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Viewing 1 to 30 of 32
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1466
Kerem Bayar, Ryan McGee, Hai Yu, Dale Crombez
This study presents the utilization of the hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) approach for regenerative braking (regen) control enhancement efforts for the power split hybrid vehicle architecture. The HIL stand used in this study includes a production brake control module along with the hydraulic brake system, constituted of an accelerator/brake pedal assembly, electric vacuum booster and pump, brake hydraulic circuit and four brake calipers. This work presents the validation of this HIL simulator with real vehicle data, during mild and heavy braking. Then by using the HIL approach, regen control is enhanced, specifically for two cases. The first case is the jerk in deceleration caused by the brake booster delay, during transitions from regen to friction braking. As an example, the case where the regen is ramped out at a low speed threshold, and the hydraulic braking ramped in, can be considered.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0533
Jianghui Mao, Carlos Engler-Pinto, Xuming Su
Abstract In this paper, thermal stress analysis for powertrain component is carried out using two in-house developed elasto-viscoplastic models (i.e. Chaboche model and Sehitoglu model) that are implemented into ABAQUS via its user subroutine UMAT. The model parameters are obtained from isothermal cyclic tests performed on standard samples under various combinations of strain rates and temperatures. Models' validity is verified by comparing to independent non-isothermal tests conducted on similar samples. Both models are applied to the numerical analysis of exhaust manifold subject to temperature cycling as a result of vehicle operation. Due to complexity, only four thermal cycles of heating-up and cooling-down are simulated. Results using the two material models are compared in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0443
Zhenfei Zhan, Junqi Yang, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang, Saeed Barbat, Ling Zheng
Abstract Computer programs and models are playing an increasing role in simulating vehicle crashworthiness, dynamic, and fuel efficiency. To maximize the effectiveness of these models, the validity and predictive capabilities of these models need to be assessed quantitatively. For a successful implementation of Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) models as an integrated part of the current vehicle development process, it is necessary to develop objective validation metric that has the desirable metric properties to quantify the discrepancy between multiple tests and simulation results. However, most of the outputs of dynamic systems are multiple functional responses, such as time history series. This calls for the development of an objective metric that can evaluate the differences of the multiple time histories as well as the key features under uncertainty.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0437
Zhendan Xue, Mariapia Marchi, Sumeet Parashar, Guosong Li
Abstract Robustness/Reliability Assessment and Optimization (RRAO) is often computationally expensive because obtaining accurate Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) may require a large number of design samples. This is especially true where computationally expensive high fidelity CAE simulations are involved. Approximation methods such as the Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) and other Response Surface Methods (RSM) have been used to reduce the number of time-consuming design samples needed. However, for certain types of problems require the RRAO, one of the first question to consider is which method can provide an accurate and affordable UQ for a given problem. To answer the question, this paper tests the PCE, RSM and pure sampling based approaches on each of the three selected test problems: the Ursem Waves mathematical function, an automotive muffler optimization problem, and a vehicle restraint system optimization problem.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0422
Zhao Liu, Ping Zhu, Wei Chen, Ren-Jye Yang
Abstract Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is a relatively new stochastic optimization algorithm and has gained much attention in recent years because of its fast convergence speed and strong optimization ability. However, PSO suffers from premature convergence problem for quick losing of diversity. That is to say, if no particle discovers a new superiority position than its previous best location, PSO algorithm will fall into stagnation and output local optimum result. In order to improve the diversity of basic PSO, design of experiment technique is used to initialize the particle swarm in consideration of its space-filling property which guarantees covering the design space comprehensively. And the optimization procedure of PSO is divided into two stages, optimization stage and improving stage. In the optimization stage, the basic PSO initialized by Optimal Latin hypercube technique is conducted.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0479
Hongyi Xu, Ching-Hung Chuang, Ren-Jye Yang
Abstract One of the major challenges in multiobjective, multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is the long computational time required in evaluating the new designs' performances. To shorten the cycle time of product design, a data mining-based strategy is developed to improve the efficiency of heuristic optimization algorithms. Based on the historical information of the optimization process, clustering and classification techniques are employed to identify and eliminate the low quality and repetitive designs before operating the time-consuming design evaluations. The proposed method improves design performances within the same computation budget. Two case studies, one mathematical benchmark problem and one vehicle side impact design problem, are conducted as demonstration.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0478
Kai Zheng, Ren-Jye Yang, Jie Hu
Abstract Design optimization methods are commonly used for weight reduction subjecting to multiple constraints in automotive industry. One of the major challenges remained is to deal with a large number of design variables for large-scale design optimization problems effectively. In this paper, a new approach based on fuzzy rough set is proposed to address this issue. The concept of rough set theory is to deal with redundant information and seek for a reduced design variable set. The proposed method first exploits fuzzy rough set to screen out the insignificant or redundant design variables with regard to the output functions, then uses the reduced design variable set for design optimization. A vehicle body structure is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method and compare with a traditional weighted sensitivity based main effect approach.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0455
Hao Pan, Zhimin Xi, Ren-Jye Yang
Abstract A copula-based approach for model bias characterization was previously proposed [18] aiming at improving prediction accuracy compared to other model characterization approaches such as regression and Gaussian Process. This paper proposes an adaptive copula-based approach for model bias identification to enhance the available methodology. The main idea is to use cluster analysis to preprocess data, then apply the copula-based approach using information from each cluster. The final prediction accumulates predictions obtained from each cluster. Two case studies will be used to demonstrate the superiority of the adaptive copula-based approach over its predecessor.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0452
Junqi Yang, Zhenfei Zhan, Chong Chen, Yajing Shu, Ling Zheng, Ren-Jye Yang, Yan Fu, Saeed Barbat
Abstract Simulation based design optimization has become the common practice in automotive product development. Increasing computer models are developed to simulate various dynamic systems. Before applying these models for product development, model validation needs to be conducted to assess their validity. In model validation, for the purpose of obtaining results successfully, it is vital to select or develop appropriate metrics for specific applications. For dynamic systems, one of the key obstacles of model validation is that most of the responses are functional, such as time history curves. This calls for the development of a metric that can evaluate the differences in terms of phase shift, magnitude and shape, which requires information from both time and frequency domain. And by representing time histories in frequency domain, more intuitive information can be obtained, such as magnitude-frequency and phase-frequency characteristics.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0453
Zhimin Xi, Hao Pan, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang
Abstract To date, model validation metric is prominently designed for non-dynamic model responses. Though metrics for dynamic responses are also available, they are specifically designed for the vehicle impact application and uncertainties are not considered in the metric. This paper proposes the validation metric for general dynamic system responses under uncertainty. The metric makes use of the popular U-pooling approach and extends it for dynamic responses. Furthermore, shape deviation metric was proposed to be included in the validation metric with the capability of considering multiple dynamic test data. One vehicle impact model is presented to demonstrate the proposed validation metric.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0698
Danielle Zeng, Li Lu, Jin Zhou, Yang Li, Z. Xia, Paul Hoke, Kurt Danielson, Dustin Souza
Abstract Long fiber reinforced plastics (LFRP) have exhibited superior mechanical performance and outstanding design flexibility, bringing them with increasing popularity in the automotive structural design. Due to the injection molding process, the distribution of long fibers varies at different locations throughout the part, resulting in anisotropic and non-uniform mechanical properties of the final LFRP parts. Images from X-ray CT scan of the materials show that local volume fraction of the long fibers tends to be higher at core than at skin layer. Also fibers are bundled and tangled to form clusters. Most of the current micromechanical material models used for LFRP are extended from those for short fibers without adequate validation. The effect of the complexity of long fibers on the material properties is not appropriately considered.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0553
Yu Zhang, Weiqin Tang, Dayong Li, Xuming Su, Shiyao Huang, Yandong Shi, Yinghong Peng
SIF value around weld nugget changes when specimen width is different. To investigate the influence of specimen width on SIF value around weld nugget of coach peel specimen (CP), a finite element model was established in this paper. In this model, a contour integral crack was used, and the area around the nugget was treated as crack tip. Results indicated that when specimen width was below 50mm, SIF decreased rapidly with the increase of specimen width. When specimen width was larger than 50mm, SIF almost remained constant with the variation of specimen width. To further study the influences of nugget diameter and sheet thickness on the Width-SIF curves, CP specimens with different nugget diameters (5mm, 6mm and 7mm) and sheet thicknesses (1.2mm, 1.6mm and 2.0mm) were established in ABAQUS. Simulation results of all CP specimens showed a similar relationship between specimen width and SIF.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0644
Kyoo Sil Choi, Dongsheng Li, Xin Sun, Mei Li, John Allison
In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1386
Zhenfei Zhan, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang
Finite Element (FE) models are widely used in automotive for vehicle design. Even with increasing speed of computers, the simulation of high fidelity FE models is still too time-consuming to perform direct design optimization. As a result, response surface models (RSMs) are commonly used as surrogates of the FE models to reduce the turn-around time. However, RSM may introduce additional sources of uncertainty, such as model bias, and so on. The uncertainty and model bias will affect the trustworthiness of design decisions in design processes. This calls for the development of stochastic model interpolation and extrapolation methods that can address the discrepancy between the RSM and the FE results, and provide prediction intervals of model responses under uncertainty.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1387
Zhimin Xi, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang
Model validation is a process of determining the degree to which a model is an accurate representation of the real world from the perspective of the intended uses of the model. In reliability based design, the intended use of the model is to identify an optimal design with the minimum cost function while satisfying all reliability constraints. It is pivotal that computational models should be validated before conducting the reliability based design. This paper presents an ensemble approach for model bias prediction in order to correct predictions of computational models. The basic idea is to first characterize the model bias of computational models, then correct the model prediction by adding the characterized model bias. The ensemble approach is composed of two prediction mechanisms: 1) response surface of model bias, and 2) Copula modeling of a series of relationships between design variables and the model bias, between model prediction and the model bias.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1118
Marcin Marek Okarmus, Rifat Keribar, Diana-Lucinia Dascalescu, Rob Zdrodowski
The helical spring is one of fundamental mechanical elements used in various industrial applications such as valves, suspension mechanisms, shock and vibration absorbers, hand levers, etc. In high speed applications, for instance in the internal combustion engine or in reciprocating compressor valves, helical springs are subjected to dynamic and impact loading, which can result in a phenomenon called “surge”. Hence, proper design and selection of helical springs should consider modeling the dynamic and impact response. In order to correctly characterize the physics of a helical spring and its response to dynamic excitations, a comprehensive model of spring elasticity for various spring coil and wire geometries, spring inertial effects as well as contacts between the windings leading to a non-linear spring force behavior is required. In practical applications, such models are utilized in parametric design and optimization studies.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1092
Anand Krishnasamy, Rolf D. Reitz, Werner Willems, Eric Kurtz
Diesel fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbons. Since modeling their combustion characteristics with the inclusion of all hydrocarbon species is not feasible, a hybrid surrogate model approach is used in the present work to represent the physical and chemical properties of three different diesel fuels by using up to 13 and 4 separate hydrocarbon species, respectively. The surrogates are arrived at by matching their distillation profiles and important properties with the real fuel, while the chemistry surrogates are arrived at by using a Group Chemistry Representation (GCR) method wherein the hydrocarbon species in the physical property surrogates are grouped based on their chemical classes, and the chemistry of each class is represented by using up to two hydrocarbon species.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0163
Robert Lietz, Burkhard Hupertz, Neil Lewington, Rafael Silveira, Christian Taucher
A benchmark study was conducted to assess the capability of an open source CFD based process to accurately simulate the physics of the flow field around various vehicle types. The ICON FOAMpro process was used to simulate the flow field of four baseline geometries of a Truck, CD-Car, B-Car and an SUV. Further studies were carried out to assess the effects of geometry variations on the predicted aerodynamic lift and drag. A Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) approach was chosen for the benchmarks. In addition to aerodynamic lift and drag values, the results for surface pressure data, surface and wake flow fields were calculated. These results were compared with values obtained using Ford's existing CFD processes.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0234
Gang Huang, Benda Yan, Z. Xia
The r-value is a very important parameter in the forming simulations of high strength steels, especially for steels with prominent anisotropy. R-values for sheet steels conventionally measured by extensometers were found neither consistent nor accurate due to difficulties in measuring the width strain. In this study, the Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique was applied to determine r-values in Longitudinal (L), Transverse (T) and Diagonal (D) directions for cold rolled DP980 GI, DP780 GI, DP600 GI and BH250 GI sheet steels. The r-values measured from DIC were validated by finite element analysis (FEA) of a uniaxial tensile test for BH250. The simulation results of the load-displacement for two plasticity models were compared to experimental data, with one being the isotropic yield (von-Mises) and the other being an anisotropic model (Hill-48) using the r-value measured from DIC.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0228
Zhimin Xi, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang
Analytical models (math or computer simulation models) are typically built on the basis of many assumptions and simplifications and hence model prediction could be inaccurate in intended applications. Model validation is thus critical to quantify and improve the degree of accuracy of these models. So far, little work considers model validation for various design configurations so that model prediction is accurate in the intended design space. Furthermore, there is a lack of effective approaches that can be used to quantify model accuracy considering different number of experimental data. To overcome these limitations, objective of this paper is to develop a model validation approach for various design configurations with a reference metric for model accuracy check considering different number of experimental data.
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2222
Subramanian Ramanathan, Anthony Hudson, Joshua Styron, Brian Baldwin, David Ives, Dan Ducu
A new diesel engine, called the 6.7L Power Stroke® V-8 Turbo Diesel and code named "Scorpion" was designed and developed by Ford Motor Company for the full-size pickup truck and light commercial vehicle markets. A high pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) layout in combination with a Variable Geometry Turbine (VGT) is used to deliver cooled EGR for in-cylinder NOx reduction. The cylinder-to-cylinder variation of EGR and swirl ratio is tightly controlled by the careful design of the EGR mixer and intake system flow path to reduce variability of cylinder-out PM and NOx emissions. 3D-CFD studies were used to quickly screen several EGR mixer designs based on mixing efficiency and pressure drop considerations. To optimize the intake system, 1D-3D co-simulation methodology with AVL-FIRE and AVL-BOOST has been used to assess the cylinder-to-cylinder EGR distribution and dynamic swirl.
1996-05-01
Technical Paper
961192
Zhiyu Han, Rolf D. Reitz, Peter J. Claybaker, Christopher J. Rutland, Jialin Yang, Richard W. Anderson
Multidimensional computations were carried out to simulate the in-cylinder fuel/air mixing process of a direct-injection spark-ignition engine using a modified version of the KIVA-3 code. A hollow cone spray was modeled using a Lagrangian stochastic approach with an empirical initial atomization treatment which is based on experimental data. Improved Spalding-type evaporation and drag models were used to calculate drop vaporization and drop dynamic drag. Spray/wall impingement hydrodynamics was accounted for by using a phenomenological model. Intake flows were computed using a simple approach in which a prescribed velocity profile is specified at the two intake valve openings. This allowed three intake flow patterns, namely, swirl, tumble and non-tumble, to be considered. It was shown that fuel vaporization was completed at the end of compression stroke with early injection timing under the chosen engine operating conditions.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0144
Houliang Li, Robin Soon, Xiaoming Bian, Joseph Lanzesira, Pamela Dawson, Richard Beason
There are benefits of using ultra thin wall (UTW) substrates (i.e., 900/2, 400/4, etc) in lowering cost and emission level. However, the more fragile mechanical characteristics of the UTW present a challenge to design and manufacture of robust catalytic converters. This paper describes a method of canning trial, where a combined Design of Experiment / Monte-Carlo analysis method was used, to develop and validate a canning method for ultra thin wall substrates. Canning trials were conducted in two stages-- Prototype Canning Trial and Production Canning Trial. In Prototype Canning Trial, the root cause of substrate failure was identified and a model for predicting substrate failure was established. Key factors affecting scrap rate and gap capability were identified and predictions were performed on scrap rate and gap capability with the allowed variations in the key factors. The results provided guidelines in designing production line and process control.
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650482
G. R. Beardsley
The purpose of this paper is to project the performance and economic objectives of over-the-road powerplants in the decade of the 1970’s. The influencing factors for this projection are trends in: intercity ton miles of freight, size and weight legislation, the interstate highway system maximum legal speed laws, and operating costs of interstate carriers. These factors set the stage and establish the horizon for over-the-road vehicles of tomorrow.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1544
Sunil Patil, Robert Lietz, Sudesh Woodiga, Hojun Ahn, Levon Larson, Ronald Gin, Michael Elmore, Alexander Simpson
Abstract One of the passive methods to reduce drag on the unshielded underbody of a passenger road vehicle is to use a vertical deflectors commonly called air dams or chin spoilers. These deflectors reduce the flow rate through the non-streamlined underbody and thus reduce the drag caused by underbody components protruding in to the high speed underbody flow. Air dams or chin spoilers have traditionally been manufactured from hard plastics which could break upon impact with a curb or any solid object on the road. To alleviate this failure mode vehicle manufacturers are resorting to using soft plastics which deflect and deform under aerodynamic loading or when hit against a solid object without breaking in most cases. This report is on predicting the deflection of soft chin spoiler under aerodynamic loads. The aerodynamic loads deflect the chin spoiler and the deflected chin spoiler changes the fluid pressure field resulting in a drag change.
1999-09-28
Technical Paper
1999-01-3157
Michael J. Saran, Feroz A. Jokhio, Mahmoud Y. Demeri
Robust processing window and subsequent quality of part are major concerns during sheet metal stamping. The sheet restraining force is a key parameter controlling metal flow, thus influencing formability and quality of the resulting part. Recent advances in press and die building provided capability of altering the restraining force (RF) during a stamping stroke via pulsating blankholder force (PBF). An outcome of this technology would be an increase in the maximum drawing depth resulting from a decrease in the average blankholder force. In this study, laboratory and numerical experiments were performed in an effort to better understand the effect of various PBF trajectories on stamping performance. A working numerical model using explicit code was successfully developed for time effective simulation of drawn cups with pulsating binder force. Preliminary results of this ongoing project are presented. The pulsating force trajectory was found to have a beneficial effect on drawability.
2001-04-30
Technical Paper
2001-01-1569
William Pielemeier, Jeffry Greenberg, Ray Meier, Vadivelu Jeyabalan, Norman C. Otto
Effects of DOF and subjective method on evaluations of ride quality on the Ford Vehicle Vibration Simulator were studied. Seat track vibrations from 6 vehicles were reproduced on the 6 DOF seat shaker in a DOE with pitch and roll as factors. These appeared in two evaluations of ride/shake; semantic scaling by 30 subjects of 6 vehicles, and paired comparisons by 16 of the subjects on 3 of the vehicles. Both methods found significant vehicle, pitch and roll effects. Order dependence was shown for semantic scaling. The less susceptible paired comparison method gave a different ordering, and is thus preferred.
2000-11-01
Technical Paper
2000-01-SC21
Peter J. Schuster, Clifford C. Chou
Lower limb injury is becoming an increasingly important concern in vehicle safety for both occupants and pedestrians. To enable vehicle manufacturers to better understand the biomechanical effects of design changes, it is deemed beneficial to employ a biomechanically fidelic finite element model of the human lower limb. The model developed in this study includes long bones (tibia, fibula, femur) and flat bone (patella) as deformable bodies. The pelvis and foot bones are modeled as rigid bodies connected to the femur and tibia/fibula via rotational spring-dashpots. The knee is defined by scanned bone surface geometry and is surrounded by the menisci, major ligaments, and patellar tendon. Finite elements used to model include 6- and 8-node solids for cartilage, menisci, surrounding muscles, and cancellous bone; 3- and 4-node shells for skin and cortical bone; and nonlinear spring-dashpots for ligaments.
1981-11-01
Technical Paper
811286
Eugene I. Farber
Analyses were performed to determine the sensitivity of stopping sight distance on vertical curves to driver eye height and other parameters entering into the stopping sight-distance equations. Sight distance was found to be relatively insensitive to eye height. On a given hill crest, sight distance for a driver whose eye height is 6-inches lower than the design eye height (3.75 ft) is only 5% less than the design sight distance. On the other hand, stopping distance is very sensitive to travel speed, pavement friction and reaction time. For example, a 1.8 mph decrease in speed reduces stopping distance by the same amount that a 6-inch decrease in eye height reduces sight distance. Also, sight distance is about 2.5 times more sensitive to obstacle height than eye height. It is argued that reductions in travel speed since the introduction of the 55-mph speed limit compensate for any recent or projected decreases in driver eye height.
1981-02-01
Technical Paper
810274
B. K. Powell, H. Wu, C. F. Aquino
A great deal of current automotive engineering effort involves the development of three-way catalyst-based emission control systems that seek to minimize fuel consumption while simultaneously meeting stringent exhaust emission standards. Mitigation of emissions is enhanced in a three-way catalyst system when the system air-fuel ratio (A/F) is in proximity to ideal burning or stoichiometry. This paper is concerned with extending methods used for determining engine calibrations to closed-loop systems with three-way catalysts. The paper presents a simulation model that employs experimentally obtained data to characterize the A/F control loop.
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