as well as NOx emissions. The acceptance and the potential of this combustion process depends on the possible CAI operation range in the engine map and the fuel consumption benefit, as well as the complexity of the variable valve train which is necessary to realize the CAI combustion process. The thermodynamic investigations presented in this paper were done on an engine equipped with an electromechanical valve train (EMVT), featuring Port Fuel Injection (PFI) and direct Injection. They show that the electromechanical valve train is an excellent platform for developing the CAI process. Controlled Auto Ignition has been realized with port fuel injection in a speed range between 1000 and 4500 rpm and in a load range between approximately 1 and 6 bar BMEP (about 5 bar BMEP for pressure gradients lower than 3 bar/°CA) depending on engine speed.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1611
Erwin Reichert, Dirk Rompf, Werner Bick
Nowadays internal combustion engine design is characterized by a faster development time with increased levels of quality, NVH, specific power and lower weight all being demanded at a lower production cost. This requires a new and systemic design management from the outset of the concept to SOP (Start of Production). The design for Six Sigma (DFSS) process is the surest way to achieve the above mentioned development goals. Within a Six Sigma approach, manufacturing and serial production issues are considered from the beginning of the development phase. Based on examples, the methodology will be explained in single steps. The explanation will include QFD, FMEA (product and process), scorecards, DOE and kneading process with its tolerance analysis and process capability investigations. The use of these different tools for each phase of the design process will be described.
2010-06-09
Technical Paper
2010-01-1402
Georg Eisele, Klaus Wolff, Michael Wittler, Roozbeh Abtahi, Stefan Pischinger
The technology used in hybrid vehicle concepts is significantly different from conventional vehicle technology with consequences also for the noise and vibration behavior. In conventional vehicles, certain noise phenomena are masked by the engine noise. In situations where the combustion engine is turned off in hybrid vehicle concepts, these noise components can become dominant and annoying. In hybrid concepts, the driving condition is often decoupled from the operation state of the combustion engine, which leads to unusual and unexpected acoustical behavior. New acoustic phenomena such as magnetic noise due to recuperation occur, caused by new components and driving conditions. The analysis of this recuperation noise by means of interior noise simulation shows, that it is not only induced by the powertrain radiation but also by the noise path via the powertrain mounts. The additional degrees of freedom of the hybrid drive train can also be used to improve the vibrational behavior.
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