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Viewing 1 to 30 of 110
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1540
Darrell Robinette, Michael Grimmer, Randall Beikmann
The objective of this investigation is to characterize the torsional characteristics of the hydrodynamic torque converter. Analytical and experimental techniques are used to quantify the relationship between torsional oscillations imposed on the pump to those at the turbine as a function of frequency, operating point and design. A detailed model of the hydrodynamic torque converter based upon one-dimensional flow theory is used to establish fundamental torsional behavior independent of the downstream mechanical system. A simplified linear spring-mass-damper representation of the hydrodynamic torque converter is derived whose coefficients are proportional to pump speed for a particular design. A transmission dynamometer test cell with the capability to produce torsional oscillations was used to develop frequency response functions for various torque converters in a transmission, operating at steady state conditions.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1428
Mark A. Schang, Matthew Whitton, David Webert, Todd Berger
In an effort to increase fuel economy and improve shift quality - the GF6 family of General Motors transmissions has been analyzed for potential enhancements. The focus of this analysis was to improve fuel economy, while increasing downshift responsiveness, and manual mode sport delays. This paper describes a variety of the hardware philosophy changes, and control methods which have contributed to the next generation of GM clutch-to-clutch 6-speed transmissions. These changes to hardware and controls have led to a composite fuel economy improvement of 4.5% with no changes to shift or torque-converter scheduling. In addition, the downshift responsiveness has been significantly improved to reduce delay times by approximately 50% while virtually eliminating the dependency on engine torque reductions - ultimately allowing for stacked downshifts to progress with minimal, if any, time between shifts. Additionally, “tap shift” delays have been significantly decreased to levels near 150 ms.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1407
Fanghui Shi
Presented in the paper is a comprehensive analysis for floating piston pin. It is more challenging because it is a special type of journal bearing where the rotation of the journal is coupled with the friction between the journal and the bearing. In this analysis, the multi-degree freedom mass-conserving mixed-EHD equations are solved to determine the coupled pin rotation and friction. Other bearing characteristics, such as minimum film thickness, pin secondary motions in both connecting-rod small-end bearing and piston pin-boss bearing, power loss etc are also determined. The mechanism for floating pin to have better scuffing resistance is discovered. The theoretical and numerical model is implemented in the GM internal software FLARE (Friction and Lubrication Analysis for Reciprocating Engines).
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1409
José Carlos Zavala, Charles Folkerts
Engine knock has been studied extensively over the years. Its undesired effects on drivability, its potential to damage an engine, and its impact on limiting the compression ratio are the main reasons why it remains a current topic of research. This paper focuses on exploiting the connection between auto-ignition and knock. A new method based on the frequency analysis of the heat release traces is proposed to detect and estimate auto-ignition/knock robustly. Filtering the heat release signal with the appropriate bandwidth is crucial to avoid misdetection. The filter settings used in this paper are found using spectral analysis of the heat release signal. By using the proposed method, it is possible to detect auto-ignition/knock even under the presence of undesired sensor resonance effects and noise from mechanical and electrical sources.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1663
Darrell Robinette, Michael Grimmer, Randall Beikmann
This paper presents a test methodology to determine the physical properties of stiffness and damping for powertrain rotating components using a free-free torsional frequency response measurement. The test methodology utilizes free-free boundary conditions and traditional modal test techniques applied to symmetric rotating components with substantially large bounding masses of known inertia. A modal test on the rotating component is executed by mounting accelerometers on opposing tangential bosses in the same direction on each of the inertial masses and impacting one of the bosses with a modal hammer to acquire frequency response functions (FRF's). Physical properties are then extracted from the FRF's using fundamental vibration relationships for an assumed two degree of freedom system. Stiffness and damping values for a variety of hollow tube carbon fiber drive shafts and a comparable steel-aluminum shaft are reported using the methodology presented.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0887
Michael A. Miller, Alan G. Holmes, Brendan M. Conlon, Peter J. Savagian
The Chevrolet Volt is an electric vehicle (EV) that operates exclusively on battery power as long as useful energy is available in the battery pack under normal conditions. After the battery is depleted of available energy, extended-range (ER) driving uses fuel energy in an internal combustion engine (ICE), an on-board generator, and a large electric driving motor. This extended-range electric vehicle (EREV) utilizes electric energy in an automobile more effectively than a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), which characteristically blends electric and engine power together during driving. A specialized EREV powertrain, called the "Voltec," drives the Volt through its entire range of speed and acceleration with battery power alone, within the limit of battery energy, thereby displacing more fuel with electricity, emitting less CO₂, and producing less cold-start emissions than a PHEV operating in real-world conditions.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0908
Elana Chapman, Jill Cummings
Corrosion inhibitors (CIs) have been used for years to protect the supply and distribution hardware used for transportation of fuel from refineries. The impact of these inhibitors on spark ignited fuel systems, specifically intake valve deposits, is known and presented in open literature. However, the relationship of the additive concentrations to the powertrain intake valve deposit performance is not understood. This paper has two purposes: to present and discuss a market place survey of corrosion inhibitors and how they vary in concentration in the final blended fuel; and, to show how the variation in the concentrations of the CIs impact the operation and performance of vehicles, specifically, the effects on intake valve deposit formation. Commercially available corrosion inhibitor packages for both gasoline and ethanol blended fuels, specifically E85 fuels, were studied for their chemical compositions, and their impact on valves for a port fuel injection (PFI) engine.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0723
John Schultz
General Motor's new front wheel drive six speed 6T40 automatic transmission benefits from patented technology to control high speed pump cavitation that is innovative yet cost effective. An annular nozzle is created with careful pump inlet design by integrating a conical section in the filter neck to create a jet pump to prevent high speed cavitation for almost no additional cost. Excess oil from a fixed displacement pump is used to achieve an effective increase in pressure at the inlet of the rotating group during high speed operation. Control of high speed cavitation reduces pump noise and improves line pressure control stability.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0718
Hai Xu, Avinash Singh, Don Maddock, Ahmet Kahraman, Joshua Hurley
In recent years, there has been a sustained effort by the automotive OEMs and suppliers to improve the vehicle driveline efficiency. This has been in response to customer demands for greater vehicle fuel economy and increasingly stringent government regulations. The automotive rear axle is one of the major sources of power loss in the driveline, and hence represents an area where power loss improvements can have a significant impact on overall vehicle fuel economy. Both the friction induced mechanical losses and the spin losses vary significantly with the operating temperature of the lubricant. Also, the preloads in the bearings can vary due to temperature fluctuations. The temperatures of the lubricant, the gear tooth contacting surfaces, and the bearing contact surfaces are critical to the overall axle performance in terms of power losses, fatigue life, and wear.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0699
Darrell Robinette, Michael Powell
A cost effective means of achieving fuel economy gains in conventional powertrain is to utilize a 12 volt start/stop (S/S) system to turn the engine off and on during periods of vehicle idle. This paper presents powertrain integration issues specific to a 12 volt S/S system and the powertrain hardware content and calibration strategies required to execute a 12 volt S/S system for start ability, reduced noise and vibration (N&V) and vehicle launch. A correlated lumped parameter modeling methodology is used to determine engine startup profiles, starter hardware and intake cam park position requirements based upon vehicle level response to the startup event. Optimization of the engine startup is reported for a multitude of powertrain configurations, including transverse and longitudinal arrangements with manual, automatic and dual clutch transmissions.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0695
Hossein Javaherian, Alan W. Brown, Michael P. Nolan
A frequency-domain approach to balancing of air-fuel ratio (A/F) in a multi-cylinder engine is described. The technique utilizes information from a single Wide-Range Air-Fuel ratio (WRAF) or a single switching (production) O₂ sensor installed in the exhaust manifold of an internal combustion engine to eliminate the imbalances. At the core of the proposed approach is the development of a simple novel method for the characterization of A/F imbalances among the cylinders. The proposed approach provides a direct objective metric for the characterization of the degree of A/F imbalances for diagnostic purposes as well as a methodology for the control of A/F imbalances among various cylinders. The fundamental computational requirement is based on the calculation of a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) of the A/F signal as measured by a WRAF or a switching O₂ sensor.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0792
Fan Li, Stephen Sibal, Peiran Ding
For a system which involves a fluid medium contained inside a deformable structure, such as a liquid fuel system, a simulation which couples the structure and fluid may be required depending on the operating conditions and system performance metric of interest. Simulation methods for fluid / structure interaction (FSI) have been gradually developed by CAE engineers with the advent of increased computer power. A robust fuel system design requires carefully designed components that can withstand all loadings it may experience. This paper presents both LS-Dyna's Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) and Abaqus' Coupled Eulerian-Lagrange (CEL) methods for predicting the structural performance of a fuel tank system and demonstrates that a fuel tank systems and their components can be numerically evaluated before the products release.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0756
Mark Steffka
The engineering of electric propulsion systems requires time and cost efficient methodologies to determine system characteristics as well as potential component integration issues. A significant part of this analysis is the identification of the electromagnetic fields present in the propulsion system. Understanding of the electromagnetic fields during system operation is a significant design consideration due to the use of components that require large current(s) and high voltage(s) in the proximity of other control system items (such as sensors) that operate with low current(s) and voltage(s). Therefore, it is critical to quantify the electromagnetic fields produced by these components within the design and how they may interact with other system components. Often overlooked (and also extremely important) is an evaluation of how the overall system architecture can generate or react to electromagnetic fields (which may be a direct result of packaging approaches).
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0870
Anthony Smith, Norman Bucknor, Hong Yang, Yongsheng He
In a parallel hybrid electric vehicle, higher fuel economy gains are typically achieved if significant electric drive (or engine-off) operation is possible, shifting the engine operating schedule so that it only runs at medium to high load for best efficiency. To enable efficient engine-off driving, a typical configuration will have a disconnect clutch between the engine and the rest of the driveline. In some configurations, when engine-on operation is requested the disconnect clutch is applied in conjunction with the traction motor/generator to crank the engine (i.e., a flying engine start). In this paper we describe the development of a control system for a flying engine start using an engine disconnect clutch. The clutch is located between the engine and electric motor, which is connected to the input of a multispeed transmission. We first describe an initial control algorithm evaluation using a driveline model.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0883
Hong Yang, Anthony Smith, Shawn Swales, Joel Maguire
The two-mode hybrid system has several advantages over a one-mode EVT system: greater ability to transmit power mechanically and minimize electrical recirculation power, maximize fuel economy improvement and best meet demanding vehicle requirements. Extending the two-mode hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) to two-mode plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) is significant not only to make the internal combustion engine (ICE)-based vehicle cleaner and more efficient in the near term, but also to provide a potential path to battery electric vehicles in the future. For PHEV, the enhanced electric drive capability is of vital importance to achieve best efficiency and best electric only performance. This paper describes the development of a prototype two-mode hybrid powertrain with enhanced EV capability (2MH4EV). The prototype drive unit includes an additional input brake to the existing General Motors FWD 2-mode HEV system.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0421
V. A. Muruganandam, Maruthi Dhulipudi, Uday Korde
Coolant pipes are a prime connection units present in any engines that facilitates the flow of coolant and thereby keeping the engine under its optimum operating condition. Among the several influencing factors that deteriorate engines performance, the coolant leak is also one of the contributors. This could be caused primly due to leakage issues that arises from the pipe press fit zones. Henceforth it is very important to understand the root cause of this press-fit connection failure. The present study deals with press-fit between the pipe and housing in an engine which is subjected to extreme thermal loads (min of -40°C to a max temperature of +150°C) thereby causing the press-fit loosening effect.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0375
Fanghui Shi, Dingfeng Deng
A comprehensive analysis has been performed for floating bearings applied in a turbocharger. It is found that Couette power loss for a full-floating bearing (the floating ring rotates) decreases with increasing inner and outer clearances, while its Poiseuille power loss increases with increasing inner and outer film clearances. In comparison with a semi-floating bearing (the floating ring does not rotate), a full-floating bearing can reduce both Couette and Poiseuille power losses. However, floating bearing is found to have a smaller minimum film thickness for a given dynamic loading from rotor-dynamics. The total power loss reduction for typical full-floating bearings ranges from 13% to 27%, which matches well with some published experimental data. In general, the speed ratio increases with increasing outer film clearance, while it decreases with increasing inner film clearance because of shear stresses on the outer and inner film.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0396
Kumaraswamy Hebbale, Chunhao Lee, Farzad Samie, Chi-Kuan Kao, Xu Chen, Jeremy Horgan, Scott Hearld
To realize better fuel economy benefits from transmissions, car makers have started the application of torque converter clutch control in second gear and beyond, resulting in greater demand on the torque converter clutch (TCC) and its control system. This paper focuses on one aspect of the control of the torque converter clutch to improve fuel economy and faster response of the transmission. A TCC is implemented to control the slip between the pump and turbine of the torque converter, thereby increasing its energy transfer efficiency and increasing vehicle fuel economy. However, due to the non-linear nature of the torque converter fluid coupling, the slip feedback control has to be very active to handle different driver inputs and road-load conditions, such as different desired slip levels, changes in engine input torques, etc. This non-linearity requires intense calibration efforts to precisely control the clutch slip in all the scenarios.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0392
Dongxu Li, Kumaraswamy Hebbale, Chunhao Lee, Farzad Samie, Chi-Kuan Kao
Automobile drivers/passengers perceive automatic transmission (AT) shift quality through the torque transferred by transmission output shaft, so that torque regulation is critical in transmission shift control and etc. However, since a physical torque sensor is expensive, current shift control in AT is usually achieved by tracking a turbine speed profile due to the lack of the transmission output torque information. A direct torque feedback has long been desired for transmission shift control enhancement. This paper addresses a “virtual” torque sensor (VTS) algorithm that can provide an accurate estimate on the torque variation in the vehicle transmission output shaft using (existing) speed sensors. We have developed the algorithm using both the transmission output speed sensor and anti-lock braking system speed sensors. Practical solutions are provided to enhance the accuracy of the algorithm. The algorithm has been successfully implemented on both FWD and RWD vehicles.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0393
John Marano, Steven Moorman, John Czoykowski, Chinar Ghike
The achievable shift quality of a modern automatic transmission may be greatly affected by the equivalent rotational inertia of the gearbox and driveline components. New, more mass- and packaging-efficient higher number of gear powerflows are being developed. These new architectures often result in more components being attached to a given rotational node. The rotational speed multiplication of the components must be considered when determining their inertial torque contribution to a given speed change event. An example of this multiplication effect is presented, with a discussion of the resulting impact to shift quality disturbance. Opportunities to address the negative aspects of the higher inertial torque contribution to transmission output shaft disturbance are discussed. Coordination of engine torque control and clutch torque control is presented as a viable strategy to improve shift quality.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0394
Zhe Xie
A system level analysis was carried out on the effect of flow forces on a flow control variable force solenoid (VFS) used in automatic transmissions. Classic flow force model was reviewed as a function of the pressure difference and the solenoid current. A force balance analysis was conducted on the spool valve in the VFS, in order to study the relationship among the control current, flow forces, spring forces, and flow area. Flow bench testing was used to characterize a specific flow control VFS by both the pressure drop and solenoid current, in forward and reverse flow directions. The behavior of flow control VFS valve is significantly affected by flow forces. A sub-system level model was thus created to predict the steady-state and dynamic behavior of the flow VFS valve, which can be used in a transmission system level analysis. The modeling results were compared against experimental data to show the validity of the methodology.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0666
Sowmyalatha Jayaraman, Gordon Anderson, Shailendra Kaushik, Philip Klaus
Fuel economy and stringent emissions requirements have steered the automotive industry to invest in advanced propulsion hybrids, including Plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEV) and Fuel cell vehicles. The choice of battery technology, its power and thermal management and the overall vehicle energy optimization during different conditions are crucial design considerations for PHEVs and battery electric vehicles (BEV). Current industry focus is on Li-Ion batteries due to their high energy density. However, extreme operating temperatures may impact battery life and performance. Different cooling strategies have been proposed for efficient thermal management of battery systems. This paper discusses the modeling and analysis strategy for a thermally managed Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) battery pack, with coolant as the conditioning medium.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0667
Ramesh Rebba, Jeong Hun Seo, Ann Marie Sastry, Mary Fortier
Rechargeable energy storage systems with Lithium-ion pouch cells are subject to various ambient temperature conditions and go through thousands of charge-discharge cycles during the life time of operation. The cells may change their thickness with internal heat generation, cycling and any other mechanisms. The stacked prismatic cells thus experience face pressure and this could impact the pack electrical performance. The pack consists of stiff end plates keeping the pack in tact using bolts, cooling fins to maintain cell temperature and foam padding in between cells. The pack level thermal requirements limit the amount of temperature increase during normal operating conditions. Similarly, the structural requirements state that the stresses and the deflection in the end plates should be minimal. Uncertainties in cell, foam mechanical and thermal properties might add variation to the pack performance.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0632
Andrea De Filippo
This paper focuses on measuring particle emissions of a representative light-duty diesel vehicle equipped with different engine exhaust aftertreatment in close-coupled position, including one designed to meet the upcoming Euro 6 emission standards. The latter combines a lean NOx trap (LNT) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) in series to simultaneously reduce NOx and PM. Particle Matter (PM) and particle number emissions are measured throughout testing procedure and instrumentation which are compliant with the UN-ECE Regulation 83 proposals. Specifically measuring devices for particle number emissions, provided by two different suppliers, are alternatively used. No significant differences are observed due to the different system employed. On the other hand particle size distributions are measured by means of a specific experimental set-up including a two stage dilution system and an electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI).
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0633
Andrea De Filippo, Claudio Ciaravino, Federico Millo, Davide Vezza, Debora Fino, Nunzio Russo, Theodoros Vlachos
Experimental work was carried out on a small displacement Euro 5 automotive diesel engine alternatively fuelled with ultra low sulphur diesel (ULSD) and with two blends (30% vol.) of ULSD and of two different fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) obtained from both rapeseed methyl ester (RME) and jatropha methyl ester (JME) in order to evaluate the effects of different fuel compositions on particle number (PN) emissions. Particulate matter (PM) emissions for each fuel were characterized in terms of number and mass size distributions by means of two stage dilutions system coupled with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Measurements were performed at three different sampling points along the exhaust system: at engine-out, downstream of the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and downstream of the diesel particulate filter (DPF). Thus, it was possible to evaluate both the effects of combustion and after-treatment efficiencies on each of the tested fuels.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0867
James Gibbs, Thais Tabor
The On Board Jump Start feature utilized on GM's Belt Alternator Starter (BAS) hybrids takes advantage of the High Voltage (HV) battery and other HV propulsion systems to supplement a low 12V battery during starting events. This feature has the potential to eliminate the need for an off vehicle 12V power source, such as a 2nd vehicle, to start the vehicle when the 12V battery is low.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0861
V.Prasad Atluri, Kerem Koprubasi, Rajiv Gupta, Norman D. Brinkman
Today, nearly half of the world population lives in urban areas. As the world population continues to migrate to urban areas for increased economic opportunities, addressing personal mobility challenges such as air pollution, Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) and traffic congestion in these regions will become even a greater challenge especially in rapidly growing nations. Road transportation is a major source of air pollution in urban areas causing numerous health concerns. Improvements in automobile technology over the past several decades have resulted in reducing conventional vehicle tailpipe emissions to exceptionally low levels. This transformation has been attained mainly through advancements in engine and transmission technologies and through partial electrification of vehicles. However, the technological advancements made so far alone will not be able to mitigate the issues due to increasing GHGs and air pollution in urban areas.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0840
Ronald O. Grover, Jr.
A CFD code is enhanced with a fuel tracer diagnostic to track the liquid and vapor fuel mass separately from individual spray plumes of a multi-hole injector and the wall film. The approach works by solving a set of additional scalar transport equations for fuel vapor generated from individual nozzle hole and the wall film. The diagnostic tool is first validated against experiments from a 4-valve, wall-guided spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engine. A CFD analysis is carried out to understand the experimentally observed trade-offs in combustion stability and smoke emissions between a 70degree hollow-cone swirl injector and a 40 degree, 5-hole, circular-type multi-hole injector at a lean, stratified idle operating condition. Engine tests show that the multi-hole injector results in lower COV of IMEP than the hollow-cone swirl injector at the expense of significantly higher smoke emissions.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0924
Mark A. Gehringer, Eric J. Defenderfer
This paper describes the development of an improved method for Noise and Vibration (N&V) chassis dynamometer testing using Road Load Simulation (RLS). Powertrain-induced noise and vibration testing on a chassis dynamometer has commonly been conducted using fixed loads or simplistic load versus speed approximations. Simple speed control and load control dyno test conditions are largely sufficient to provide representative noise and vibration performance assessment when the powertrain and its controls are insensitive to differences between the actual road load and the dyno load. With the recent growth of advanced engine control systems and hybrid powertrains, more representative road load simulation is required to ensure proper operation of the increasingly sophisticated and diverse powertrain and chassis control systems. Proper exercise of these control systems often determines the quality of the noise and vibration data.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0934
Pierpaolo Antonioli, Romualdo Ruotolo, Marcello Rimondi, Daniele Lomario
In the automotive industry, CAE methods are now widely used to predict several functional characteristics and to develop designs that are first-time-capable to meet programs targets. The N&V area is one of the increasing key factors for a product differentiation; costumers expect not only more powerful and more fuel efficient but also less noisy engines. The oil pan is one of the bigger contributors to engine radiated noise and to diesel knocking, so that great attention is paid within GM to optimize oil pans of Diesel engines by following a CAE-based approach to achieve a “first-time-capable” design for this component. This allows focusing the subsequent N&V testing activities to pinpoint modifications mainly on those components with shorter lead time. This paper describes the key-steps that are executed to optimize the oil pan design by using CAE methods with the main intent of reducing its noise radiation.
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