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Viewing 1 to 30 of 103
2009-05-19
Technical Paper
2009-01-2047
Ketan G. Kshirsagar, Scott R. Kiel, Mohan D. Rao
This paper describes the design, development and validation of a muffler for reducing exhaust noise from a commercial tele-handler. It also describes the procedure for modeling and optimizing the exhaust muffler along with experimental measurement for correlating the sound transmission loss (STL). The design and tuning of the tele-handler muffler was based on several factors including overall performance, cost, weight, available space, and ease of manufacturing. The analysis for predicting the STL was conducted using the commercial software LMS Virtual Lab (LMS-VL), while the experimental validation was carried out in the laboratory using the two load setup. First, in order to gain confidence in the applicability of LMS-VL, the STL of some simple expansion mufflers with and without extended inlet/outlet and perforations was considered. The STL of these mufflers were predicted using the traditional plane wave transfer matrix approach.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0651
Zun Wang, Jaehoon Han, Devadatta Mukutmoni
Abstract At the onset of soak, air and surface temperatures in an engine bay enclosure are elevated since temperature of heat sources are high while convective cooling is sharply reduced as a result of airflow being shut off from the inlet grilles of the vehicle leading to temperature spikes. Accurate simulation of this important thermal and flow regime that is natural convection driven, highly transient and complex is therefore very important. In this investigation, we simulate flow in the engine bay at the onset of soak with fixed thermal boundary conditions where the geometries representing the engine bay and components are simplified. Good agreement was observed with detailed experimental data available in references for both velocities and temperatures.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2516
Darin Kowalski, Carl Anderson, Jason Blough
As automotive torque converters decrease in both diameter and axial length, the effects of cavitation in the torque converter becomes increasingly important on noise, efficiency, and performance goals. Cavitation is the formation and collapse of vapor bubbles in a working fluid when local static pressure falls below the vapor pressure of the working fluid. A technique to detect cavitation in automotive torque converters using nearfield acoustical measurements is presented. The technique concentrates on high frequency noise that is associated with the collapse of vapor bubbles. The nearfield acoustical technique is compared to two other techniques using static pressure measurements inside the torque converter; one on the torque converter stator blades and the other on the torque converter pump blades. A microwave telemetry transmitter was used to obtain data from inside the torque converter in both previous investigations.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2414
Jason R. Blough, Geoffrey Gwaltney, James Vizanko
A study was performed to understand how the environment affects the results of J-192 pass-by noise testing of snowmobiles. This study involved measuring the sound pressure at 7 different microphone positions due to both speaker excitation and various snowmobiles passing through the microphone array. Simultaneous to the sound measurements, weather conditions were recorded including wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, snow depth, and in some cases ground hardness. All measured data was then used to determine which environmental factors influenced the measured sound pressures the most. Finally, a sound power approach was also used to measure the snowmobile pass-by noise to determine whether this method was more repeatable than the single microphone approach which showed variations of over 7 dBA over the course of testing.
2005-11-01
Technical Paper
2005-01-3626
Benjamin C. Andrus, Scott L. Post
This paper describes the results of experiments that were performed using a Ground Research Vehicle (GRV) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, CA and a comparison with computational results. The GRV is a modified 1984 General Motors (GMC) van and measures 40 feet long and 9 feet high, with a base area of 83 by 83, and it weighs 10260 lbs and holds a crew of up to three. Air data is measured from a nose-boom, 2 global positioning (GPS) units, and an absolute Honeywell Pressure Transducer with 4 Electronic Signal Processor (ESP) scanners and 64 surface pressure ports. This allows for detailed measurements of the surface pressure profiles around the vehicle. The total vehicle drag is estimated from coast-down tests, while the pressure component of the drag force may be calculated by integrating the pressure profiles on the front and base of the vehicle.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0400
Jeffrey Naber, Jason R. Blough, Dave Frankowski, Monroe Goble, John E. Szpytman
Combustion knock detection and control in internal combustion engines continues to be an important feature in engine management systems. In spark-ignition engine applications, the frequency of occurrence of combustion knock and its intensity are controlled through a closed-looped feedback system to maintain knock at levels that do not cause engine damage or objectionable audible noise. Many methods for determination of the feedback signal for combustion knock in spark-ignition internal combustion engines have been employed with the most common technique being measurement of engine vibration using an accelerometer. With this technique single or multiple piezoelectric accelerometers are mounted on the engine and vibrations resulting from combustion knock and other sources are converted to electrical signals. These signals are input to the engine control unit and are processed to determine the signal strength during a period of crank-angle when combustion knock is expected.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0467
Hasan Mohammed, Antonio P. Triana, Song-Lin Yang, John H. Johnson
A numerical model to simulate the filtration and regeneration performance of catalyzed diesel particulate filters (CPFs) was developed at Michigan Technological University (MTU). The mathematical formulation of the model and some results are described. The model is a single channel (inlet and outlet) representation of the flow while the thermal and catalytic regeneration framework is based on a 2-layer approach. The 2-layer model can simulate particulate matter (PM) oxidation by thermal and ‘catalytic’ means of oxidation with O2. Several improvements were made to this basic model and are described in this paper. A model to simulate PM oxidation by NO2/Temperature entering the particulate filter and oxidizing the PM in the two layers of the PM cake was developed. This model can be used to simulate the performance of filters with catalyst washcoats and uncatalyzed filters placed downstream of diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs), as in the continuously regenerating traps, CRT's®.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0266
Antonio P. Triana, John H. Johnson, Song L. Yang, Kirby J. Baumgard
An experimental and computational study was performed to evaluate the performance of the CRT™ technology with an off-highway engine with a cooled low pressure loop EGR system. The MTU-Filter 1D DPF code predicts the particulate mass evolution (deposition and oxidation) in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) during simultaneous loading and during thermal and NO2-assisted regeneration conditions. It also predicts the pressure drop across the DPF, the flow and temperature fields, the solid filtration efficiency and the particle number distribution downstream of the DPF. A DOC model was also used to predict the NO2 upstream of the DPF. The DPF model was calibrated to experimental data at temperatures from 230°C to 550°C, and volumetric flow rates from 9 to 39 actual m3/min.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2265
Jason R. Blough
An automobile and a tracked military vehicle were instrumented with multiple tachometers, one for each drive wheel/sprocket and operated with accelerometers mounted at suspension, chassis, and powertrain locations on the vehicles. The Time Variant Discrete Fourier Transform, TVDFT, order tracking method was then used to extract the order tracks and operating shapes estimated based on each tachometer. It is shown that under some conditions a different operating shape is excited by each of the wheels/sprockets simultaneously. This is due to the asymmetries present in the vehicles. The strengths of the TVDFT order tracking method are shown for this type of analysis, which is difficult due to the closeness, within 0.001 orders, and crossing of the orders. Benefits of using multiple tachometers and advanced order tracking methods become apparent for solving a class of noise and vibration problems.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0059
Seshasai Srinivasan, Franz X. Tanner, Jan Macek, Milos Polacek
The objective of this study is the development of a computationally efficient CFD-based tool for finding optimal engine operating conditions with respect to fuel consumption and emissions. The optimization algorithm employed is based on the steepest descent method where an adaptive cost function is minimized along each line search using an effective backtracking strategy. The adaptive cost function is based on the penalty method, where the penalty coefficient is increased after every line search. The parameter space is normalized and, thus, the optimization occurs over the unit cube in higher-dimensional space. The application of this optimization tool is demonstrated for the Sulzer S20, a central-injection, non-road DI diesel engine. The optimization parameters are the start of injection of the two pulses, the duration of each pulse, the duration of the dwell, the exhaust gas recirculation rate and the boost pressure.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1198
Ming Cheng, Lei Feng, Bo Chen
This paper investigates the aging performance of the lithium ion cobalt oxide battery pack of a single shaft parallel hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) under different ambient temperatures. Varying ambient temperature of HEVs results in different battery temperature and then leads to different aging performance of the battery pack. Battery aging is reflected in the increasing of battery internal resistance and the decreasing of battery capacity. In this paper, a single shaft parallel hybrid electric vehicle model is built by integrating Automotive Simulation Model (ASM) from dSPACE and AutoLion-ST battery model from ECPower to realize the co-simulation of HEV powertrain in the common MATLAB/Simulink platform. The battery model is a physics-based and thermally-coupled battery (TCB) model, which enables the investigation of battery capacity degradation and aging. Standard driving cycle with differing ambient temperatures is tested using developed HEV model.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0217
William Buller, Rini Sherony, Brian Wilson, Michelle Wienert
Abstract To reduce the number and severity of accidents, automakers have invested in active safety systems to detect and track neighboring vehicles to prevent accidents. These systems often employ RADAR and LIDAR, which are not degraded by low lighting conditions. In this research effort, reflections from deer were measured using two sensors often employed in automotive active safety systems. Based on a total estimate of one million deer-vehicle collisions per year in the United States, the estimated cost is calculated to be $8,388,000,000 [1]. The majority of crashes occurs at dawn and dusk in the Fall and Spring [2]. The data includes tens of thousands of RADAR and LIDAR measurements of white-tail deer. The RADAR operates from 76.2 to 76.8 GHz. The LIDAR is a time-of-flight device operating at 905 nm. The measurements capture the deer in many aspects: standing alone, feeding, walking, running, does with fawns, deer grooming each other and gathered in large groups.
2009-05-19
Journal Article
2009-01-2229
Brandon J. Dilworth, Jason R. Blough
Noise concerns regarding snowmobiles have increased in the recent past. Current standards, such as SAE J192 are used as guidelines for government agencies and manufacturers to regulate noise emissions for all manufactured snowmobiles. Unfortunately, the test standards available today produce results with variability that is much higher than desired. The most significant contributor to the variation in noise measurements is the test surface. The test surfaces can either be snow or grass and affects the measurement in two very distinct ways: sound propagation from the source to the receiver and the operational behavior of the snowmobile. Data is presented for a known sound pressure speaker source and different snowmobiles on various test days and test surfaces. Relationships are shown between the behavior of the sound propagation and track interaction to the ground with the pass-by noise measurements.
2009-05-19
Technical Paper
2009-01-2228
Brandon J. Dilworth, Jason R. Blough
As noise concerns for snowmobiles become of greater interest for governing bodies, standards such as SAE J192 are implemented for regulation. Specific to this pass-by noise standard, and unlike many other pass-by tests, multiple non-standardized test surfaces are allowed to be used. Manufacturers must understand how the machines behave during these tests to know how to best improve the measured noise levels. Data is presented that identifies the contributions of different sources for different snowmobiles on various test surface conditions. Adaptive resampling for Doppler removal, frequency response functions and order tracking methods are implemented in order to best understand what components affect the overall measurement during the pass-by noise test.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1406
Alessandro Montanaro, Marianna Migliaccio, Luigi Allocca, Valentina Fraioli, Seong-Young Lee, Anqi Zhang, Jeffrey Naber
Abstract This paper reports an experimental and numerical investigation on the spatial and temporal liquid- and vapor-phase distributions of diesel fuel spray under engine-like conditions. The high pressure diesel spray was investigated in an optically-accessible constant volume combustion vessel for studying the influence of the k-factor (0 and 1.5) of a single-hole axial-disposed injector (0.100 mm diameter and 10 L/d ratio). Measurements were carried out by a high-speed imaging system capable of acquiring Mie-scattering and schlieren in a nearly simultaneous fashion mode using a high-speed camera and a pulsed-wave LED system. The time resolved pair of schlieren and Mie-scattering images identifies the instantaneous position of both the vapor and liquid phases of the fuel spray, respectively. The studies were performed at three injection pressures (70, 120, and 180 MPa), 23.9 kg/m3 ambient gas density, and 900 K gas temperature in the vessel.
2014-05-10
Journal Article
2014-01-9121
Robert E Smith, Edward Lumsdaine
Since transient vehicle HVAC computational fluids (CFD) simulations take too long to solve in a production environment, the goal of this project is to automatically create a lumped-parameter flow network from a steady-state CFD that solves nearly instantaneously. The data mining algorithm k-means is implemented to automatically discover flow features and form the network (a reduced order model). The lumped-parameter network is implemented in the commercial thermal solver MuSES to then run as a fully transient simulation. Using this network a “localized heat transfer coefficient” is shown to be an improvement over existing techniques. Also, it was found that the use of the clustering created a new flow visualization technique. Finally, fixing clusters near equipment newly demonstrates a capability to track localized temperatures near specific objects (such as equipment in vehicles).
2009-05-19
Technical Paper
2009-01-2163
Chad M. Walber, Jason R. Blough, Carl Anderson, Mark Johnson
Performing acoustic measurements on or near engines, transmissions, as well as in other circumstances where the environment is hazardous and harsh for microphones requires special precautions. Fluids inevitably leak, and the possibility of transducer damage can be very high without proper protection. Properly protecting microphones during testing allows for consistent data quality in these hazardous and difficult environments. While this paper will present the use of a 5 mil Nitrile cover which protects against many fluids within the scope of automotive testing, including water, hydrocarbons, and alcohols, as well as having good heat resistance and high strength, the concepts developed are applicable to other types of microphone protective mechanisms. Acoustic sensitivity was measured and used to calculate the change of the microphone's response after the treatment is applied, as well as after being exposed to various contaminants.
1998-02-01
Technical Paper
980076
Michael L. Bohn, Stefan U. Jurthe, Klaus J. Weinmann
A new press/die system for restraining force control has been developed in order to facilitate an increased level of process control in sheet metal forming. The press features a built-in system for controlling drawbead penetration in real time. The die has local force transducers built into the draw radius of the lower tooling. These sensors are designed to give process information useful for the drawbead control. This paper focuses on developing models of the drawbead actuators and the die shoulder sensors. The actuator model is useful for developing optimal control methods. The sensor characterization is necessary in order to develop a relationship between the raw sensor outputs and a definitive process characteristic such as drawbead restraining force (DBRF). Closed loop control of local specific punch force is demonstrated using the die shoulder sensor and a PID controller developed off-line with the actuator model.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
981018
Jay Meldrum, Neil Hay
Laboratory Simulation Testing is widely accepted as an effective tool for validation of automotive designs. In a simulation test, response data are measured whilst a vehicle is in service or tested at a proving ground. These responses are reproduced in the laboratory by mounting the vehicle or a subassembly of the vehicle in a test rig and applying force and displacements by servo hydraulic actuators. The data required as an input to the servo hydraulics, the drive files, are determined by an iterative procedure which overcomes the non linearity in the test specimen and the test rig system. Under certain circumstances, the iteration does not converge, converges too slowly or converges and then diverges. This paper uses mathematical and computer models in a study of the reasons why systems fail to convergence and makes recommendations about the management of the simulation test.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980546
Cornelius N. Opris, John H. Johnson
A 2-D CFD model was developed to describe the heat transfer, and reaction kinetics in a honeycomb structured ceramic diesel particulate trap. This model describes the steady state as well as the transient behavior of the flow and heat transfer during the trap regeneration processes. The trap temperature profile was determined by numerically solving the 2-D unsteady energy equation including the convective, heat conduction and viscous dissipation terms. The convective terms were based on a 2-D analytical flow field solution derived from the conservation of mass and momentum equations (Opris, 1997). The reaction kinetics were described using a discretized first order Arrhenius function. The 2-D term describing the reaction kinetics and particulate matter conservation of mass was added to the energy equation as a source term in order to represent the particulate matter oxidation. The filtration model describes the particulate matter accumulation in the trap.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980545
Cornelius N. Opris, John H. Johnson
A 2-D computational model was developed to describe the flow and filtration processes, in a honeycomb structured ceramic diesel particulate trap. This model describes the steady state trap loading, as well as the transient behavior of the flow and filtration processes. The theoretical model includes the effect of a copper fuel additive on trap loading and transient operation. The convective terms were based on a 2-D analytical flow field solution derived from the conservation of mass and momentum equations. The filtration theory incorporated in the time dependent numerical code included the diffusion, inertia, and direct interception mechanisms. Based on a measured upstream particle size distribution, using the filtration theory, the downstream particle size distribution was calculated. The theoretical filtration efficiency, based on particle size distribution, agreed very well (within 1%) with experimental data for a number of different cases.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970986
S. G. Xu, M. L. Bohn, K. J. Weinmann
The paper reviews the role of drawbeads in sheet metal stamping. The design of drawbeads is discussed in depth, with treatment of different bead cross sections, bead end shapes, and bead materials. International standards and practices are included. This is followed by the historical development of the modeling of the drawbead restraining force, starting with basic equilibrium approaches, and leading to the use of the finite element method which permits the study of drawbead effects on sheet metal flow in three dimensions. Finally, the potential of active drawbeads is described based upon ongoing research which is directed toward closed-loop computer control of the stamping process through adjustment of the drawbead penetration.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0860
Jeffrey Naber, Eric K. Bradley, John E. Szpytman
Today's advanced technology engines have a high content of electronic actuation requiring sophisticated real-time embedded software sensing and control. To enable research on such engines, a system with a flexible engine control unit (ECU) that can be rapidly configured and programmed is desired. Such a system is being used in the Advanced Internal Combustion Engine (AICE) Laboratories at Michigan Tech University (MTU) for research on a multi-cylinder spark-ignited gasoline, a high pressure common rail diesel and a single cylinder alternative fuels research engine. The system combines a production ECU with a software development system utilizing Mathworks Simulink/Stateflow © modeling tools. The interface in the Simulink modeling environment includes a library of modeling and interface blocks to the production Operating System (OS), Low Level Drivers (LLD) and CAN-based calibration tool.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0879
Paramjot Singh, Abishek M. Thalagavara, Jeffrey Naber, John H. Johnson, Susan T. Bagley
Passive regeneration (oxidation of particulate matter without using an external energy source) of particulate filters in combination with active regeneration is necessary for low load engine operating conditions. For low load conditions, the exhaust gas temperatures are less than 250°C and the PM oxidation rate due to passive regeneration is less than the PM accumulation rate. The objective of this research was to experimentally investigate active regeneration of a catalyzed particulate filter (CPF) using diesel fuel injection in the exhaust gas after the turbocharger and before a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and to collect data for extending the MTU 1-D 2-layer model to include the simulation of active regeneration. The engine used in this study was a 2002 Cummins ISM turbo charged 10.8 L heavy duty diesel engine with cooled EGR. The exhaust after-treatment system consisted of a Johnson Matthey DOC and CPF (a CCRT®).
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1551
Franz X. Tanner, Seshasai Srinivasan
A gradient-based optimization tool has been developed and, in conjunction with a CFD code, utilized in the search of optimal fuel injection strategies. The approach taken uses a steepest descent method with an adaptive cost function, where the line search is performed with a fast-converging backtracking algorithm. The adaptive cost function is based on the penalty method, where the penalty coefficient is increased after every line search. The parameter space is normalized and, thus, the optimization occurs over the unit cube in higher-dimensional space. The application of this optimization tool is demonstrated for a non-road version of the Sulzer S20 DI diesel engine which, for these simulations, is equipped with a multi-orifice, asynchronous injection system. This system permits an independent timing of the fuel pulses, and each orifice has its own diameter and injection direction.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2557
Darin Kowalski, Carl Anderson, Jason Blough
As automotive torque converters decrease in both diameter and axial length, the effects of cavitation in the torque converter becomes increasingly important on noise, efficiency, and performance goals. Therefore, a cavitation prediction technique is developed in this investigation. In a previous investigation it was shown that cavitation is effected by inlet temperature, charge pressure, and K-factor. The prediction technique is devolved to encompass these variables. A dimensional analysis using the power product method is performed with all relevant variables. The nearfield acoustical cavitation detection technique, discussed in the previous investigation, is used to obtain experimental results from a torque converter test lab. The test matrix for the experimental results was constructed to include effects from inlet temperature, charge pressure, and K-factor. The data obtained experimentally is used to curve fit the results found through the power product method.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0248
Franz X. Tanner, Seshasai Srinivasan
A global optimization method has been developed for an engine simulation code and utilized in the search of optimal fuel injection strategies. This method uses a Lagrange interpolation function which interpolates engine output data generated at the vertices and the intermediate points of the input parameters. This interpolation function is then used to find a global minimum over the entire parameter set, which in turn becomes the starting point of a CFD-based optimization. The CFD optimization is based on a steepest descent method with an adaptive cost function, where the line searches are performed with a fast-converging backtracking algorithm. The adaptive cost function is based on the penalty method, where the penalty coefficient is increased after every line search. The parameter space is normalized and, thus, the optimization occurs over the unit cube in higher-dimensional space.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0168
Seshasai Srinivasan, Jan Macek, Milos Polacek, Franz X. Tanner
A previously developed CFD-based optimization tool is utilized to find optimal engine operating conditions with respect to fuel consumption and emissions. The optimization algorithm employed is based on the steepest descent method where an adaptive cost function is minimized along each line search using an effective backtracking strategy. The adaptive cost function is based on the penalty method, where the penalty coefficient is increased after every line search. The parameter space is normalized and, thus, the optimization occurs over the unit cube in higher-dimensional space. The application of this optimization tool is demonstrated for the Sulzer S20, a central-injection, non-road DI diesel engine. The optimization parameters are the start of injection of the two pulses of a split injection system, the duration of each pulse, the exhaust gas recirculation rate, the boost pressure and the compression ratio.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0147
Egel Urip, Song-Lin Yang
This study focuses on how to predict hot spots of one of the cylinders of a V8 5.4 L FORD engine running at full load. The KIVA code with conjugate heat transfer capability to simulate the fast transient heat transfer process between the gas and the solid phases has been developed at the Michigan Technological University and will be used in this study. Liquid coolant flow was simulated using FLUENT and will be used as a boundary condition to account for the heat loss to the cooling fluid. In the first step of calculation, the coupling between the gas and the solid phases will be solved using the KIVA code. A 3D transient wall heat flux at the gas-solid interface is then compiled and used along with the heat loss information from the FLUENT data to obtain the temperature distribution for the engine metal components, such as cylinder wall, cylinder head, etc.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0550
Zhimin Xi, Byeng D. Youn, David A. Gorsich
This paper attempts to integrate a derivative-free probability analysis method to Reliability-Based Robust Design Optimization (RBRDO). The Eigenvector Dimension Reduction (EDR) method is used for the probability analysis method. It has been demonstrated that the EDR method is more accurate and efficient than the Second-Order Reliability Method (SORM) for reliability and quality assessment. Moreover, it can simultaneously evaluate both reliability and quality without any extra expense. Two practical engineering problems (vehicle side impact and layered bonding plates) are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the EDR method.
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