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Viewing 1 to 30 of 63
2009-11-03
Technical Paper
2009-32-0063
Noritaka Yoshikawa, Koji Yoshida, Tatsuaki Suzuki
DME is alternate fuel for diesel engines, however DME has defects such as small lower calorific value, inferior lubricity and weak fuel penetration. To compensate disadvantages, In-direct injection 2-stroke diesel engine with low pressure fuel injection system was proposed. The fuel injection timing near TDC gave good performance because the heat loss of low temperature oxidation reaction reduced. The brake torque and brake thermal efficiency of 2-stroke IDI diesel engine were lower than those of 4-stroke engine. However, the exhaust gas emissions were very low level because the intake air leaked through the exhaust port and the exhaust gas was diluted.
2009-11-03
Journal Article
2009-32-0070
Akira Iijima, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
This study was conducted to investigate the influence of low-temperature reactions on the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion process. Specifically, an investigation was made of the effect of the residual gas condition on low-temperature reactions, autoignition and the subsequent state of combustion following ignition. Light emission and absorption spectroscopic measurements were made in the combustion chamber in order to investigate low-temperature reactions in detail. In addition, chemical kinetic simulations were performed to validate the experimental results and to analyze the elemental reaction process. The results made clear the formation behavior of the chemical species produced during low-temperature HCCI reactions.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3745
Hiroaki Nomura, Takuya Muto, Sayaka Nishimi, Hideo Shoji, Kazunori Yoshida
In this study, a spectroscopic method was used to measure the combustion characteristics of a test diesel engine when operated on dimethyl ether (DME) under a homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process. A numerical analysis was made of the elementary reactions using Chemkin 4.0 to perform the calculations. The results of the analysis showed that compression ratio changes and the methane additive influenced the autoignition timing in the DME-HCCI combustion process. In the experiments, reducing the compression ratio delayed the time of the peak cylinder pressure until after top dead center, thereby increasing the crankshaft output and thermal efficiency. The addition of methane enabled the DME-HCCI engine to provide crankshaft output equivalent to that seen for diesel engine operation at a low equivalence ratio. This paper discusses these effects in reference to the experimental and calculated results.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3732
Akira Iijima, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
Controlled Autoignition (CAI) combustion processes can be broadly divided between a CAI process that is applied to four-stroke engines and a CAI process that is applied to two-stroke engines. The former process is generally referred to as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion and the later process as Active Thermo-Atmosphere Combustion (ATAC). The region of stable engine operation differs greatly between these two processes, and it is thought that the elucidation of their differences and similarities could provide useful information for expanding the operation region of HCCI combustion. In this research, the same two-stroke engine was operated under both the ATAC and HCCI combustion processes to compare their respective combustion characteristics. The results indicated that the ignition timing was less likely to change in the ATAC process in relation to changes in the fuel octane number than it was in the HCCI combustion process.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0001
Naoya Ito, Akira Iijima, Akira Terashima, Junki Sahara, Takashi Shimada, Masanori Yamada, Tomohiko Asai, Mitsuaki Tanabe, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
Abstract This study investigated the effect of streamer discharge on autoignition and combustion in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine. A continuous streamer discharge was generated in the center of the combustion chamber of a 2-stroke optically accessible engine that allowed visualization of the entire bore area. The experimental results showed that the flame was initiated and grew from the vicinity of the electrode under the application of a streamer discharge. Subsequently, rapid autoignition (HCCI combustion) occurred in the unburned mixture in the end zone, thus indicating that HCCI combustion was accomplished assisted by the streamer discharge. In other word, ignition timing of HCCI combustion was advanced after the streamer discharging process, and the initiation behavior of the combustion flame was made clear under that condition.
2010-09-28
Technical Paper
2010-32-0092
Ryoga Suzuki, Hideo Shoji, Koji Yoshida, Akira Iijima
There are strong demands today to further improve the thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines against a backdrop of various environmental issues, including rising carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and global warming. One factor that impedes efforts to improve the thermal efficiency of spark ignition engines is the occurrence of knocking. The aim of this study was to elucidate the details of knocking based on spectroscopic measurements and visualization of phenomena in the combustion chamber of a test engine that was operated on three primary reference fuels with different octane ratings (0 RON, 30 RON, and 50 RON). The ignition timing was retarded in the experiments to delay the progress of flame propagation, making it easier to capture the behavior of low-temperature oxidation reactions at the time knocking occurred.
2010-09-28
Journal Article
2010-32-0089
Akira Iijima, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
In this study, optical measurements were made of the combustion chamber gas during operation of a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine in order to obtain a better understanding of the ignition and combustion characteristics. The principal issues of HCCI engines are to control the ignition timing and to optimize the combustion state following ignition. Autoignition in HCCI engines is strongly influenced by the complex low-temperature oxidation reaction process, alternatively referred to as the cool flame reaction or negative temperature coefficient (NTC) region. Accordingly, a good understanding of this low-temperature oxidation reaction process is indispensable to ignition timing control. In the experiments, spectroscopic measurement methods were applied to investigate the reaction behavior in the process leading to autoignition.
2010-09-28
Journal Article
2010-32-0098
Kenji Saitou, Akira Iijima, Yasuhiro Otagiri, Koji Yoshida, Yusuke Takahashi, Hideo Shoji
The Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine is positioned as a next-generation internal combustion engine and has been the focus of extensive research in recent years to develop a practical system. One reason is that this new combustion system achieves lower fuel consumption and simultaneous reductions of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, which are major issues of internal combustion engines today. However, the characteristics of HCCI combustion can prevent suitable engine operation owing to the rapid combustion process that occurs accompanied by a steep pressure rise when the amount of fuel injected is increased to obtain higher power output. A major issue of HCCI is to control this rapid combustion so that the quantity of fuel injected can be increased for greater power. Controlling the ignition timing is also an issue because it is substantially influenced by the chemical reactions of the fuel.
2012-10-23
Journal Article
2012-32-0001
Ryo Sasaki, Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji, Koji Yoshida
This study clarified the influence of hot gas jet on combustion enhancement effect for lean mixture in the plasma jet ignition. The hot gas jet was generated by the high temperature plasma and was ejected from igniter after plasma jet finished issuing. In combustion tests, propane-air mixture at equivalence ratio of 0.6 was used and the mixture was filled in the combustion chamber at atmosphere pressure and room temperature. For generation of the hot gas jet, the standard air was filled in chamber at same conditions and the hot gas jet was visualized by schlieren method in the absence of combustion. The combustion development processes were also visualized and the combustion pressure was measured. The discharge voltage, discharge current and the plasma luminescence were also measured. The plasma luminescence disappeared within 0.05 ms for any experimental conditions. When cavity depth was deep and orifice diameter was small, the maximum plasma luminescence height was short.
2012-10-23
Technical Paper
2012-32-0080
Mitsuo Asanuma, Akira Iijima, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji, Go Emori
The growing severity of global environmental issues in recent years, including air pollution and the depletion of fossil fuels, has made it necessary for internal combustion engines to achieve higher efficiency and lower exhaust emission levels. Calls for reducing atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO₂) necessitate thoroughgoing measures to lower the levels of CO₂ originating in the combustion process of internal combustion engines and to facilitate operation on diverse energy sources. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion has attracted widespread interest because it achieves high efficiency and can reduce particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions simultaneously. These characteristics are obtainable because HCCI combustion can take place at ultra-lean conditions exceeding the limits of flame propagation.
2012-10-23
Technical Paper
2012-32-0079
Akira Iijima, Tomoya Tojo, Akira Terashima, Kenta Suyama, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
This study examined Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion characteristics in detail on the basis of in-cylinder combustion visualization, spectroscopic measurements of light emission and absorption and chemical kinetic simulations. Special attention was focused on investigating and comparing the effects of the fuel octane number and residual gas on combustion characteristics. The results made clear the relationship between the production/consumption of formaldehyde (HCHO) in the HCCI autoignition process and flame development behavior in the cylinder. Additionally, it was found that both the fuel octane number and residual gas have the effect of moderating low-temperature oxidation reactions. Furthermore, it was observed that residual gas has the effect of shifting the temperature for the occurrence of the hot flame to a higher temperature range.
2012-10-23
Journal Article
2012-32-0075
Yoshihiro Ishikawa, Akira Iijima, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
This study focused on the use of a two-component fuel blend and supercharging as possible means of overcoming these issues of HCCI combustion. Low-carbon gaseous fuels with clean emissions were used as the test fuels. The specific fuels used were dimethyl ether (DME, cetane number of 55 or higher) that autoignites easily And exhibits pronounced low-temperature oxidation reactions, methane (cetane number of 0) that does not autoignite readily and is the main component of natural gas which is regarded as petroleum substitute, and propane (cetane number of 5) that is a principal component of liquefied petroleum gas. The results of previous investigations have shown that the use of a blended fuel of DME and methane produces a two-stage main combustion process under certain operating conditions, with the result that combustion is moderated.
2012-10-23
Technical Paper
2012-32-0078
Tomoya Tojo, Koji Yoshida, Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji, Akira Terashima, Kenta Suyama
Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion experiments were conducted in this study using a single-cylinder test engine fitted with a sapphire observation window to facilitate visualization of the entire cylinder bore area. In addition to in-cylinder visualization of combustion, spectroscopic measurements were made of light emission and absorption in the combustion chamber to investigate autoignition behavior in detail. Engine firing experiments were conducted to visualize HCCI combustion over a wide range of compression ratios from 12:1 to 22:1. The results showed that increasing the compression ratio advanced the ignition timing and increased the maximum pressure rise rate, making it necessary to moderate combustion. It was also found that autoignition can be induced even in a mixture lean enough to cause misfiring by raising the intake air temperature so as to advance the overall combustion process.
1997-10-27
Technical Paper
978496
Daiji Kotani, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji, Atsushi Saima
We have investigated combustion characteristics of lean gasoline-air pre-mixture ignited by gas-oil injection using a high compression D.I. diesel engine. Gasoline was supplied as an uniform lean mixture by using carburetors, and gas-oil was directly injected into the cylinder. Two different types of combustion chamber were attempted. It was confirmed that the lean mixture of air-fuel ratio between 150 and 35 could be ignited and burned by this ignition method. An engine with the re-entrant type combustion chamber had an advantage for combustion and ignition. The brake mean effective pressure increased when relatively rich mixture was provided with a small amount of the gas-oil injection. As the gas-oil injection increased, HC concentration decreased, and NO and CO concentration increased. The exhaust gas emission of pollutants could be reduced when lean mixture was ignited by an optimum gas-oil injection.
1997-10-27
Technical Paper
978515
Yasunori Amino, Shunsuke Hashimoto, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji, Atsushi Saima
The aim of this research was to investigate the mechanism causing autoignition and the effect of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on combustion by detecting the behavior of the OH radical and other excited molecules present in the flame in a spark ignition engine. The test equipment used was a 2-cycle engine equipped with a Schnürle scavenging system. Using emission spectroscopy, the behavior of the OH radical was measured at four locations in the end zone of the combustion chamber. The OH radical plays an important role in the elemental reactions of hydrocarbon fuels. When a certain level of EGR was applied according to the engine operating conditions, the unburned gas became active owing to heat transfer from residual gas near the measurement positions on the exhaust port side and the influence of excited species in the residual gas, and autoignition tended to occur.
1997-10-27
Technical Paper
978516
Toshiyuki Matsushima, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji, Atsushi Saima
The use of a higher compression ratio is desirable for improving the thermal efficiency and specific power of spark-ignition engines, but it gives rise to a problem of engine knock. In the present research, an investigation was made of the role of the preflame reaction region of a spark-ignition engine in the occurrence of autoignition. Emission spectroscopy was used to measure the behavior of formaldehyde (HCHO) in a cool flame. In addition, measure the behavior of the faint light attributed to the HCO radical in a blue flame with the concurrent measurement of the OH radical. The emission waveforms measurements obtained for HCHO when n-heptane (ORON) was used as the fuel, It is thought that these tendencies correspond to the passage and degeneracy of a cool flame. Further, the emission waveforms measured for the HCO radical when blended fuels (6ORON, 8ORON) were correspond to that of a blue flame.
1998-10-19
Technical Paper
982482
Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji, Hidenori Tanaka
The uniform lean gasoline-air mixture was provided to diesel engine and was ignited by direct diesel fuel injection. The mixing region that is formed by diesel fuel penetration and entrainment of ambient mixture is regarded as combustible turbulent jet. The ignition occurs in this region and the ambient lean mixture is burned by flame propagation. The lean mixture of air-fuel ratio between 150 and 35 could be ignited and burned by this ignition method. An increase of diesel fuel injection is effective to ensure combustion and ignition. As diesel fuel injection increases, HC concentration decreases, and NOx and CO concentration increases.
1998-10-19
Technical Paper
982481
Hideo Shoji, Yasunori Amino, Shunsuke Hashimoto, Koji Yoshida, Atsushi Saima
This research focused on the light emission behavior of the OH radical (characteristic spectrum of 306.4 nm) that plays a key role in combustion reactions, in order to investigate the influence of the residual gas on autoignition. The test engine used was a 2-stroke, air-cooled engine fitted with an exhaust pressure control valve in the exhaust manifold. When a certain level of internal EGR is forcibly applied, the temperature of the unburned end gas is raised on account of heat transfer from the hot residual gas and also due to compression by piston motion. As a result, the unburned end gas becomes active and autoignition tends to occur.
1998-10-19
Technical Paper
982564
Kazuhide Tanaka, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji, Hidenori Tanaka
In plasma jet ignition, combustion enhancement effects are caused toward the plasma jet issuing direction. Therefore, when the igniter is attached at the center of cylindrically shaped combustion chamber, the plasma jet should issues toward the round combustion chamber wall. The plasma jet igniter that had a concentric circular orifice has been developed. It is expected that the plasma jet is issued and is diffused from concentric circular orifice toward the combustion chamber wall. Relationship between plasma jet and igniter configuration was experimentally clarified. Plasma jet can issue from the entire concentric circular orifice for some igniter. Plasma jet is extended with increasing concentric circular orifice area. Plasma jet penetration increases with increasing concentric circular orifice width.
2005-10-12
Technical Paper
2005-32-0002
Keisuke HAMADA, Shun NIIJIMA, Kazunori YOSHIDA, Koji YOSHIDA, Hideo SHOJI, Kazuto SHIMADA, Kenji SHIBANO
Attention has recently been focused on homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion (HCCI) as an effective combustion process for resolving the essential nature of combustion. Meanwhile, dimethylether (DME) has attracted interest as a potential alternative fuel for compression ignition engines. Authors measured the combustion process of DME HCCI by using a spectroscopic method. A diesel engine was used as the test engine. The results of these analyses showed that changes in the compression ratio, intake air temperature and equivalence ratio influenced the ignition timing in the HCCI combustion process. This paper discusses these effects in reference to the experimental and calculated results.
2005-10-12
Technical Paper
2005-32-0075
Koji YOSHIDA, Hideo SHOJI
The new fuel injection method which is using the high-voltage electrical discharge has been proposed. The plasma jet ignition technology is applied to this injection system, and the component parts of fuel injector are similar to the plasma jet igniter. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the spray characteristics and the fuel injection development processes of this injection method. To obtain the influence of injector configuration and supplied electrical discharge energy on the fuel spray, the fuel is ejected into the open atmosphere and fuel injection development process is visualized by the schlieren method. The penetration depth, maximum width and projected area of fuel spay increase with increasing in the electrical discharge energy and an orifice diameter. In the case at which the large electrical discharge energy is provided, the fuel injection is finished within a short duration and the mean fuel spray velocity becomes fast.
2005-10-12
Technical Paper
2005-32-0074
Yuuji KOGUCHI, Koji YOSHIDA, Hideo SHOJI
The purpose of this study is to elucidate the development process of hot kernel generated by the laser induced breakdown and to clarify the relationship between corona discharge application and flame propagation. The mixture can be ignited by the laser induced breakdown. Nd:YAG laser is used for the ignition and laser light is optically focused on the central part of combustion chamber by a plano convex lens. The hot kernel is observed in the absence of combustion and is rapidly developed into the laser incidence side. The homogeneous propane-air mixture is used and six equivalence ratios between 0.7 and 1.5 are tested. For generating the positive corona discharge in the combustion chamber, a non-uniform electric field is applied by the needle to plane gap. In a lean mixture, the whole flame front shifts to downward from the breakdown point and, in the rich mixture region, the combustion is strongly enhanced.
2006-11-13
Technical Paper
2006-32-0043
Akira Iijima, Takashi Watanabe, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
In this study, it was shown that Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion in a 4-stroke engine, operating under the conditions of a high compression ratio, wide open throttle (WOT) and a lean mixture, could be simulated by raising the compression ratio of a 2-stroke engine. On that basis, a comparison was then made with the characteristics of Active Thermo-Atmosphere Combustion (ATAC), the HCCI process that is usually accomplished in 2-stroke engines under the conditions of a low compression ratio, partial throttle and a large quantity of residual gas. One major difference observed between HCCI combustion and ATAC was their different degrees of susceptibility to the occurrence of cool flames, which was attributed to differences in the residual gas state. It was revealed that the ignition characteristics of these two combustion processes differed greatly in relation to the fuel octane number.
2004-09-27
Technical Paper
2004-32-0097
Kentaro Goto, Akira Iijima, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion has attracted considerable interest in recent years as a new combustion concept for internal combustion engines. On the other hand, two combustion concepts proposed for two-cycle spark-ignition (SI) engines are Active Thermo-Atmosphere Combustion (ATAC) and Activated Radical (AR) combustion. The authors undertook this study to examine the similarities and differences between HCCI combustion and ATAC (AR) combustion. Differences in the low-temperature oxidation reaction behavior between these two combustion processes were made clear using one test engine.
2003-09-16
Technical Paper
2003-32-0006
Takahiro Koseki, Shinichi Tamura, Hideaki Kashiwagi, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji, Kazuto Shimada, Kenji Shibano
Attention has recently been focused on homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) as an effective combustion process for resolving issues inherent to the nature of combustion. Dimethyl ether (DME; CH3OCH3) has attracted interest as a potential alternative fuel for compression ignition engines. We measured the HCCI process of DME in a test diesel engine by using a spectroscopic method. Simultaneous measurements were also done on exhaust emissions of hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Based on the experimental data, this paper discusses the relationship between the equivalence ratio and the observed tendencies.
2003-09-16
Technical Paper
2003-32-0038
Tsuyoshi Suzuki, Hironori Ohara, Akihiro Kakishima, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
This study attempted to elucidate combustion conditions in a progression from normal combustion to knocking by analyzing the ion current and light emission intensity that occurred during this transition. With the aim of understanding the combustion states involved, the ion current was measured at two positions in the combustion chamber. Light emission spectroscopy was applied to examine preflame reactions that are observed prior to autoignition in the combustion process of hydrocarbon fuels. The results obtained by analyzing the experimental data made clear the relationship between the ion current and light emission during the transition from normal combustion to knocking operation.
2008-09-09
Technical Paper
2008-32-0056
Nozomi Katagiri, Yoshitaka Marumo, Hitoshi Tsunashima
This study seeks to design a lane-keeping controller for motorcycles and to evaluate it by simple computer simulation with a rider-control model. We applied the optimal control theory to the lane-keeping controller. The control effect is evaluated by using the rider-control model. By examining the computer simulation with the rider-in-the-loop system consisting of the motorcycle, the controller, and the rider-control model, good lane-following performance is achieved without interference between the control input and the rider's input. Additionally, the lane-following performance is improved by using a virtual-point regulator.
2008-10-06
Technical Paper
2008-01-2403
Yusuke Watanabe, Koji Morikawa, Takuo Kuwahara, Mitsuaki Tanabe
We had improved RCM and developed a Super Rapid Compression Machine (SRCM) that realizes an extremely rapid compression compared with the conventional RCM. In this study, the performance of the developed SRCM was evaluated. The SRCM was used to investigate on the effects of equivalence ratio on HCCI of n-heptane and iso-octane fuel/air mixture. Experimental results for ignition delay time, τ, and combustion time, t, were obtained from the cylinder pressure histories. The HCCI at high engine speeds was clarified by Optical observation using a high speed camera. As a result, the ignition delay time and combustion time are found to saturate above equivalence ratio of 0.6 at constant compression ratio. In the HCCI combustion in high compression ratio case, shock wave occurs from the core region of the roll-up vortex cause by piston motion. The HCCI combustion has many peaks over a wide range of frequency.
2007-07-23
Technical Paper
2007-01-1886
Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji
The principal issues of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion that must be addressed include ignition timing control and expansion of the stable operation region. Detailed analyses of ignition and combustion mechanisms must be undertaken to resolve these issues. In this study, spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the effects of the fuel octane number and residual gas state on ignition and combustion characteristics. Spectroscopic measurements were made of light emission intensity and of absorbance at a wavelength corresponding to HCHO (formaldehyde) which plays an important role in the low-temperature reaction (i.e. cool flame). The results revealed that varying the fuel octane number and the residual gas state changed the cool flame magnitude and the duration of the low-temperature reaction period, which substantially altered the ignition characteristics of HCCI combustion.
2015-11-17
Technical Paper
2015-32-0807
Takashi Shimada, Yuki Yoshida, Chibin Rin, Masanori Yamada, Naoya Ito, Akira Iijima, Koji Yoshida, Hideo Shoji
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines have attracted much attention and are being widely researched as engines characterized by low emissions and high efficiency. However, one issue of HCCI engines is their limited operating range because of the occurrence of rapid combustion at high loads and misfiring at low loads. It is known that knocking accompanied by in-cylinder pressure oscillations also occurs in HCCI engines at high loads, similar to knocking seen in spark-ignition engines. In this study, HCCI combustion accompanied by in-cylinder pressure oscillations was visualized by taking high-speed photographs of the entire bore area. In addition, the influence of internal exhaust gas circulation (EGR) on HCCI knocking was also investigated. The visualized combustion images revealed that rapid autoignition occurred in the end-gas region during the latter half of the HCCI combustion process when accompanied by in-cylinder pressure oscillations.
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