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Viewing 1 to 30 of 131
2011-06-13
Technical Paper
2011-38-0005
Jason Mickey, Eric Loth, Colin Bidwell
A new technique is proposed for computing particle concentrations and fluxes with Lagrangian trajectories. This method calculates particle concentrations based on the volume of a parcel element, or cloud, at the flux plane compared against the initial volume and is referred to as the Lagrangian Parcel Volume (LPV) method. This method combines the steady-state accuracy of area-based methods with the unsteady capabilities of bin-based methods. The LPV method results for one-dimensional (1D) unsteady flows and linear two-dimensional (2D) steady flows show that a quadrilateral element shape composed of a single parcel (with four edge particles) is capable of accurately predicting particle concentrations. However, nonlinear 2D flows can lead to concave or crossed quadrilaterals which produce significant numerical errors.
2007-07-09
Technical Paper
2007-01-3142
Michael S. Roberts, Mary E. Hummerick, Sharon L. Edney, Patricia A. Bisbee, Michael R. Callahan, Sandy Loucks,, Karen D. Pickering, John C. Sager
This work describes the microbiological assessment and materials compatibility of a silver-based biocide as an alternative to iodine for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and future spacecraft potable water systems. In addition to physical and operational anti-microbial counter-measures, the prevention of microbial growth, biofilm formation, and microbiologically induced corrosion in water distribution and storage systems requires maintenance of a biologically-effective, residual biocide concentration in solution and on the wetted surfaces of the system. Because of the potential for biocide depletion in water distribution systems and the development of acquired biocide resistance within microbial populations, even sterile water with residual biocide may, over time, support the growth and/or proliferation of bacteria that pose a risk to crew health and environmental systems.
2006-07-17
Technical Paper
2006-01-2247
Molly Anderson
Selecting the appropriate atmosphere for a spacecraft and mission is a complicated problem. NASA has previously used atmospheres from Earth normal composition and pressure to pure oxygen at low pressures. Future exploration missions will likely strike a compromise somewhere between the two, trying to balance operation impacts on EVA, safety concerns for flammability and health risks, life science and physiology questions, and other issues. Life support systems and internal thermal control systems are areas that will have to respond to changes in the atmospheric composition and pressure away from the Earth-like conditions currently used on the International Space Station. This paper examines life support and internal thermal control technologies currently in use or in development to find what impacts in design, efficiency and performance, or feasibility might be expected.
1992-07-01
Technical Paper
921276
Charles E. Verostko, Marybeth A. Edeen, Nigel J. C. Packham
Long duration manned space missions will require integrated biological and physicochemical processes for recovery of resources from wastes. This paper discusses a hybrid regenerative biological and physicochemical water recovery system designed and built at NASA's Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) at Johnson Space Center (JSC). The system is sized for a four-person crew and consists of a two-stage, aerobic, trickling filter bioreactor; a reverse osmosis system; and a photocatalytic oxidation system. The system was designed to accommodate high organic and inorganic loadings and a low hydraulic loading. The bioreactor was designed to oxidize organics to carbon dioxide and water; the reverse osmosis system reduces inorganic content to potable quality; and the photocatalytic oxidation unit removes residual organic impurities (part per million range) and provides in-situ disinfection. The design and performance of the hybrid system for producing potable/hygiene water is described.
1995-07-01
Technical Paper
951597
Harvey B. Wright, Wendell Elrod
This paper describes the current United States Laboratory (USL) outfitting following the transition from Space Station Freedom to International Space Station (ISS). The ISS USL is outfitted with eleven systems racks, an optical quality nadir window for earth viewing experiments and accommodations for thirteen International Standard Payload Racks (ISPRs). The international payloads utilize this outfitting in a “shirt sleeve” environment by sharing allocated system resources and flight crew time to perform long term microgravity experiments. These systems resources include Command and Data Handling, 120 Vdc power, liquid and air cooling, audio and video communication, space vacuum and location dependent levels of microgravity. The ISS USL outfitting configuration, user interfaces, systems performance and environmental conditions are included in this ICES paper.
1995-07-01
Technical Paper
951648
Joe Chambliss, Gerald Esquivel
Many changes have been approved for implementation into the International Space Station (ISS) design for Thermal Control (TC) since the System Design Review (SDR)conducted in March 1994. Some of the changes have resulted in changes in the basic content of the ISS TC Subsystem (TCS) while others have addressed more efficient ways of developing the system. The design changes were made to address several distinct facets of the program. Foremost was the intent to control costs of the ISS program. The intent to ensure that the ISS is not completely dependent on any one partner was a major reason for other changes. Refinement of the SDR design and identification and solution of problems with the SDR design resulted in other design changes. While the technology to be used for the ISS TC has remained the same during this period, significant changes have been made to the way the ISS thermal control technology is implemented.
1992-08-03
Technical Paper
929300
Greg L. Kimnach, Anastacio N. Baez
Unlike a terrestrial electric utility which can purchase power from a neighboring utility, the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has strictly limited energy resources; as a result, source control, system monitoring, system protection and load management are essential to the safe and efficient operation of the SSF Electric Power System (EPS). These functions are being evaluated in the DC Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) Testbed which NASA LeRC has developed at the Power System Facility (PSF) located in Cleveland, Ohio. The testbed is an ideal platform to develop, integrate, and verify power system monitoring and control algorithms. State Estimation (SE) is a monitoring tool used extensively in terrestrial electric utilities to ensure safe power system operation.
1996-07-01
Technical Paper
961342
Harvey B. Wright, Wendell Elrod
This paper describes the current USL outfitting with design and development changes incorporated during the past year. The International Space Station (ISS) USL is outfitted with eleven systems racks, an optical quality nadir window for earth viewing experiments and accommodations for thirteen International Standard Payload Racks (ISPRs). International payloads utilize this outfitting in a “shirt sleeve” environment by sharing allocated system resources and flight crew time to perform long term microgravity experiments. Recent changes in Command and Data Handling, 120 Vdc power, liquid and air cooling, audio and video communication, space vacuum and microgravity systems resources are included. User interfaces, systems performance and environmental conditions, in addition to the ISS USL outfitting configuration, are also updated in this ICES paper.
1996-07-01
Technical Paper
961512
William Little, Alan Drysdale
Advanced life support systems require computer controls which deliver a high degree of reliability and autonomy and meet life support criteria. Such control systems must allow crewmembers on long-term missions to perform their scientific and engineering duties while minimizing interactions with life support systems. Control systems must be the “brains” of life support systems providing air, water, edible biomass, and recycling services. They must establish and maintain life support components in an optimized manner, providing self-sufficient infrastructures independent of Earth-based resupply. The CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System) Breadboard Project has implemented such a computerized component of a future mission. The Universal Networked Data Acquisition and Control Engine (UNDACE) is the software interface between humans and hardware controlling plant growth experiments.
1994-06-01
Technical Paper
941290
W. Berry, J. Vernikos, K. Gaiser, P. Campbell
For reasons of safety as well as cost, increasingly lengthy space missions at unprecedented distances from Earth in the 21st century will require reductions in consumables and increases in the autonomy of spacecraft life support systems. Advanced life support technologies can increase mission productivity and enhance science yield by achieving reductions in the mass, volume, and power required to support human needs for long periods of time in sterile and hostile environments. Current investment in developing advanced life support systems for orbital research facilities will increase the productivity of these relatively near-term missions, while contributing to the technology base necessary for future human exploration missions.
1993-09-01
Technical Paper
932518
Munro G. Dearing, Harry N. Swenson, Gordon H. Hardy, Richard E. Zelenka
NASA and the U.S. Army have designed, developed, and tested a Computer Aiding for Low-Altitude Helicopter Flight guidance system. This system provides guidance to the pilot for near-terrain covert helicopter operations. The guidance is presented to the pilot through symbology on a helmet mounted display. This system has demonstrated the feasibility of a pilot-centered concept of terrain flight guidance that preserves pilot flexibility and authority. The system was developed using extensive piloted simulation and then implemented in a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter for flight development and evaluation. A close correlation between simulation and actual flight was found; however, in flight overall pilot workload increased and performance decreased. This paper presents a description of the basic system design, simulation, and flight evaluations.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690615
Joseph P. Young, Frank J. On
The process of reducing a physical system to a mathematical representation is a prevalent task mutual to all fields of analysis. Sometimes the system of equations, or mathematical model as commonly known, will be modified on a trial and error basis to make the model respond in some predetermined fashion or react so as to match behavioral data obtained from the actual physical system. This paper presents a survey of activities to produce logically based schemes to generate mathematical models by making use of experimentally derived information. Primary attention is given to modeling of mechanical structures for purposes of dynamic analysis. Emphasis is given to current effort at Goddard and in particular to the recent studies designed to verify the practical effectiveness of a specific modeling scheme. Strengths and weaknesses of the various modeling schemes are discussed.
2008-06-30
Article
Orbital Sciences Corp. and Aerojet recently conducted a test firing of the jettison motor, a key component of the Launch Abort System (LAS) for NASA’s Orion next-generation human spaceflight program. This successful firing marked the first full-scale rocket propulsion test for the Orion program.
2008-07-10
Article
NASA and Alliant Techsystems (ATK) have unveiled a new vertical test stand at ATK’s facility in Promontory, UT, that will be used to test-fire the full-scale abort motor for the launch-abort system of the Orion crew exploration vehicle.
2008-06-30
Article
Data from the tests of core components of a rocket engine from the Apollo era that carried the first Americans to the moon will help NASA build the next-generation engine that will power the new Ares launch vehicles, it says.
2008-06-30
Article
Purdue University engineers are conducting experiments using a hydrogen facility that became operational in 2007 to help NASA create designs to improve the cooling efficiency and performance of the J-2X rocket engine, which will be used for future missions to Mars and the moon.
2008-06-30
Article
NASA’s Johnson Space Center selected Raytheon Technical Services Co. LLC (RTSC) to assist in implementing a new training model for flight controllers and instructors. The contract expands the scope of RTSC’s training support solutions with NASA to front-end training design, giving the company an opportunity to positively influence the way NASA trains flight controllers and instructors for space vehicle knowledge operations.
2008-06-30
Article
NASA’s Kennedy Space Center awarded a contract to Hensel Phelps of Orlando, FL, for the construction of the Ares I mobile launcher for the Constellation Program. Ares I is the rocket that will transport the Orion crew exploration vehicle, its crew, and cargo to low earth orbit.
2008-06-30
Article
NASA awarded Boeing a $265 million contract to produce the Ares I crew launch vehicle’s instrument unit avionics (IUA). Boeing was previously selected as the Ares I upper-stage production contractor. The IUA provides the guidance, navigation, and control hardware for the vehicles, serving as the “brains” behind the rocket’s ascent.
2008-06-30
Article
Ball Aerospace & Technologies has completed the precision coating process of the primary mirror for NASA’s Kepler Mission, a mission that is specifically designed to detect Earth-size and smaller planets near stars within our region of the Milky Way galaxy.
2008-06-30
Article
The Hexagon Loxham Precision Laboratory, a new facility designed for leading-edge ultra precision research, has been opened at Cranfield University in the U.K. Cranfield has strong links with aerospace technology, and the laboratory will aid significant research into the manufacture of mirrors for the NASA James Webb Space Telescope and will also help scientists develop technologies for finding Earth-like planets and forms of life in space.
2011-08-29
Article
NASA selected XCOR Aerospace to provide suborbital flight and payload integration services for research and scientific missions in a program that will offer up to $10 million dollars in contracts to match payload customers with flight vehicle services.
2012-01-24
Article
Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. submitted a mission concept study to NASA for the storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants in space. Ball Aerospace was one of four companies awarded a six-month contract by NASA to develop a mission concept that demonstrates long-duration, in-space storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants.
2012-01-06
Article
Insulating films and tapes supplied by Dunmore Corp. are providing protection from thermal damage and magnetic interference for the electronic systems on board NASA’s Juno probe, which was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Aug. 5.
2012-01-06
Article
NASA selected Airborne Systems North America of Santa Anna, CA; ILC Dover LP of Frederica, DE; and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. of Littleton, CO, to support agency inflatable aerodynamic decelerator research and development, including work on the Space Technology Program's Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) project.
2012-03-26
Article
NASA and General Motors are jointly developing a robotic glove that astronauts and autoworkers can wear to help do their respective jobs better while potentially reducing the risk of repetitive stress injuries.
2012-12-04
Article
Lightweight combustion chamber walls stay cool because hot-burning propellant remains confined to a central cyclone
2009-07-17
Article
NASA selected Orbital Sciences Corp. to design, manufacture, integrate, and test a new low-Earth orbit space science satellite that will study X-ray polarization in space. Under the $40 million contract, Orbital will provide the spacecraft bus and conduct mission operations for the Goddard Space Flight Center’s (GSFC) Gravity and Extreme Magnetism (GEMS) mission.
2009-07-20
Article
NASA awarded a $29.1 million contract to a team led by Raytheon Co. to develop enhancements to the system-wide modeling and simulation capability in the Airspace Concepts Evaluation System (ACES). The plug-and-play models will help NASA, the FAA, and other researchers better understand the tools and concepts needed to support the impacts of NextGen on the National Airspace System.
2009-09-03
Article
NASA awarded Lockheed Martin Integrated Systems Inc. in Houston, TX, a one-year contract extension valued at $33 million to provide integration services for cargo delivery to and from the International Space Station.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 131

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