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Viewing 1 to 20 of 20
2009-07-12
Technical Paper
2009-01-2401
M. R. Callahan, A. Lubman, K. D. Pickering
Recovery of potable water from wastewater is essential to the success of long-duration human missions to the moon and Mars. Honeywell International and a team from the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing a wastewater processing subsystem that is based on centrifugal vacuum distillation. The wastewater processor, which is referred to as the cascade distillation subsystem (CDS), uses an efficient multistage thermodynamic process to produce purified water. A CDS unit employing a five-stage distiller engine was designed, built, and delivered to the NASA JSC Advanced Water Recovery Systems Development Facility for performance testing; an initial round of testing was completed in fiscal year 2008 (FY08). Based, in part, on FY08 testing, the system is now in development to support an Exploration Life Support Project distillation comparison test that is expected to begin in 2009.
2009-11-10
Technical Paper
2009-01-3143
Steven Donald Ellersick, Brian Walker, Larry Lamberth, Ravi Laddu, Vicky Haim, Ken Vassie, Phil Downen
SAE ARP 4260 Photometric and Colorimetric Measurement Procedures for Airborne Electronic Flat Panel Displays [1] has recently been revised. This new revision reaffirms that ARP 4260 is pertinent to the aviation industry, changes the content to keep up with the state of the art, and adds clarification where needed. ARP 4260 contains methods used to measure the optical performance of airborne electronic flat panel display systems and is referenced in SAE ARP 4256, Design Objectives for Liquid Crystal Displays for Part 25 (Transport) Aircraft [2] and in SAE AS 8034, Minimum Performance Standard for Airborne Multipurpose Electronic Displays [3].
2008-06-29
Technical Paper
2008-01-2195
M. R. Callahan, A. Lubman, A. MacKnight, E. A. Thomas, K. D. Pickering
Recovery of potable water from wastewater is essential for the success of long-term manned missions to the moon and Mars. Honeywell International and the team consisting of Thermodistillation Company (Kyiv, Ukraine) and NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Crew and Thermal Systems Division are developing a wastewater processing subsystem that is based on centrifugal vacuum distillation. The Wastewater Processing Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) utilizes an innovative and efficient multi-stage thermodynamic process to produce purified water. The rotary centrifugal design of the system also provides gas/liquid phase separation and liquid transport under microgravity conditions. A five-stage prototype of the subsystem was built, delivered and integrated into the NASA JSC Advanced Water Recovery Systems Development Facility for development testing.
2001-07-09
Technical Paper
2001-01-2332
Vipul P. Patel, Richard Barido, Brien Johnson, Thomas Ibarra
The International Space Station (ISS) internal thermal control system (ITCS) has been developed jointly by the Boeing Corporation, Huntsville, Alabama, and Honeywell Engines & Systems, Torrance, California, to meet ISS internal thermal control needs. The ITCS provides heat removal for the critical life support systems and thermal conditioning for numerous experiment racks. The ITCS will be fitted on a number of modules on the ISS. The first module, the US Laboratory Module, was launched in February 2001 and is now operational on the ISS. The dual loop system is comprised of a low-temperature loop (LTL) and a moderate-temperature loop (MTL). Each loop has a pump package assembly (PPA), a system flow control assembly (SFCA), a three-way mixing valve (TWMV), several rack flow control assemblies (RFCA), cold plates, pressure sensors, temperature sensors, a pump bypass assembly (PBA), and a heat exchanger.
2010-03-16
Article
Honeywell International Inc., Defense and Space Electronic Systems located in Albuquerque, NM, awarded Sypris Electronics an estimated $6 million follow-on order to produce electronic assemblies for the F-16 Digital Flight Control Computer (DFLCC).
2008-11-11
Journal Article
2008-01-2934
Simon Yu, Evgeni Ganev
The power and thermal management system (PTMS) developed by Honeywell for aircraft is an integral approach combining the functions of the auxiliary power unit (APU), emergency power unit (EPU), environmental control system (ECS), and thermal management system (TMS). The next generation PTMS discussed in this paper incorporates the new more electric architecture (MEA) and energy efficient aircraft (EEA) initiatives. Advanced system architectures with increased functionality and further integration capabilities with other systems are included. Special emphasis is given to improvements resulting from interactions with the main engine, main electric power generation, and flight actuation. The major drivers for advancement are highlighted, as well as the potential use of new technologies for turbomachinery, heat exchangers, power electronics, and electric machines. More advanced control and protection algorithms are considered.
2008-11-11
Journal Article
2008-01-2861
Evgeni Ganev
This paper discusses the problem of obtaining electric machines (EM) for advanced electric drives (AED) used in more electric architecture (MEA) applicable to aircraft, spacecraft, and military ground vehicles. The AED are analyzed by those aspects of Six Sigma theory that relate to critical-to-quality (CTQ) subjects. Using this approach, weight, volume, reliability, efficiency, and cost CTQ are addressed to develop a balance among them, resulting in an optimized system. The influence of machine controllers and system considerations is discussed. As a part of the machine evaluation process, speeds, bearings, complexities, rotor mechanical and thermal limitations, torque pulsations, currents, and power densities are considered. A methodology for electric machine selection is demonstrated. An example of high-speed, high-performance machine application is shown. A system approach is used for overall electric machine selection and optimization.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2472
Mark Wilson, Harold Cole, Natalee Weir, Bill Oehler, John Steele, Jerry Varsik, Clark Lukens
The ISS (International Space Station) ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) includes two internal coolant loops that utilize an aqueous based coolant for heat transfer. A silver salt biocide had previously been utilized as an additive in the coolant formulation to control the growth and proliferation of microorganisms within the coolant loops. Ground-based and in-flight testing demonstrated that the silver salt was rapidly depleted, and did not act as an effective long-term biocide. Efforts to select an optimal alternate biocide for the ITCS coolant application have been underway and are now in the final stages. An extensive evaluation of biocides was conducted to down-select to several candidates for test trials and was reported on previously.
2006-11-07
Technical Paper
2006-01-3058
Dennis M. Tiry
Recent advances in the state of the art of space-borne data processors and signal processors have occurred that present some unprecedented constraints relating to their power needs. Such processors include the class of multiprocessors providing computational capabilities in the billions of floating point operations per second. Processors of this type tend to require use of modern radiation tolerant or radiation hardened integrated circuits requiring very low voltage power supplies that place considerable challenge on power distribution and conversion within those processing payloads. The primary challenges are efficient conversion of power from the spacecraft power bus to these low voltages and distribution of the very high accompanying currents within the payload while maintaining proper voltage regulation (typically +/− 5%). Some integrated circuits require 10 Amps or more at 1Volt, as an example [3], [6].
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2568
Mark Wilson, Harold Cole, Natalee Weir, Monsi Roman, John Steele, Clark Lukens
The International Space Station (ISS) IATCS (Internal Active Thermal Control System) includes two internal coolant loops that use an aqueous based coolant for heat transfer. A silver salt biocide was used initially as an additive in the coolant formulation to control the growth and proliferation of microorganisms in the coolant loops. Ground-based and in-flight testing has demonstrated that the silver salt is rapidly depleted and not effective as a long-term biocide. Efforts are now underway to select an alternate biocide for the IATCS coolant loop with greatly improved performance. An extensive evaluation of biocides was conducted to select several candidates for test trials.
2009-11-10
Technical Paper
2009-01-3189
Evgeni Ganev, Bulent Sarlioglu
This paper presents new concepts for improving management of the electrical load power regeneration of an aircraft. A novel electrical system that allows for load regeneration back to the distribution bus is described. This approach offers the benefits of reduced weight, volume, and cost, as well as improved reliability. Also described is an electrical machine control mechanism that creates motor power to run the prime mover (i.e., the main engine to dissipate the regenerated power). Instead of main engine generation, this approach can be applied to an auxiliary power unit (APU) or power and thermal management system (PTMS). Background information regarding the regeneration concept is presented. The concept definition and the various modes of operation of the improved system are analyzed and described in detail. Results from the dynamic simulation of the system model are included.
2006-11-07
Technical Paper
2006-01-3061
Mike Koerner, Evgeni Ganev
Launch vehicles that use electric actuators for thrust vector or flight control require a safe, reliable and lightweight source of electrical power. Honeywell, working with NASA Glenn Research Center and Lockheed Martin Space Systems, has developed and successfully tested a turbine-driven electric power generation system which meets these needs. This Turbine Power Unit (TPU) uses hydrogen and oxygen propellants which react catalytically to drive a shaft-speed turboalternator mounted on foil bearings. A high-reactance permanent-magnet machine (HRPMM) was selected for this application. The power conditioning and control electronics can be located within the TPU housing and the hydrogen fuel can be used to pressurize the bearings and electronics and to regeneratively cool the machine. A brassboard unit incorporating many of these features was successfully tested at output power levels from 0 to 138 kilowatts (kW).
2002-11-05
Technical Paper
2002-01-2941
Peter M. Michalakos, Belinda Foor, Phil Fuentes, Stan Pollitt
The quality of outside air during ground operations was analyzed by comparing airport and engine exhaust data to exposure limits and odor thresholds. The results indicated that the outside air may contain compounds in high enough concentrations to be odorous. If the odor is to be treated, the important design criteria that must be considered include the phase of compounds, compound type, location of treatment device on the aircraft, pressure drop, operating temperature, and maintenance interval. Finally, a control strategy is outlined that monitors the air quality as well as the efficiency of an air treatment system.
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2449
Richard Barido, Allen MacKnight, Orlando Rodriguez, Peter Heppel, Robert Lerner, Christine Jarvis, Kriss Kennedy, Luis Trevino
The advanced inflatable airlock (AIA) system was developed for the Space Launch Initiative (SLI). The objective of the AIA system is to greatly reduce the cost associated with performing extravehicular activity (EVA) from manned launch vehicles by reducing launch weight and volume from previous hard airlock systems such as the Space Shuttle and Space Station airlocks. The AIA system builds upon previous technology from the TransHab inflatable structures project, from Space Shuttle and Space Station Airlock systems, and from terrestrial flexible structures projects. The AIA system design is required to be versatile and capable of modification to fit any platform or vehicle needing EVA capability. During the basic phase of the program, the AIA conceptual design and key features were developed to help meet the SLI program goals of reduced cost and program risk.
2008-11-11
Technical Paper
2008-01-2902
Evgeni Ganev, Mike Koerner, William Warr
In association with NASA Glenn Research Center and Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Honeywell has developed and successfully tested an electric power generation system that uses non-toxic hydrogen and oxygen propellants that are reacted catalytically. The resulting fuel-rich gases drive a turbogenerator. Speed control of this system is challenging due to highly variable electric load profile. Discrete two-position valves were used to control the propellant flow for improved reliability compared to proportional valves. This “bang-bang” speed control method exhibits variation in turbine acceleration and deceleration with load. The control thresholds for the turbine speed are adjusted based on load so as to compensate for increased speed overshoot and undershoot.
2010-09-30
Technical Paper
2010-01-1663
Ratan Khatwa, Jeff Lancaster, Kevin Conner, Howard Glover
This paper presents the results of a human factors flight test evaluation of a display of Enhanced Traffic Situational Awareness on the Airport Surface with Indications and Alerts (SURF IA). The study is an element of the FAA-sponsored Surface Conflict Detection and Alerting with Consideration of Arrival Applications program. The objective of the flight test was to conduct a comparative evaluation of two candidate SURF IA displays: a detailed Airport Surface Situation Awareness (ASSA) display and a runways-only Final Approach Runway Occupancy Awareness (FAROA) display. Six pilots with a current Air Transport Pilot Certificate each completed 18 scenarios. A Beechcraft King Air C-90 and a Cessna Citation Sovereign aircraft were deployed for the flight tests. The scenarios were conducted at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and at Snohomish County Paine Field Airport, with each aircraft acting as ‘traffic’ for the other aircraft.
2005-07-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2892
Dina El Sherif, James C. Knox
An important aspect of air revitalization for life support in spacecraft is the removal of carbon dioxide from cabin air. Several types of carbon dioxide removal systems are in use or have been proposed for use in spacecraft life support systems. These systems rely on various removal techniques that employ different architectures and media for scrubbing CO2, such as permeable membranes, liquid amine, adsorbents, and absorbents. Sorbent systems have been used since the first manned missions. The current state of key technology is the existing International Space Station (ISS) Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA), a system that selectively removes carbon dioxide from the cabin atmosphere. The CDRA system was launched aboard UF-2 in February 2001 and resides in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory module. During the past four years, the CDRA system has experienced operational limitations.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2448
Charles E. Verostko, Chris Carrier, Barry W. Finger
This paper addresses the derivation of chemical ersatz recipes for use in the evaluation of development hardware designed for advanced spacecraft water recovery systems. The recipes simulate characteristics of wastewater generated on a transit mission and on an early planetary base (EPB). In addition, recipes are provided which simulate the water quality of the early planetary base wastewater as it moves through a combination biological and physical-chemical water recovery system. These ersatz are considered to be accurate representations of the wastewater as it passes through primary, secondary, and tertiary processing stages. The EPB ersatz formulas are based on chemical analyses of an integrated water recovery system performance test that was conducted over a period of one year. The major inorganic and organic chemical impurities in the raw wastewater, and in the effluent from the various subsystems, were identified and quantified.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2470
Vipul P. Patel, Dale Winton, Thomas H. Ibarra
The Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) has been developed jointly by Boeing Corporation, Huntsville, Alabama and Honeywell Engines & Systems, Torrance, California to meet the internal thermal control needs for the International Space Station (ISS). The ITCS provides heat removal for the critical life support systems and thermal conditioning for numerous experiment racks. The ITCS will be fitted on a number of modules on the ISS. The first US Element containing the ITCS, Node 1, was launched in December 1998. Since Node 1 does not contain a pump to circulate the fluid it was not filled with ITCS fluid until after the US Laboratory Module was installed. The second US Element module, US Laboratory Module, which contains the pumps and all the major ITCS control hardware, was launched in February 2001. The third US Element containing the ITCS, the US Airlock, was launched in July 2001.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2548
Dina El Sherif
An important aspect of air revitalization for life support in spacecraft is the removal of carbon dioxide from cabin air. Several types of carbon dioxide removal systems are in use in spacecraft life support. These systems rely on various removal techniques that employ different architectures and media for scrubbing CO2, such as permeable membranes, liquid amine, adsorbents, and absorbents. Sorbent systems have been used since the first manned missions. The current state of key technology is the existing International Space Station (ISS) Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA), a system that selectively removes carbon dioxide from the cabin atmosphere. The CDRA system was launched aboard UF-2 in February 2001 and resides in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory module. During the past three years, the CDRA system has operated with varying degrees of success.
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