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Viewing 1 to 30 of 59
2009-07-12
Technical Paper
2009-01-2533
H. Y.(Jannivine) Yeh, Cheryl B. Brown, Molly S. Anderson, Michael K. Ewert, Frank F. Jeng
The development of the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Sizing Analysis Tool (ALSSAT) using Microsoft® Excel was initiated by the Crew and Thermal Systems Division of the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in 1997 to support the ALS and Exploration Offices in Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) design and studies. It aids the user in performing detailed sizing of the ECLSS for different combinations of Exploration Life Support (ELS) regenerative system technologies. This analysis tool will assist the user in performing ECLSS preliminary design and trade studies as well as system optimization efficiently and economically.
2009-07-12
Technical Paper
2009-01-2542
Brian M. Sutin, William Niu, George Steiner, William O'Hara, John F. Lewis
The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) requires a smoke detector for the detection of particulate smoke products as part of the Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS) system. The smoke detector described in this paper is an adaptation of a mature commercial aircraft design for manned spaceflight. Changes made to the original design include upgrading the materials and electronics to space-qualified components, and modifying the mechanical design to withstand launch and landing loads. The results of laboratory characterization of the response of the new design to test particles are presented.
2008-06-29
Technical Paper
2008-01-2083
Laurie Peterson, Jean de Vera, Leticia M. Vega, Nik Adam, John Steele, Tony Rector, Daniel Gazda
The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), also known as Orion, will ferry a crew of up to six astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS), or a crew of up to four astronauts to the moon. The first launch of CEV is scheduled for approximately 2014. A stored water system on the CEV will supply the crew with potable water for various purposes: drinking and food rehydration, hygiene, medical needs, sublimation, and various contingency situations. The current baseline biocide for the stored water system is ionic silver, similar in composition to the biocide used to maintain quality of the water transferred from the Orbiter to the ISS and stored in Contingency Water Containers (CWCs). In the CEV water system, the ionic silver biocide is expected to be depleted from solution due to ionic silver plating onto the surfaces of the materials within the CEV water system, thus negating its effectiveness as a biocide.
2008-06-29
Technical Paper
2008-01-2117
Heather L. Paul, Glenn Waguespack, Bruce Conger, Thomas H. Paul
As part of NASA's initiative to develop an advanced portable life support system (PLSS), a baseline schematic has been chosen that includes gaseous oxygen in a closed circuit ventilation configuration. Supply oxygen enters the suit at the back of the helmet, passes over the astronaut's body, and is extracted at the astronaut's wrists and ankles through the liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG). The extracted gases are then treated using a rapid cycling amine (RCA) system for carbon dioxide and water removal and activated carbon for trace gas removal before being mixed with makeup oxygen and reintroduced into the helmet. Thermal control is provided by a suit water membrane evaporator (SWME). As an extension of the original schematic development, NASA evaluated several Helmet Exhalation Capture System (HECS) configurations as alternatives to the baseline.
2006-07-17
Technical Paper
2006-01-2092
George Steiner, Souzan Maleki Thoresen, Richard Reysa, John Granahan
This paper summarizes the first 5 plus years of on-orbit operation for the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA). The MCA is an essential part of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). The MCA is a mass spectrometer instrument in the US Destiny Laboratory Module of the International Space Station. The MCA provides critical monitoring of six major atmospheric constituents (nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water vapor (H2O)) sampled continuously and automatically in all United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) modules via the Sample Distribution System (SDS). Sample lines have been routed throughout the U.S. modules with valves to facilitate software-automated sequential sampling of the atmosphere in the various modules.
2007-07-09
Technical Paper
2007-01-3087
Sean Murray, David Rosenbush, Edward Hodgson, Victoria Margiott, Richard Crowley, Fred Hunter, Ross Okazaki, Robert Scherer
In future lunar and Mars exploration missions the ability to provide the crewmember navigation information will be critical. Exploration demands that Extravehicular Activity (EVA) astronauts be provided the capability to operate with greater autonomy in accomplishing complex EVA missions than has been the case previously. Robust crew information interfaces and navigation support integral to the EVA spacesuit system are expected to be minimum requirements. Navigation support must allow the EVA crew to determine their position relative to EVA target locations, satellite imagery and maps and assist them in walking or riding to the desired targets on the planetary surface. Together, these needs suggest a requirement for an integrated system that combines data and voice communications, a high performance visual display, and navigation support in a design that is compatible with spacesuit environmental and packaging restrictions and with unique EVA crew interface demands.
2002-07-15
Technical Paper
2002-01-2408
James Morin, Allison Bender, Edward Hodgson, James Yanosy, Scott Downing, Dam Nguyen
An extremely compact heat exchanger is being developed which can boil cryogenic fluids with a liquid heat source at temperatures close to its freezing point. Freezing of the heat source fluid, e.g. water is precluded by the normal flow arrangement. Boiling and superheating of the cryogen occurs as the fluid approaches the heat source in a stack of bonded jet-array laminations. This heat exchanger technology is important in many applications where the storage of fluids at cryogenic temperatures offers substantial advantages in terms of system weight and volume. Often, as in several advanced portable life support system concepts, the advantages include the use of the cryogen as a heat sink in system thermal management. Realizing this benefit and safely conditioning the stored fluid for use requires effective heat transfer between the cryogen and a secondary heat transport fluid.
2008-06-30
Article
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) has announced Rockwell Collins and Hamilton Sundstrand as suppliers of its Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ). Rockwell Collins will provide primary flight control computers, pilot controls, and the horizontal stabilizer trim system, and Hamilton Sundstrand’s contributions include the electric system, fire detection and suppression system, air management system, auxiliary power unit, and flap/slat actuation system.
2012-01-06
Article
Embraer Defense and Security selected Hamilton Sundstrand to supply the Electric Power Generating System for the new Embraer KC-390. The Embraer KC-390 is a twin-engine, medium-lift military transport aircraft, which Embraer Defense and Security is developing with the Brazilian Air Force (FAB).
2009-09-03
Article
Irkut Corp. selected Hamilton Sundstrand to supply multiple systems for the MC-21 commercial aircraft family. Hamilton Sundstrand will develop the advanced Electric Power Generating System, secondary electrical power distribution, auxiliary power unit, wing anti-ice and bleed air-conditioning for the Nitrogen Generation System.
2011-06-19
Article
Hamilton Sundstrand Corp. and AVIC Electromechanical Systems Co. Ltd. (AVIC EM) signed a contract to manufacture vapor cycle cooling systems in Nanjing, China. The joint venture with AVIC EM's Nanjing Engineering Institute of Aerospace Systems (NEIAS) is a 50-50 strategic partnership to build air management system components for the Chinese and international markets.
2011-06-29
Article
Hamilton Sundstrand Corp. and Microturbo signed an agreement to form a partnership for the development of new-generation electrical and bleed APUs and APU installation systems, targeting the business jet segment.
2010-12-06
Article
Hamilton Sundstrand Corp. and AVIC Electromechanical Systems Co. Ltd. (AVIC EM) signed a joint venture framework contract to co-develop and manufacture the electric power system for the Commercial Aviation Corporation of China’s (COMAC) new C919 jetliner.
2009-05-01
Article
Hamilton Sundstrand has extended its Comprehensive Asset Repair and Exchange (CARE) programs with SIA Engineering Co. (SIAEC), a Singapore-based aircraft maintenance company, to provide repair services and asset management for engine and airframe components on Airbus A320 and Boeing 777 aircraft.
2008-06-30
Article
Pratt & Whitney selected Hamilton Sundstrand to provide engine controls and accessories for the company’s next generation of engines for the new Mitsubishi Regional Jet, Bombardier CSeries, and Cessna Citation Columbus business aircraft.
2008-08-12
Article
Sikorsky Aircraft has chosen Hamilton Sundstrand to supply the Utility Management System (UMS) for the CH-53K heavy lift helicopter, which is under development for use by the U.S. Marines. The UMS includes two different digital electronic computers, designed and developed by Hamilton Sundstrand.
2010-05-26
Article
Commercial Aviation Corp. of China Ltd. (COMAC) selected Kidde Aerospace & Defense, a Hamilton Sundstrand business unit, to provide the integrated fire and overheat protection systems for its new C919 aircraft.
2010-08-03
Article
TAT Technologies Ltd. has entered into a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with Lockheed Martin for the procurement of TAT components for the F-16 emergency power unit and additional related components. Total value of the MOA is $4.1 million over the next two years.
2010-04-26
Article
Commercial Aviation Corp. of China Ltd. (COMAC) selected Hamilton Sundstrand to provide the electric power generation and distribution systems for its new C919 aircraft, the value of which is expected to exceed $1 billion in revenue over the life of the program.
2011-10-18
Journal Article
2011-01-2760
Neno Novakovic
In this study, lightning effects on hydraulic transport elements in composite aircraft have been considered for the first time. Based on recent test results and analysis, several forms of possible structural damage and system component failures are presented. A unique approach in analysis has been taken to account that hydraulic transport elements, as a part of several aircraft systems, have a common interface with electrical wiring, and become complex electric networks. When an aircraft is exposed to a direct lightning strike, a metal skin on the wings and fuselage will conduct lightning currents in a way that only a small amount of induced electromagnetic energy will be present on hydraulic transport elements. So, in the past, hydraulic tubes, actuators, manifolds, and all other hydro-mechanical devices, as parts of various aircraft systems, have never been considered as lightning sensitive components.
2008-06-29
Journal Article
2008-01-1971
Souzan Maleki Thoresen, George Steiner, John Granahan
This paper summarizes the first seven plus years of on-orbit operation for the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA). The MCA is an essential part of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). The MCA is a mass spectrometer instrument in the US Destiny Laboratory Module, which provides critical monitoring of six major atmospheric constituents (nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and water vapor (H2O)). These gases are sampled continuously and automatically in all United States On Orbit Segment (USOS) modules via the ISS Sample Delivery System (SDS). Continuous readout of the partial pressures of these gases is critical to verifying safe operation of the Atmosphere Re-vitalization (AR) system, Atmosphere Control System (ACS), and crew safety for Airlock Extravehicular Activity (EVA) preparation.
2008-06-29
Journal Article
2008-01-1966
John E. Granahan, Souzan Maleki Thoresen
The Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA) is a mass spectrometer system that measures the major constituents of the International Space Station (ISS) atmosphere. Experience has indicated that the operating life of the mass spectrometer is limited by the operating life of the ion pump, which maintains mass spectrometer vacuum. This paper summarizes the use of trend data from on orbit operations and ground testing to identify and understand the factors affecting ion pump life and to predict ion pump life on orbit. In addition, potential improvements currently under consideration to increase ion pump life, and therefore mass spectrometer life, are discussed.
2008-06-29
Journal Article
2008-01-2046
David E. Burchfield, William Niu, George Steiner, William O'Hara, John F. Lewis
This paper describes the requirements for and design implementation of an air monitor for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). The air monitor is specified to monitor oxygen, nitrogen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide, and participates with the Environmental Control Life Support System (ECLSS) pressure control system and Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS) to help maintain a breathable and safe environment. The sensing requirements are similar to those delivered by the International Space Station (ISS) air monitor, the Major Constituent Analyzer or MCA (1, 2 and 3), and the predecessors to that instrument, the Skylab Mass Spectrometer (4, 5), although with a shift in emphasis from extended operations to minimized weight. The Orion emphasis on weight and power, and relatively simpler requirements on operating life, allow optimization of the instrument toward the mass of a sensor assembly.
2008-06-29
Journal Article
2008-01-1962
Robert J. Erickson, John Howe, Galen W. Kulp, Steven P. Van Keuren
The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) was originally intended to be installed in ISS Node 3. The OGS rack delivery was accelerated, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006 and installed in the US Laboratory Module. Various modification kits were installed to provide its interfaces, and the OGS was first activated in July of 2007 for 15 hours. In October of 2007 it was again activated for 76 hours with varied production rates and day/night cycling. Operational time in each instance was limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Feedwater will be provided by PWR bag until the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) is delivered to ISS in fall of 2008. This paper will discuss operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.
2012-10-22
Journal Article
2012-01-2106
Nayeff Najjar, Chaitanya Sankavaram, James Hare, Shalabh Gupta, Krishna Pattipati, Rhonda Walthall, Paul DOrlando
This paper addresses the issues of data reduction, visualization, clustering and classification for fault diagnosis and prognosis of the Liquid Cooling System (LCS) in an aircraft. LCS is a cooling system that consists of a left and a right loop, where each loop is composed of a variety of components including a heat exchanger, source control units, a compressor, and a pump. The LCS data and the fault correlation analysis used in the paper are provided by Hamilton Sundstrand (HS) - A United Technologies Company (UTC). This data set includes a variety of sensor measurements for system parameters including temperatures and pressures of different components, along with liquid levels and valve positions of the pumps and controllers. A graphical user interface (GUI) is developed in Matlab that facilitates extensive plotting of the parameters versus each other, and/or time to observe the trends in the data.
2011-10-18
Journal Article
2011-01-2641
William W. Ni, Steven Heitz, Daniel Bartholme, Michael Cass
A pressure regulating valve is a type of flow control device that is a combination of a control orifice and a flow compensator. The compensator orifice modulates its opening to regulate the flow rate at a constant pressure drop across the control orifice. The objective of this paper is an experimental and numerical analysis of flow compensation forces on pressure regulating valve applied on aircraft engine and control systems in a Fuel Metering Unit (FMU). The CFD analysis was applied to analyze and evaluate the various flow rates and patterns and thus estimate the pressure regulating control valve flow compensation force and characteristic curve. The CFD model is used to validate the dynamic behavior of the pressure regulating valve to bypass the fuel flow from a high pressure gear pump and to compensate burn flow of the metering valve. The model can then be used to evaluate and improve the design and operation of the valve for specific operations.
2008-06-29
Technical Paper
2008-01-2116
Christine S. Iacomini, Aaron Powers, Matthew Lewis, Glenn Waguespack, Bruce Conger, Heather L. Paul
Metabolic heat regenerated temperature swing adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for removal and rejection of carbon dioxide (CO2) and heat from a portable life support system (PLSS) to the Martian environment. Previously, hardware was built and tested to demonstrate using heat from simulated, dry ventilation loop gas to affect the temperature swing required to regenerate an adsorbent used for CO2 removal. New testing has been performed using a moist, simulated ventilation loop gas to demonstrate the effects of water condensing and freezing in the heat exchanger during adsorbent regeneration. Also, the impact of MTSA on PLSS design was evaluated by performing thermal balances assuming a specific PLSS architecture. Results using NASA's Extravehicular Activity System Sizing Analysis Tool (EVAS_SAT), a PLSS system evaluation tool, are presented.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2444
Joda Wormhoudt, Joanne H. Shorter, J. Barry McManus, David D. Nelson, Mark S. Zahniser, Andrew Freedman, Melissa Campbell, Clarence T. Chang, Frederick D. Smith
The International Space Station Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) uses regenerable adsorption technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from cabin air. CO2 product water vapor measurements from a CDRA test bed unit at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center were made using a tunable infrared diode laser differential absorption spectrometer (TILDAS) provided by NASA Glenn Research Center. The TILDAS instrument exceeded all the test specifications, including sensitivity, dynamic range, time response, and unattended operation. During the CO2 desorption phase, water vapor concentrations as low as 5 ppmv were observed near the peak of CO2 evolution, rising to levels of ∼40 ppmv at the end of a cycle. Periods of high water concentration (>100 ppmv) were detected and shown to be caused by an experimental artifact.
2004-11-02
Technical Paper
2004-01-3186
Albert L. Markunas
Carrier Injection Sensorless (CIS) rotor position estimation for electric machines depends on the rotor saliency “seen” from the stator terminals. Compared to permanent magnet and induction machines, wound field synchronous machine rotor saliency characteristics are more complex. At typical carrier frequencies subtransient characteristics dominate. Injecting positively rotating carrier voltages at the stator terminals of a machine having rotor saliency produces both positively and negatively rotating carrier currents. The impedances relating currents to injected carrier voltages are derived from the dq reference frame synchronous machine model. Analytical results are compared to simulation and limited test results for an aircraft starter/generator.
2007-07-09
Technical Paper
2007-01-3157
Tim Nalette, William Papale, Fred Smith
Under a NASA-sponsored technology development project, a multi-disciplinary team consisting of industry, academia, and government organizations led by Hamilton Sundstrand is developing an amine based humidity and carbon dioxide (CO2) removal process and prototype equipment for Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) applications. This system employs thermally linked amine sorbent beds operating as a pressure swing adsorption system, using the vacuum of space for regeneration. The prototype hardware was designed based on a two fault tolerant requirement, resulting in a single system that could handle the metabolic water and carbon dioxide load for a crew size of six. Two, full scale prototype hardware sets, consisting of a linear spool valve, actuator and amine sorbent canister, have been manufactured, tested, and subsequently delivered to NASA JSC. This paper presents the design configuration and the pre-delivery performance test results for the CAMRAS hardware.
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