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Viewing 1 to 18 of 18
1983-02-01
Technical Paper
830397
William J. Evans, Charles Haddad
The SS Bumper is a new concept in automobile systems that achieves a very significant weight reduction in steel bumper construction and is capable of meeting the 5 mph FMVSS U.S. Government impact standard. It offers a low cost method of achieving a double digit weight reduction with no cost premium for aluminum or plastic materials. This paper concentrates on describing the configuration of the SS Bumper and a simple, easy to apply procedure for car application which includes discrete equations for bending strengths, torsional strength and the new dent strength relationships which have been recently developed. One version of the SS Bumper applied to the 1983 Thunderbird is also described.
1982-02-01
Technical Paper
820494
B. E. Lampinen, R. A. Jeryan
Future vehicle safety, performance and fuel economy objectives make the development of new materials, concepts and methods of crash energy management desirable. The technique of foam filling structural rails for increased energy absorption was investigated as one such concept. A fractional factorial test program was established to evaluate the weight effectiveness of polyurethane foam as an energy absorber and stabilizer. The experiment provided the quantitative effects of design parameter, varability of results and statistical significance of each parameter with regard to crash characteristics. High density foam was found to be weight effective as a structural reinforcement, but not as an energy absorber. Medium density foam improves the energy absorption of a section. Equivalent energy, however, can be absorbed more weight effectively by changing the metal thickness or the section size.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0556
Wenkai Li, Haitao Cui, Weidong Wen, Xuming Su, Carlos Engler-Pinto
Abstract Ultrasonic fatigue tests (testing frequency around 20 kHz) have been conducted on four different cast aluminum alloys each with a distinct composition, heat treatment, and microstructure. Tests were performed in dry air, laboratory air and submerged in water. For some alloys, the ultrasonic fatigue lives were dramatically affected by the environment humidity. The effects of different factors like material composition, yield strength, secondary dendrite arm spacing and porosity were investigated; it was concluded that the material strength may be the key factor influencing the environmental humidity effect in ultrasonic fatigue testing. Further investigation on the effect of chemical composition, especially copper content, is needed.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0557
Katherine Avery, Jwo Pan, Carlos Engler-Pinto
Abstract High silicon molybdenum (HiSiMo) ductile cast iron (DCI) is commonly used for high temperature engine components, such as exhaust manifolds, which are also subjected to severe thermal cycles during vehicle operation. It is imperative to understand the thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) behavior of HiSiMo DCI to accurately predict the durability of high temperature engine components. In this paper, the effect of the minimum temperature of a TMF cycle on TMF life and failure behavior is investigated. Tensile and low cycle fatigue data are first presented for temperatures up to 800°C. Next, TMF data are presented for maximum temperatures of 800°C and minimum cycle temperatures ranging from 300 to 600°C. The data show that decreasing the minimum temperature has a detrimental effect on TMF life. The Smith-Watson-Topper parameter applied at the maximum temperature of the TMF cycle is found to correlate well with out-of-phase (OP) TMF life for all tested minimum temperatures.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0698
Danielle Zeng, Li Lu, Jin Zhou, Yang Li, Z. Xia, Paul Hoke, Kurt Danielson, Dustin Souza
Abstract Long fiber reinforced plastics (LFRP) have exhibited superior mechanical performance and outstanding design flexibility, bringing them with increasing popularity in the automotive structural design. Due to the injection molding process, the distribution of long fibers varies at different locations throughout the part, resulting in anisotropic and non-uniform mechanical properties of the final LFRP parts. Images from X-ray CT scan of the materials show that local volume fraction of the long fibers tends to be higher at core than at skin layer. Also fibers are bundled and tangled to form clusters. Most of the current micromechanical material models used for LFRP are extended from those for short fibers without adequate validation. The effect of the complexity of long fibers on the material properties is not appropriately considered.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0598
Xiaona Li, Changqing Du, Yongjun Zhou, Xin Xie, Xu Chen, Yaqian Zheng, Thomas Ankofski, Rodrigue Narainen, Cedric Xia, Thomas Stoughton, Lianxiang Yang
Abstract Accurate determination of the forming limit strain of aluminum sheet metal is an important topic which has not been fully solved by industry. Also, the effects of draw beads (enhanced forming limit behaviors), normally reported on steel sheet metals, on aluminum sheet metal is not fully understood. This paper introduces an experimental study on draw bead effects on aluminum sheet metals by measuring the forming limit strain zero (FLD0) of the sheet metal. Two kinds of aluminum, AL 6016-T4 and AL 5754-0, are used. Virgin material, 40% draw bead material and 60% draw bead material conditions are tested for each kind of aluminum. Marciniak punch tests were performed to create a plane strain condition. A dual camera Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system was used to record and measure the deformation distribution history during the punch test. The on-set necking timing is determined directly from surface shape change. The FLD0 of each test situation is reported in this article.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0553
Yu Zhang, Weiqin Tang, Dayong Li, Xuming Su, Shiyao Huang, Yandong Shi, Yinghong Peng
SIF value around weld nugget changes when specimen width is different. To investigate the influence of specimen width on SIF value around weld nugget of coach peel specimen (CP), a finite element model was established in this paper. In this model, a contour integral crack was used, and the area around the nugget was treated as crack tip. Results indicated that when specimen width was below 50mm, SIF decreased rapidly with the increase of specimen width. When specimen width was larger than 50mm, SIF almost remained constant with the variation of specimen width. To further study the influences of nugget diameter and sheet thickness on the Width-SIF curves, CP specimens with different nugget diameters (5mm, 6mm and 7mm) and sheet thicknesses (1.2mm, 1.6mm and 2.0mm) were established in ABAQUS. Simulation results of all CP specimens showed a similar relationship between specimen width and SIF.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0445
Ramakrishna P. Koganti, Adrian Elliott, Donald F. Maatz
There has been a substantial increase in the use of advanced high strength steel (AHSS) in automotive structures in the last few years. The usage of these materials is projected to grow significantly in the next 5-10 years with the introduction of new safety and fuel economy regulations. AHSS are gaining popularity due to their superior mechanical properties and use in parts for weight savings potential, as compared to mild steels. These new materials pose significant manufacturing challenges, particularly for welding and stamping. Proper understanding of the weldability of these materials is critical for successful application on future vehicle programs. Due to the high strength nature of AHSS materials, higher weld forces and longer weld times are often needed to weld these advanced strength steels.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0644
Kyoo Sil Choi, Dongsheng Li, Xin Sun, Mei Li, John Allison
In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0196
Hong Tae Kang, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Todd Link, John Bonnen, Mark Amaya, Hua-Chu Shih
Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) is widely employed for joining relatively thick sheet steels in automotive body-in-white structures and frames. The GMAW process is very flexible for various joint geometries and has relatively high welding speed. However, fatigue failures can occur at welded joints subjected to various types of loads. Thus, vehicle design engineers need to understand the fatigue characteristics of welded joints produced by GMAW. Currently, automotive structures employ various advanced high strength steels (AHSS) such as dual-phase (DP) and transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels to produce lighter vehicle structures with improved safety performance and fuel economy, and reduced harmful emissions. Relatively thick gages of AHSS are commonly joined to conventional high strength steels and/or mild steels using GMAW in current body-in-white structures and frames.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0192
Hong Tae Kang, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Mark Amaya, John Bonnen, Hua-Chu Shih, Shahuraj Mane, Todd Link
In the North American automotive industry, various advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are used to lighten vehicle structures, improve safety performance and fuel economy, and reduce harmful emissions. Relatively thick gages of AHSS are commonly joined to conventional high strength steels and/or mild steels using Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) in the current generation body-in-white structures. Additionally, fatigue failures are most likely to occur at joints subjected to a variety of different loadings. It is therefore critical that automotive engineers need to understand the fatigue characteristics of welded joints. The Sheet Steel Fatigue Committee of the Auto/Steel Partnership (A/S-P) completed a comprehensive fatigue study on GMAW joints of both AHSS and conventional sheet steels including: DP590 GA, SAE 1008, HSLA HR 420, DP 600 HR, Boron, DQSK, TRIP 780 GI, and DP780 GI steels.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0234
Gang Huang, Benda Yan, Z. Xia
The r-value is a very important parameter in the forming simulations of high strength steels, especially for steels with prominent anisotropy. R-values for sheet steels conventionally measured by extensometers were found neither consistent nor accurate due to difficulties in measuring the width strain. In this study, the Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique was applied to determine r-values in Longitudinal (L), Transverse (T) and Diagonal (D) directions for cold rolled DP980 GI, DP780 GI, DP600 GI and BH250 GI sheet steels. The r-values measured from DIC were validated by finite element analysis (FEA) of a uniaxial tensile test for BH250. The simulation results of the load-displacement for two plasticity models were compared to experimental data, with one being the isotropic yield (von-Mises) and the other being an anisotropic model (Hill-48) using the r-value measured from DIC.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-0920
Xin Zheng, Carlos Engler-Pinto, Xuming Su, Haitao Cui, Weidong Wen
High cycle fatigue tests at a constant positive mean stress have been performed on a Al-Si-Cu cast aluminum alloy. The Random Fatigue Limit (RFL) model was employed to fit the probabilistic S-N curves based on Maximum Likelihood Estimate (MLE). Fractographic studies indicated that fatigue cracks in most specimens initiate from oxide films located at or very close to specimen surface. The RFL model was proved to be able to accurately capture the scatter in fatigue life. The cumulative density function (CDF) of fatigue life determined by RFL fit is found to be approximately equal to the complementary value of the CDF of the near-surface fatigue initiator size.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-0044
Guofei Chen, Ming F. Shi, Tau Tyan
Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) have been widely accepted as a material of choice in the automotive industry to balance overall vehicle weight and stringent vehicle crash test performance targets. Combined with efficient use of geometry and load paths through shape and topology optimization, AHSS has enabled vehicle manufacturers to obtain the highest possible ratings in safety evaluations by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In this study, vehicle CAE side impact models were used to evaluate three side impact crash test conditions (IIHS side impact, NHTSA LINCAP and FMVSS 214 side pole) and the IIHS roof strength test condition and to identify several key components affecting the side impact test performance. HyperStudy® optimization software and LS-DYNA® nonlinear finite element software were utilized for shape and gauge optimization.
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650474
J. C. Widman
A twofold improvement in penetration resistance of laminated safety glass for use in vehicle windshields has been achieved. A new test procedure has been established which will provide better correlation of test conditions to accident conditions than present tests do. Present windshield material and the new safety glazings are compared.
2000-05-01
Technical Paper
2000-01-1626
Keith Van Gorder, Thomson David, Janet Basas
This paper will discuss the various tools used to measure the steering and suspension properties of a vehicle. Measuring the kinematic and compliance properties of the steering and suspension systems is an important part of the vehicle development process. Some of the ways these measurements are used include confirmation of vehicle design and build, to create and correlate CAE models, and for diagnosis of steering and handling concerns. Understanding exactly how the steering and suspension systems are performing is an important step in the development process. We have found that by employing the proper tools and methods, plus having a defined vehicle dynamics fingerprint process, that most issues and concerns can be successfully resolved.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-0978
Robert C. McCune, Joy Forsmark, Brian Schneider, Alan Luo, Helen Gu, William Schumacher, Xi Chen, Florina Vartolas
Corrosion tendency is one of the major inhibitors for increased use of magnesium alloys in automotive structural applications. Moreover, systematic or standardized methods for evaluation of both general and galvanic corrosion of magnesium alloys, either as individual components or eventually as entire subassemblies, remains elusive, and receives little attention from professional and standardization bodies. This work reports outcomes from an effort underway within the U.S. Automotive Materials Partnership - ‘USAMP’ (Chrysler, Ford and GM) directed toward enabling technologies and knowledge base for the design and fabrication of magnesium-intensive subassemblies intended for automotive “front end” applications. In particular, subassemblies consisting of three different grades of magnesium (die cast, sheet and extrusion) and receiving a typical corrosion protective coating were subjected to cyclic corrosion tests as employed by each OEM in the consortium.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620078
W. W. Fredericks
Viewing 1 to 18 of 18

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