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Viewing 1 to 25 of 25
1981-10-01
Technical Paper
811198
J. A. Harrington, R. A. Yetter
A mini-dilution tube to measure particulate emissions is described and results obtained in an application are presented. The application selected is a study of fuel effects on stratified charge engine emission and combustion characteristics. The mini-dilution tube was developed to provide a capability for particulate measurements with dynamometer engines. The device has been demonstrated to yield particulate mass results agreeing to within 10 percent of those with a full scale tunnel in steady state tests with diesel powered vehicles. A PROCO engine modified by incorporation of Torch Ignition was used in the study. Fuels were a wide cut gasoline, methanol and Indolene Clear gasoline. The engine was operated at a speed of 1250 rpm with an indicated mean effective pressure of 390 kPa. Spark timing, injection timing, EGR and equivalence ratio were varied.
1983-02-01
Technical Paper
830335
Richard C. Belaire, George C. Davis, J. C. Kent, Rodney J. Tabaczynski
Experimental measurements of burn rates have been carried out in a single cylinder homogeneous charge engine. Three different combustion chambers were investigated (75 % and 60 % squish bowl-in-piston chambers and a disk chamber) using a cylinder head with a swirl producing intake port and near central spark location. Data were obtained with each combustion chamber as a function of spark timing, EGR, and load at 1500 RPM. The combustion rate is strongly influenced by chamber shape. The 10-90 % burn durations of the 75 % and 60 % squish chambers are respectively about 40 % and 60 % that of the disk chamber. Chamber configuration had less effect on 0-10 % burn duration. The disk had about 25 % longer 0-10 % burn time than the bowl-in-piston chambers. Modifications to the GESIM model enabled good overall agreement between predictions and experimental data, a rather severe test of the model because the coupling of fluid mechanics, combustion and chamber geometry must be properly modeled.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1644
Greg Uhlenhake, Ahmet Selamet, Kevin Fogarty, Kevin Tallio, Philip Keller
A cold turbocharger test facility was designed and developed at The Ohio State University to measure the performance characteristics under steady state operating conditions, investigate unsteady surge, and acquire acoustic data. A specific turbocharger is used for a thermodynamic analysis to determine the capabilities and limitations of the facility, as well as for the design and construction of the screw compressor, flow control, oil, and compression systems. Two different compression system geometries were incorporated. One system allows compressor performance measurements left of the surge line, while the other incorporates a variable-volume plenum. At the full plenum volume and a specific impeller tip speed, the temporal variation of the compressor inlet and outlet and the plenum pressures as well as the turbocharger speed is presented for stable, mild surge, and deep surge operating points.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1594
Jaclyn Johnson, Hai-Wen Ge, Jeffrey Naber, Seong-Young Lee, Eric Kurtz, Nan Robarge
Diesel combustion and emissions formation is spray and mixing controlled and understanding spray parameters is key to determining the impact of fuel injector operation and nozzle design on combustion and emissions. In this study, both spray visualization and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling were undertaken to investigate key mechanisms for liquid length fluctuations. For the experimental portion of this study a common rail piezoelectric injector was tested in an optically accessible constant volume combustion vessel. Liquid penetration of the spray was determined via processing of images acquired from Mie back scattering under vaporizing conditions by injecting into a charge gas at elevated temperature with a 0% oxygen environment. Tests were undertaken at a gas density of 34.8 kg/m₃, 2000 bar injection pressure, and at ambient temperatures of 900, 1100, and 1300 K.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0933
Jaclyn Johnson, Jeffrey Naber, Meng Tang, Zachary Taylor, Kyle Yeakle, Eric Kurtz, Nan Robarge
Abstract Diesel combustion and emissions is largely spray and mixing controlled. Spray and combustion models enable characterization over a range of conditions to understand optimum combustion strategies. The validity of models depends on the inputs, including the rate of injection profile of the injector. One method to measure the rate of injection is to measure the momentum, where the injected fuel spray is directed onto a force transducer which provides measurements of momentum flux. From this the mass flow rate is calculated. In this study, the impact of impingement distance, the distance from injector nozzle exit to the anvil connected to the force transducer, is characterized over a range of 2 - 12 mm. This characterization includes the impact of the distance on the momentum flux signal in both magnitude and shape. At longer impingement distances, it is hypothesized that a peak in momentum could occur due to increasing velocity of fuel injected as the pintle fully opens.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0533
Jianghui Mao, Carlos Engler-Pinto, Xuming Su
Abstract In this paper, thermal stress analysis for powertrain component is carried out using two in-house developed elasto-viscoplastic models (i.e. Chaboche model and Sehitoglu model) that are implemented into ABAQUS via its user subroutine UMAT. The model parameters are obtained from isothermal cyclic tests performed on standard samples under various combinations of strain rates and temperatures. Models' validity is verified by comparing to independent non-isothermal tests conducted on similar samples. Both models are applied to the numerical analysis of exhaust manifold subject to temperature cycling as a result of vehicle operation. Due to complexity, only four thermal cycles of heating-up and cooling-down are simulated. Results using the two material models are compared in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0831
Wonah Park, Youngchul Ra, Eric Kurtz, Werner Willems, Rolf D. Reitz
Abstract The low temperature combustion concept is very attractive for reducing NOx and soot emissions in diesel engines. However, it has potential limitations due to higher combustion noise, CO and HC emissions. A multiple injection strategy is an effective way to reduce unburned emissions and noise in LTC. In this paper, the effect of multiple injection strategies was investigated to reduce combustion noise and unburned emissions in LTC conditions. A hybrid surrogate fuel model was developed and validated, and was used to improve LTC predictions. Triple injection strategies were considered to find the role of each pulse and then optimized. The split ratio of the 1st and 2nd pulses fuel was found to determine the ignition delay. Increasing mass of the 1st pulse reduced unburned emissions and an increase of the 3rd pulse fuel amount reduced noise. It is concluded that the pulse distribution can be used as a control factor for emissions and noise.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1627
Anqi Zhang, Khanh Cung, Seong-Young Lee, Jeffrey Naber, Garlan Huberts, Michael Czekala, Qiuping Qu
An operational scheme with fuel-lean and exhaust gas dilution in spark-ignited engines increases thermal efficiency and decreases NOx emission, while these operations inherently induce combustion instability and thus large cycle-to-cycle variation in engine. In order to stabilize combustion variations, the development of an advanced ignition system is becoming critical. To quantify the impact of spark-ignition discharge, ignitability tests were conducted in an optically accessible combustion vessel to characterize the flame kernel development of lean methane-air mixture with CO₂ simulating exhaust diluent. A shrouded fan was used to generate turbulence in the vicinity of J-gap spark plug and a Variable Output Ignition System (VOIS) capable of producing a varied set of spark discharge patterns was developed and used as an ignition source.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1630
Wei Chen, Daniel Madison, Paul Dice, Jeffrey Naber, Bo Chen, Scott Miers, Michael Czekala, Chris Glugla, Qiuping Qu, Garlan Huberts
For spark-ignition gasoline engines operating under the wide speed and load conditions required for light duty vehicles, ignition quality limits the ability to minimize fuel consumption and NOx emissions via dilution under light and part load conditions. In addition, during transients including tip-outs, high levels of dilution can occur for multiple combustion events before either the external exhaust gas can be adjusted and cleared from the intake or cam phasing can be adjusted for correct internal dilution. Further improvement and a thorough understanding of the impact of the ignition system on combustion near the dilution limit will enable reduced fuel consumption and robust transient operation. To determine and isolate the effects of multiple parameters, a variable output ignition system (VOIS) was developed and tested on a 3.5L turbocharged V6 homogeneous charge direct-injection gasoline engine with two spark plug gaps and three ignition settings.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1659
Arsham J. Shahlari, Chris Hocking, Eric Kurtz, Jaal Ghandhi
Many combustion researchers use peak pressure rise rate or ringing intensity to indicate combustion noise in lieu of microphone data or using a combustion noise meter that simulates the attenuation characteristics of the engine structure. In this paper, peak pressure rise rate and ringing intensity are compared to combustion noise using a fully documented algorithm similar to the ones used by combustion noise meters. Data from multiple engines operating under several low-temperature combustion strategies were analyzed. The results suggest that neither peak pressure rise rate nor ringing intensity provides a direct correlation to engine noise over a wide range of operating conditions. Moreover, the estimation of both metrics is often accompanied by the filtering of the pressure data, which changes the absolute value of the results.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1092
Anand Krishnasamy, Rolf D. Reitz, Werner Willems, Eric Kurtz
Diesel fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbons. Since modeling their combustion characteristics with the inclusion of all hydrocarbon species is not feasible, a hybrid surrogate model approach is used in the present work to represent the physical and chemical properties of three different diesel fuels by using up to 13 and 4 separate hydrocarbon species, respectively. The surrogates are arrived at by matching their distillation profiles and important properties with the real fuel, while the chemistry surrogates are arrived at by using a Group Chemistry Representation (GCR) method wherein the hydrocarbon species in the physical property surrogates are grouped based on their chemical classes, and the chemistry of each class is represented by using up to two hydrocarbon species.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0904
Xiaoye Han, Jimi Tjong, Meiping Wang, Graham Reader, Ming Zheng
As a renewable energy source, the ethanol fuel was employed with a diesel fuel in this study to improve the cylinder charge homogeneity for high load operations, targeting on ultra-low nitrogen oxides (NOx) and smoke emissions. A light-duty diesel engine is configured to adapt intake port fuelling of the ethanol fuel while keeping all other original engine components intact. High load experiments are performed to investigate the combustion control and low emission enabling without sacrificing the high compression ratio (18.2:1). The intake boost, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and injection pressure are independently controlled, and thus their effects on combustion and emission characteristics of the high load operation are investigated individually. The low temperature combustion is accomplished at high engine load (16~17 bar IMEP) with regulation compatible NOx and soot emissions.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0697
David J. MacMillan, Theo Law, Paul J. Shayler, Ian Pegg
The effect of compression ratio on sensitivity to changes in start of injection and air-fuel ratio has been investigated on a single-cylinder DI diesel engine at fixed low and medium speeds and loads. Compression ratio was set to 17.9:1 or 13.7:1 by using pistons with different bowl sizes. Injection timing and air-to-fuel ratio were swept around a nominal map point at which gross IMEP and NOx values were matched for the two compression ratios. It was found that CO, HC and ISFC were higher at low compression ratio, but the soot/NOx trade-off improved and this could be exploited to reduce the fuel economy penalty. Sensitivity to inputs is generally similar, but high compression ratio tended to have steeper response gradients. Reducing compression ratio to 13.7 gave rise to a marked degradation of performance at light load, producing high CO emissions and a fall in combustion efficiency. This could be eased by reducing rail pressure, but the advantage in smoke emission was lost.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-1071
Michael McGhee, Paul J. Shayler, Antonino LaRocca, Michael Murphy, Ian Pegg
Experimental studies have been undertaken on a single-cylinder HPCR diesel engine with a compression ratio of 15.5:1 to explore the effect of fuel injection strategy on cycle by cycle stability. The influence of the number, separation and quantity of pilot injections on the coefficient of variation of IMEP has been investigated at -20°C, 1000 rev/min, post-start idling conditions. Injection strategy and glow plug temperature trade-off has also been investigated at a range of soak temperatures. Up to four pilot injections have been used. For timing of the main injection near to the optimum, CoVIMEP values of 10% or better can be achieved. Closer spacing of injections improved stability and extended the range of timings to meet target stability. The best combinations of pilot number and pilot quantity varied with total fuel delivered.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0148
Wan Mohd Faizal Wan Mahmood, Antonino LaRocca, Paul J. Shayler, Fabrizio Bonatesta, Ian Pegg
Soot formation and distribution inside the cylinder of a light-duty direct injection diesel engine, have been predicted using Kiva-3v CFD software. Pathlines of soot particles traced from specific in-cylinder locations and crank angle instants have been explored using the results for cylinder charge motion predicted by the Kiva-3v code. Pathlines are determined assuming soot particles are massless and follow charge motion. Coagulation and agglomeration have not been taken into account. High rates of soot formation dominate during and just after the injection. Oxidation becomes dominant after the injection has terminated and throughout the power stroke. Computed soot pathlines show that soot particles formed just below the fuel spray axis during the early injection period are more likely to travel to the cylinder wall boundary layer. Soot particles above the fuel spray have lesser tendency to be conveyed to the cylinder wall.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-1216
Jean-Paul Zammit, Paul J. Shayler, Richard Gardiner, Ian Pegg
Reducing friction in crankshaft bearings during cold engine operation by heating the oil supply to the main gallery has been investigated through experimental investigations and computational modelling. The experimental work was undertaken on a 2.4l DI diesel engine set up with an external heat source to supply hot oil to the gallery. The aim was to raise the film temperature in the main bearings early in the warm up, producing a reduction in oil viscosity and through this, a reduction in friction losses. The effectiveness of this approach depends on the management of heat losses from the oil. Heat transfer along the oil pathway to the bearings, and within the bearings to the journals and shells, reduces the benefit of the upstream heating.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-1212
David C. Luff, Theo Law, Paul J. Shayler, Ian Pegg
A Ford 2.4-liter 115PS light-duty diesel engine was modified to allow solenoid control of the oil feed to the piston cooling jets, enabling these to be switched on or off on demand. The influence of the jets on piston temperatures, engine thermal state, gaseous emissions and fuel economy has been investigated. With the jets switched off, piston temperatures were measured to be between 23 and 88°C higher. Across a range of speed-load points, switching off the jets increased engine-out emissions of NOx typically by 3%, and reduced emissions of CO by 5-10%. Changes in HC were of the same order and were reductions at most conditions. Fuel consumption increased at low-speed, high-load conditions and decreased at high-speed, low-load conditions. Applying the results to the NEDC drive cycle suggests active on/off control of the jets could reduce engine-out emissions of CO by 6%, at the expense of a 1% increase in NOx, compared to the case when the jets are on continuously.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-1328
Theo Law, David MacMillan, Paul J. Shayler, Geoff Kirk, Ian Pegg, Roland Stark
The largest contribution to engine rubbing friction is made by the piston and piston rings running in the cylinder liner. The magnitude and characteristics of the friction behaviour and the influence on these of factors such as surface roughness, piston design and lubricant properties are of keen interest. Investigating presents experimental challenges, including potential problems of uncontrolled build-to-build variability when component changes are made. These are addressed in the design of a new motored piston and floating liner rig. The design constrains transverse movement of a single liner using cantilevered mounts at the top and bottom. The mounts and two high stiffness strain gauged load cells constrain vertical movement. The outputs of the load cells are processed to extract the force contribution associated with friction. The liner, piston and crankshaft parts were taken from a EuroV-compliant, HPCR diesel engine with a swept capacity of 550cc per cylinder.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0371
Gang Guo, Douglas Dobson, James Warner, William Ruona, Christine Lambert
U.S. federal vehicle emission standards effective in 2007 require tight control of NOx and hydrocarbon emissions. For light-duty vehicles, the current standard of Tier 2 Bin 5 is about 0.07 g/mi NOx and 0.09 g/mi NMOG (non-methane organic gases) at 120,000 mi. However, the proposed future standard is 0.03 g/mi for NMOG + NOx (~SULEV30) at 150,000 mi. There is a significant improvement needed in catalyst system efficiencies for diesel vehicles to achieve the future standard, mainly during cold start. In this study, a less than 6000 lbs diesel truck equipped with an advanced urea Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system was used to pursue lower tailpipe emissions with an emphasis on vehicle calibration and catalyst package. The calibration was tuned by optimizing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) fuel injection and cold start strategy to generate desirable engine-out emissions balanced with reasonable temperatures.
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2222
Subramanian Ramanathan, Anthony Hudson, Joshua Styron, Brian Baldwin, David Ives, Dan Ducu
A new diesel engine, called the 6.7L Power Stroke® V-8 Turbo Diesel and code named "Scorpion" was designed and developed by Ford Motor Company for the full-size pickup truck and light commercial vehicle markets. A high pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) layout in combination with a Variable Geometry Turbine (VGT) is used to deliver cooled EGR for in-cylinder NOx reduction. The cylinder-to-cylinder variation of EGR and swirl ratio is tightly controlled by the careful design of the EGR mixer and intake system flow path to reduce variability of cylinder-out PM and NOx emissions. 3D-CFD studies were used to quickly screen several EGR mixer designs based on mixing efficiency and pressure drop considerations. To optimize the intake system, 1D-3D co-simulation methodology with AVL-FIRE and AVL-BOOST has been used to assess the cylinder-to-cylinder EGR distribution and dynamic swirl.
1996-10-01
Technical Paper
962012
Charles E Richardson, Jennifer L Fischer, Gregory Pawczuk
Since 1992 some vehicles have experienced engine knock or rapping noise during cold starts that is caused by combustion chamber deposit interference (CCDI) To better understand the CCDI phenomena, engine dynamometer studies were conducted. Results show that base gasoline composition and detergent additive compositions have significant effects on combustion chamber deposit (CCD) build-up In addition to engine testing, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine a correlation between unwashed gum and CCD levels
1996-08-01
Technical Paper
961712
Djong-Gie Oei
A fuel cell (FC) powerplant is an electrochemical engine that converts fuel and an oxidant electrochemically into electric energy, water and other chemical byproducts. When hydrogen is used as the fuel, the only products of the electrochemical reactions are water and electric power. Other conventional and advanced powerplants for transportation, such as the internal combustion (IC) engine, the Diesel engine and others, are thermal combustion engines. The theoretical or thermodynamic efficiency of a fuel cell or electrochemical engine is much higher than the thermodynamic efficiency of a heat engine. The practical efficiency of a fuel cell is highest at partial load, whereas the practical efficiency of a heat engine is highest at maximum power. A survey is presented of the different fuel cell types and their characteristics. The proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell is shown to be the best available fuel cell for transportation applications.
1965-02-01
Technical Paper
650497
N. W. Faustyn, J. Eastman
Continuing demands for performance improvements in passenger car engines led to the development of the Ford 427 cu in. single overhead cam engine. See Fig. 1. Author discusses manner in which development of this engine was accomplished, using several design parameters, which included new and previously proved features.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0918
Liangjun Hu, Harold Sun, Jianwen Yi, Eric W. Curtis, Anthony Morelli, Jizhong Zhang, Ben Zhao, Ce Yang, Xin Shi, Shangtao Liu
Variable nozzle turbine (VNT) technology has become a popular technology for diesel engine application. To pivot the nozzle vane and adjust the turbine operating condition, nozzle clearances are inevitable on both the hub and shroud side of turbine housing. Leakage flow formed inside the nozzle clearance leads to extra flow loss and makes the nozzle exit flow less uniform, thus further affects downstream aerodynamic performance of the rotor. As the leakage mixing with nozzle wake flow, the process is highly unsteady, which increases the fluctuation amplitude of transient load on the rotating turbine wheels. In present paper, firstly steady CFD analysis of a turbocharger turbine was performed at different nozzle openings. Then unsteady simulation of the turbine was carried out to investigate the interaction between the leakage flow through nozzle clearance and the main flow. Nozzle clearance's effect on turbine performance was investigated.
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