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1980-09-01
Technical Paper
800956
Vincent J. Ursini, Lawrence W. Evers, Raymond W. Kauppila, David A. Carlson
The 1980 SAE sponsored Midwest Baja was attended by thirteen schools. The Michigan Technological University vehicle finished fourth overall in the competition but first of the first year entries. Participation in this event requires a considerable investment of time and resources on the part of the students and faculty but the rewards are great. The student chapter faculty advisor sees the activity as an enjoyable competitive experience for the SAE student members to learn first hand and in a responsible way what it means to be an engineer. The design professor sees the project as one of the best tools for teaching and learning the interrelation of product design, manufacture, time schedules, costs and project management. The technical advisors see the activity as an opportunity for the participating students to operate in a complex coordinated group effort that is a realistic model of industry. The students see the activity as an important part of their education.
1982-02-01
Technical Paper
821049
Vincent J. Ursini, Edward C. Chiang, John H. Johnson
A Vehicle-Engine-Cooling (VEC) system computer simulation model was used to study the transient performance of control devices and their temperature settings on oil, coolant and cab temperatures. The truck used in the study was an International Harvester COF-9670 cab over chassis heavy-duty vehicle equipped with a standard cab heater, a Cummins NTC-350 diesel engine with a McCord radiator and standard cooling system components and aftercooler. Input data from several portions of a Columbus to Bloomington, Indiana route were used from the Vehicle Mission Simulation (VMS) program to determine engine and vehicle operating conditions for the VEC system computer simulation model. The control devices investigated were the standard thermostat, the Kysor fan-clutch and shutter system. The effect of shutterstat location on shutter performance along with thermostat, shutter and fan activation temperature settings were investigated for ambient temperatures of 32, 85 and 100°F.
1982-02-01
Technical Paper
821048
Edward C. Chiang, Vincent J. Ursini, John H. Johnson
A computer simulation program was developed to simulate the thermal responses of an on-highway, heavy duty diesel powered truck in transient operation for evaluation of cooling system performance. Mathematical models of the engine, heat exchangers, lubricating oil system, thermal control sensors (thermostat and shutterstat), auxiliary components, and the cab were formulated and calibrated to laboratory experimental data. The component models were assembled into the vehicle engine cooling system model and used to predict air-to-boil temperatures. The model has the capability to predict real time coolant, oil and cab temperatures using vehicle simulation input data over various routes.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1242
Harsha Shankar Surenhalli, Kiran Premchand, John H. Johnson, Gordon Parker
The catalyzed particulate filter (CPF), used in conjunction with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) is an important aftertreatment device used to meet Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) heavy-duty diesel emission standards for particulate matter (PM). Numerical modeling of these exhaust after-treatment devices decreases the time and cost of development involved. Modeling CPF active regeneration gives insight into the PM oxidation kinetics, which helps in reducing the regeneration fuel penalty. As seen from experimental data, active regeneration of the CPF results in a significant temperature increase into the CPF (up to 8°C/sec) which affects the oxidation rate of particulate matter (PM). PM oxidation during active regeneration was determined to be a function of filter PM loading, inlet temperature and inlet hydrocarbon concentration.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0948
Le (Emma) Zhao, Ahmed Abdul Moiz, Jeffrey Naber, Seong-Young Lee, Sam Barros, William Atkinson
Abstract High-speed spray-to-spray liquid impingement could be an effective phenomenon for the spray propagation and droplet vaporization. To achieve higher vaporization efficiency, impingement from two-hole nozzles is analyzed in this paper. This paper focuses on investigating vaporization mechanism as a function of the impingement location and the collision breakup process provided by two-hole impinging jet nozzles. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) is adopted to do simulation. Lagrangian model is used to predict jet-to-jet impingement and droplet breakup conditions while KH-RT breakup and O'Rourke collision models are implemented for the simulation. The paper includes three parts: First, a single spray injected into an initially quiescent constant volume chamber using the Lagrangian approach is simulated to identify the breakup region, which will be considered as a reference to study two-hole impinging jet nozzles.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1059
Harsha Shankar Surenahalli, Gordon Parker, John H. Johnson
Abstract Diesel Oxidation Catalysts (DOC) are used on heavy duty diesel engine applications and experience large internal temperature variations from 150 to 600°C. The DOC oxidizes the CO and HC in the exhaust to CO2 and H2O and oxidizes NO to NO2. The oxidation reactions are functions of its internal temperatures. Hence, accurate estimation of internal temperatures is important both for onboard diagnostic and aftertreatment closed loop control strategies. This paper focuses on the development of a reduced order model and an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) state estimator for a DOC. The reduced order model simulation results are compared to experimental data. This is important since the reduced order model is used in the EKF estimator to predict the CO, NO, NO2 and HC concentrations in the DOC and at the outlet. The estimator was exercised using transient drive cycle engine data. The closed loop EKF improves the temperature estimate inside the DOC compared to the open loop estimator.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1044
Kiran C. Premchand, Krishnan Raghavan, John H. Johnson
Abstract Numerical models of aftertreatment devices are increasingly becoming indispensable tools in the development of aftertreatment systems that enable modern diesel engines to comply with exhaust emissions regulations while minimizing the cost and development time involved. Such a numerical model was developed at Michigan Technological University (MTU) [1] and demonstrated to be able to simulate the experimental data [2] in predicting the characteristic pressure drop and PM mass retained during passive oxidation [3] and active regeneration [4] of a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CPF) on a Cummins ISL engine. One of the critical aspects of a calibrated numerical model is its usability - in other words, how useful is the model in predicting the pressure drop and the PM mass retained in another particulate filter on a different engine without the need for extensive recalibration.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0319
Khanh Cung, Meghraj Bhagat, Anqi Zhang, Seong-Young Lee
Particular matter (PM) has been greatly concerned over the recent decades due to the constantly increasing restriction on its effect on environmental aspect. Oxygenated fuel such as dimethyl ether (DME) has been known to have beneficial impact on diesel engine emissions in terms of zero soot formation. In current study, under several ambient conditions including surrounding gas temperature and oxygen percentages, soot and emission formation of DME spray is investigated to provide a comparison with other diesel surrogate (n-heptane) and JP-8 surrogate fuels. One important work is to develop a number of chemical kinetic mechanisms with soot chemistry including the growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and nitro oxides (NOx) formation. Using the developing detailed mechanisms, several numerical approaches were introduced to provide an integrated picture of emission formations.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0250
Meghraj Bhagat, Khanh Cung, Jaclyn Johnson, Seong-Young Lee, Jeffrey Naber, Sam Barros
Water spray characterization of a multi-hole injector under pressures and temperatures representative of engine-relevant conditions was investigated for naturally aspirated and boosted engine conditions. Experiments were conducted in an optically accessible pressure vessel using a high-speed Schlieren imaging to visualize the transient water spray. The experimental conditions included a range of injection pressures of 34, 68, and 102 bar and ambient temperatures of 30 - 200°C, which includes flash-boiling and non-flash-boiling conditions. Transient spray tip penetration and spray angle were characterized via image processing of raw Schlieren images using Matlab code. The CONVERGE CFD software was used to simulate the water spray obtained experimentally in the vessel. CFD parameters were tuned and validated against the experimental results of spray profile and spray tip penetration measured in the combustion vessel (CV).
Viewing 1 to 9 of 9