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Viewing 1 to 30 of 278
2010-10-25
Journal Article
2010-01-2172
James P. Szybist, Eric Nafziger, Adam Weall
A spark-assist homogeneous charge compression ignition (SA-HCCI) operating strategy is presented here that allows for stoichiometric combustion from 1000-3000 rpm, and at loads as high as 750 kPa net IMEP. A single cylinder gasoline engine equipped with direct fuel injection and fully variable hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) is used for this experimental study. The HVA system enables negative valve overlap (NVO) valve timing for hot internal EGR. Spark-assist stabilizes combustion over a wide range of engine speeds and loads, and allows for stoichiometric operation at all conditions. Characteristics of both spark-ignited combustion and HCCI are present during the SA-HCCI operating mode, with combustion analysis showing a distinctive spark ignited phase of combustion, followed by a much more rapid HCCI combustion phase. At high load, the maximum cylinder pressure rise rate is controlled by a combination of spark timing and retarding the intake valve closing angle.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2205
Thomas Edward Briggs, Robert Wagner, K. Dean Edwards, Scott Curran, Eric Nafziger
In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 45%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2206
Scott Curran, Vitaly Prikhodko, Kukwon Cho, C. Scott Sluder, James Parks, Robert Wagner, Sage Kokjohn, Rolf D. Reitz
In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline with diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 5.5 bar net mean effective pressure (NMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2209
K. Dean Edwards, Robert Wagner, Thomas Briggs
Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment.
2010-10-25
Journal Article
2010-01-2091
Michael J. Lance, C. Scott Sluder, Samuel Lewis, John Storey
Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler fouling has become a significant issue for compliance with nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions standards. In order to better understand fouling mechanisms, eleven field-aged EGR coolers provided by seven different engine manufacturers were characterized using a suite of techniques. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy following mounting the samples in epoxy and polishing. Optical microscopy was able to discern the location of hydrocarbons in the polished cross-sections. Chemical compositions were measured using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Mass per unit area along the length of the coolers was also measured.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2127
Andrea Strzelec, Todd Toops, Charles Daw, David E. Foster, Christopher Rutland
Diesel particulate samples were collected from a light duty engine operated at a single speed-load point with a range of biodiesel and conventional fuel blends. The oxidation reactivity of the samples was characterized in a laboratory reactor, and BET surface area measurements were made at several points during oxidation of the fixed carbon component of both types of particulate. The fixed carbon component of biodiesel particulate has a significantly higher surface area for the initial stages of oxidation, but the surface areas for the two particulates become similar as fixed carbon oxidation proceeds beyond 40%. When fixed carbon oxidation rates are normalized to total surface area, it is possible to describe the oxidation rates of the fixed carbon portion of both types of particulates with a single set of Arrhenius parameters. The measured surface area evolution during particle oxidation was found to be inconsistent with shrinking sphere oxidation.
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2126
Alexander Sappok, Leslie Bromberg, James E. Parks, Vitaly Prikhodko
Accurate knowledge of diesel particulate filter (DPF) particulate matter (PM) loading is critical for robust and efficient operation of the combined engine-exhaust aftertreatment system. Furthermore, upcoming on-board diagnostics regulations require on-board technologies to evaluate the status of the DPF. This work describes the application of radio frequency (RF) - based sensing techniques to accurately measure DPF particulate matter levels. A 1.9L GM turbo diesel engine and a DPF with an RF-sensor were studied. Direct comparisons between the RF measurement and conventional pressure-based methods were made. Further analysis of the particulate matter loading rates was obtained with a mass-based total PM emission measurement instrument (TEOM) and DPF gravimetric measurements.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0344
Gilsu Choi, Zhuxian Xu, Ming Li, Shiv Gupta, Thomas Jahns, Fred Wang, Neil A. Duffie, Laura Marlino
This paper introduces a promising approach for developing an integrated traction motor drive based on the Integrated Modular Motor Drive (IMMD) concept. The IMMD concept strives to meet aggressive power density and performance targets by modularizing both the machine and power electronics and then integrating them into a single combined machine-plus-drive structure. Physical integration of the power electronics inside the machine makes it highly desirable to increase the power electronics operating temperature including higher power semiconductor junction temperatures and improved device packaging. Recent progress towards implementing the IMMD concept in an integrated traction motor drive is summarized in this paper. Several candidate permanent magnet (PM) machine configurations with different numbers of phases between 3 and 6 are analyzed to compare their performance characteristics and key application features.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0346
Gui-Jia Su, Lixin Tang
The voltage source inverter (VSI) possesses several drawbacks that make it difficult to meet the requirements of automotive applications for inverter volume, lifetime, and cost. The VSI requires a very high performance dc bus capacitor that is costly and bulky. Other characteristics of the VSI not only negatively impact its own reliability but also that of the motor as well as motor efficiency. These problems could be eliminated or significantly mitigated by the use of the current source inverter (CSI). The CSI doesn't require any dc bus capacitors but uses three small ac filter capacitors and an inductor as the energy storage component, thus avoiding many of the drawbacks of the VSI. The CSI offers several inherent advantages that could translate into a substantial reduction in inverter cost and volume, increased reliability, a much higher constant-power speed range, and improved motor efficiency and lifetime.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-1087
Mark Havstad, Salvador M. Aceves, Matthew McNenly, William Piggott, K. Dean Edwards, Robert Wagner, C. Stuart Daw, Charles E. A. Finney
We describe a CHEMKIN-based multi-zone model that simulates the expected combustion variations in a single-cylinder engine fueled with iso-octane as the engine transitions from spark-ignited (SI) combustion to homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. The model includes a 63-species reaction mechanism and mass and energy balances for the cylinder and the exhaust flow. For this study we assumed that the SI-to-HCCI transition is implemented by means of increasing the internal exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) at constant engine speed. This transition scenario is consistent with that implemented in previously reported experimental measurements on an experimental engine equipped with variable valve actuation. We find that the model captures many of the important experimental trends, including stable SI combustion at low EGR (~0.10), a transition to highly unstable combustion at intermediate EGR, and finally stable HCCI combustion at very high EGR (~0.75).
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0619
James Szybist, Matthew Foster, Wayne R. Moore, Keith Confer, Adam Youngquist, Robert Wagner
Ethanol offers significant potential for increasing the compression ratio of SI engines resulting from its high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. A study was conducted to determine the knock-limited compression ratio of ethanol-gasoline blends to identify the potential for improved operating efficiency. To operate an SI engine in a flex fuel vehicle requires operating strategies that allow operation on a broad range of fuels from gasoline to E85. Since gasoline or low ethanol blend operation is inherently limited by knock at high loads, strategies must be identified which allow operation on these fuels with minimal fuel economy or power density tradeoffs. A single-cylinder direct-injection spark-ignited engine with fully variable hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) is operated at WOT and other high-load conditions to determine the knock-limited compression ratio (CR) of ethanol fuel blends. The geometric CR is varied by changing pistons, producing CR from 9.2 to 12.87.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0618
Zhenhong Lin, David Greene
To make informed decisions about travel and vehicle purchase, consumers need unbiased and accurate information of the fuel economy they will actually obtain. In the past, the EPA fuel economy estimates based on its 1984 rules have been widely criticized for overestimating on-road fuel economy. In 2008, EPA adopted a new estimation rule. This study compares the usefulness of the EPA's 1984 and 2008 estimates based on their prediction bias and accuracy and attempts to improve the prediction of on-road fuel economies based on consumer and vehicle attributes. We examine the usefulness of the EPA fuel economy estimates using a large sample of self-reported on-road fuel economy data and develop an Individualized Model for more accurately predicting an individual driver's on-road fuel economy based on easily determined vehicle and driver attributes. Accuracy rather than bias appears to have limited the usefulness of the EPA 1984 estimates in predicting on-road MPG.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0475
Teresa J. Franklin, Jwo Pan, Michael Santella, Tsung-Yu Pan
Fatigue behavior of dissimilar ultrasonic spot welds in lap-shear specimens of magnesium AZ31B-H24 and hot-dipped-galvanized mild steel sheets is investigated based on experimental observations, closed-form stress intensity factor solutions, and a fatigue life estimation model. Fatigue tests were conducted under different load ranges with two load ratios of 0.1 and 0.2. Optical micrographs of the welds after the tests were examined to understand the failure modes of the welds. The micrographs show that the welds mainly fail from kinked fatigue cracks growing through the magnesium sheets. The optical micrographs also indicate that failure mode changes from the partial nugget pullout mode under low-cycle loading conditions to the transverse crack growth mode under high-cycle loading conditions. The closed-form stress intensity factor solutions at the critical locations of the welds are used to explain the locations of fatigue crack initiation and growth.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-1266
David Smith, Henning Lohse-Busch, David Irick
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technologies have the potential for considerable petroleum consumption reductions, possibly at the expense of increased tailpipe emissions due to multiple “cold” start events and improper use of the engine for PHEV specific operation. PHEVs operate predominantly as electric vehicles (EVs) with intermittent assist from the engine during high power demands. As a consequence, the engine can be subjected to multiple cold start events. These cold start events may have a significant impact on the tailpipe emissions due to degraded catalyst performance and starting the engine under less than ideal conditions. On current hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), the first cold start of the engine dictates whether or not the vehicle will pass federal emissions tests. PHEV operation compounds this problem due to infrequent, multiple engine cold starts.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0852
Xian Zhang, Pierluigi Pisu, Todd J. Toops
Of the fuel cells being studied, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is viewed as the most promising for transportation. Yet until today, the commercialization of the PEMFC has not been widespread in spite of its large expectation. Poor long term performances or durability, and high production and maintenance costs account for the main reasons. For the final commercialization of fuel cell in transportation field, the durability issue must be addressed, while the costs should be further brought down. In the meantime, health-monitoring and prognosis techniques are of great significance in ensuring the normal operation of the fuel cell and preventing or predicting its likely abrupt and catastrophic failure. In this paper, an analytical formulation of a damage accumulation law for fuel cell is presented.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0882
Zhiming Gao, Kalyana Chakravarthy, Charles Daw, James Conklin
A transient, one-dimensional lean NOx trap (LNT) model is described and implemented for vehicle systems simulations. The model accounts for conservation of chemical species and thermal energy, and includes the effects of O₂ storage and NOx storage (in the form of nitrites and nitrates). Nitrites and nitrates are formed by diffusion of NO and NO₂, respectively, into sorbent particles, and reaction rates are controlled by chemical kinetics and solid-phase diffusion. The model also accounts for thermal aging and sulfation by means of empirical correlations, which have been derived from laboratory experiments. Example simulation results using the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) are presented.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-0888
James P. Szybist, Brian H. West
Ethanol is a very attractive fuel from an end-use perspective because it has a high chemical octane number and a high latent heat of vaporization. When an engine is optimized to take advantage of these fuel properties, both efficiency and power can be increased through higher compression ratio, direct fuel injection, higher levels of boost, and a reduced need for enrichment to mitigate knock or protect the engine and aftertreatment system from overheating. The ASTM D5798 specification for high level ethanol blends, commonly called “E85,” underwent a major revision in 2011. The minimum ethanol content was revised downward from 68 vol% to 51 vol%, which combined with the use of low octane blending streams such as natural gasoline introduces the possibility of a lower octane “E85” fuel.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1023
Seung Hoon Hong, Katherine Avery, Jwo Pan, Michael Santella, Zhili Feng, Tsung-Yu Pan
Failure mode and fatigue behavior of friction stir spot welds made with convex and concave tools in lap-shear specimens of dissimilar high strength dual phase steel (DP780GA) and hot stamped boron steel (HSBS) sheets are investigated based on experiments and a kinked fatigue crack growth model. Lap-shear specimens with the welds were tested under both quasistatic and cyclic loading conditions. Optical micrographs indicate that under both quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions, the welds mainly fail from cracks growing through the upper DP780GA sheets where the tools were plunged in during the welding processes. Based on the observed failure mode, a kinked fatigue crack growth model is adopted to estimate fatigue lives of the welds. In the kinked crack fatigue crack growth model, the stress intensity factor solutions for fatigue life estimations are based on the closed-form solutions for idealized spot welds in lap-shear specimens.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1020
Wei-Jen Lai, Jwo Pan, Zhili Feng, Michael Santella, Tsung-Yu Pan
Failure modes and fatigue behaviors of ultrasonic spot welds in lap-shear specimens of magnesium AZ31B-H24 and hot-dipped-galvanized mild steel sheets with and without adhesive are investigated. Ultrasonic spot welded, adhesive-bonded, and weld-bonded lap-shear specimens were made. These lap-shear specimens were tested under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions. The ultrasonic spot weld appears not to provide extra strength to the weld-bonded lap-shear specimen under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions. The quasi-static and fatigue strengths of adhesive-bonded and weld-bonded lap-shear specimens appear to be the same. For the ultrasonic spot welded lap-shear specimens, the optical micrographs indicate that failure mode changes from the partial nugget pullout mode under quasi-static and low-cycle loading conditions to the kinked crack growth mode under high-cycle loading conditions.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1017
Tsung-Yu Pan, Zhili Feng, Michael Santella, Jian Chen
Development of reliable magnesium (Mg) to steel joining methods is one of the critical issues in broader applications of Mg in automotive body construction. Ultrasonic spot welding (USW) has been demonstrated successfully to join Mg to steel and to achieve strong joints. In this study, corrosion test of ultrasonic spot welds between 1.6 mm thick Mg AZ31B-H24 and 0.8 mm thick galvanized mild steel, without and with adhesive, was conducted. Adhesive used was a one-component, heat-cured epoxy material, and was applied between overlapped sheets before USW. Corrosion test was conducted with an automotive cyclic corrosion test, which includes cyclic exposures of dipping in the 0.5% sodium chloride (NaCl) bath, a constant humidity environment, and a drying period. Lap shear strength of the joints decreased with the cycles of corrosion exposure. Good joint strengths were retained at the end of 30-cycle test.
2014-01-15
Journal Article
2013-01-9092
Matthew Langholtz, Mark Downing, Robin Graham, Fred Baker, Alicia Compere, William Griffith, Raymond Boeman, Martin Keller
Lignin by-products from biorefineries has the potential to provide a low-cost alternative to petroleum-based precursors to manufacture carbon fiber, which can be combined with a binding matrix to produce a structural material with much greater specific strength and specific stiffness than conventional materials such as steel and aluminum. The market for carbon fiber is universally projected to grow exponentially to fill the needs of clean energy technologies such as wind turbines and to improve the fuel economies in vehicles through lightweighting. In addition to cellulosic biofuel production, lignin-based carbon fiber production coupled with biorefineries may provide $2,400 to $3,600 added value dry Mg−1 of biomass for vehicle applications. Compared to producing ethanol alone, the addition of lignin-derived carbon fiber could increase biorefinery gross revenue by 30% to 300%.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0573
Sujit Das
The affordability of today's and future advanced technology vehicles (i.e., diesel, hybrid, and fuel cell) developed for improved fuel economy remains a concern with respect to final consumer acceptance. The automotive system cost model (ASCM) developed for the production cost estimates at a level of five major subsystems and 35+ components, has been used here to address the affordability issue of advanced technology vehicles. Scenarios encompassing five alternative powertrain and three body options for a mid-size vehicle under two different timeframes (i.e., 2002 and 2010) were considered to determine the cost-effectiveness of among the competing technology options within the same timeframe and between the two timeframes.
2004-10-25
Technical Paper
2004-01-3023
Brian West, Shean Huff, James Parks, Sam Lewis, Jae-Soon Choi, William Partridge, John Storey
Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts are capable of reducing NOx in lean exhaust from diesel engines. NOx is stored on the catalyst during lean operation; then, under rich exhaust conditions, the NOx is released from and reduced by the catalyst. The process of NOx release and reduction is called regeneration. One method of obtaining the rich conditions for regeneration is to inject additional fuel into the engine cylinders while throttling the engine intake air flow to effectively run the engine at rich air:fuel ratios; this method is called “in-cylinder” regeneration. In-cylinder regeneration of LNT catalysts has been demonstrated and is a candidate emission control technique for commercialization of light-duty diesel vehicles to meet future emission regulations. In the study presented here, a 1.7-liter diesel engine with a LNT catalyst system was used to evaluate in-cylinder regeneration techniques.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-0617
Jan-Mou Li, Zhiming Gao
It is rare for an attempt towards optimization at the fleet-level when consideration is given to the sheer number of seemingly unpredictable interactions among vehicles and infrastructure in congested urban areas. To close the gap, we introduce a simulation based framework to explore the impact of speed synchronization on fuel economy improvement for fleets in traffic. The framework consists of traffic and vehicle modules. The traffic module is used to simulate driver behavior in urban traffic; and the vehicle module is employed to estimate fuel economy. Driving schedule is the linkage between these two modules. To explore the impact, a connected vehicle technology sharing vehicle speed information is used for better fuel economy of a fleet including six vehicles. In all scenarios analyzed, the leading vehicle operates under the EPA Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS), while the other five vehicles follow the leader consecutively.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1218
Paul Chambon, Shean Huff, Kevin Norman, K. Dean Edwards, John Thomas, Vitaly Prikhodko
Lean Gasoline Direct Injection (LGDI) combustion is a promising technical path for achieving significant improvements in fuel efficiency while meeting future emissions requirements. Though Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct Injection (SGDI) technology is commercially available in a few vehicles on the American market, LGDI vehicles are not, but can be found in Europe. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) obtained a European BMW 1-series fitted with a 2.01 LGDI engine. The vehicle was instrumented and commissioned on a chassis dynamometer. The engine and after-treatment performance and emissions were characterized over US drive cycles (Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET), and US06 Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06)) and steady state mappings. The vehicle micro hybrid features (engine stop-start and intelligent alternator) were benchmarked as well during the course of that study.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1330
Chaitanya Narula, Xiaofan Yang, Peter Bonnesen, Edward Hagaman
The leading approach for reduction of NOx from diesel engines is selective catalytic reduction employing urea as a reductant (NH₃- or urea-SCR). For passenger vehicles, the best known NH₃-SCR catalysts are Cu-ZSM-5 and Fe-ZSM-5 and have been shown to function very well in a narrow temperature range. This technology is not directly transferable to off-road diesel engines which operate under a different duty cycle resulting in exhaust with different fractions of components than are present in passenger vehicle emissions. Our results show that Cu-ZSM-5 exhibits 90% NOx reduction efficiency in 250-450°C range while Fe-ZSM-5 is highly effective in 350-550°C range for off-road engines. However, a combination of these catalysts cannot efficiently reduce NOx in 150-650°C which is the desirable range for deployment in off-road diesel engines. In our efforts to increase the effective range of these catalysts, we initiated efforts to modify these catalysts by catalyst promoters.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0036
Dimitry Sediako, Francesco D'Elia, Anthony Lombardi, Alan Machin, C. (Ravi) Ravindran, Camden Hubbard, Robert Mackay
Continuous efforts to develop a lightweight alloy suitable for the most demanding applications in automotive industry resulted in a number of advanced aluminum (Al) and magnesium alloys and manufacturing routes. One example of this is the application of 319 Al alloy for production of 3.6L V6 gasoline engine blocks. Aluminum is sand cast around Fe-liner cylinder inserts, prior to undergoing the T7 heat treatment process. One of the critical factors determining the quality of the final product is the type, level, and profile of residual stresses along the Fe liners (or extent of liner distortion) that are always present in a cast component. In this study, neutron diffraction was used to characterize residual stresses along the Al and the Fe liners in the web region of the cast engine block. The strains were measured both in Al and Fe in hoop, radial, and axial orientations. The stresses were subsequently determined using generalized Hooke's law.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0033
Alan Druschitz, Ricardo Aristizabal, Edward Druschitz, Camden Hubbard, Thomas Watkins
Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool that can be used to identify the phases present and to measure the spacing of the atomic planes in a material. Thus, the residual stresses can be determined within a component and/or the phases present. New intercritically austempered irons rely on the unique properties of the austenite phase present in their microstructures. If these materials are to see widespread use, methods to verify the quality (behavior consistency) of these materials and to provide guidance for further optimization will be needed. Neutron diffraction studies were performed at the second generation neutron residual stress facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a variety of intercritically austempered irons. For similar materials, such as TRIP steels, the strengthening mechanism involves the transformation of metastable austenite to martensite during deformation.
1999-10-25
Technical Paper
1999-01-3534
John M.E. Storey, Norberto Domingo, Samuel A. Lewis, David K. Irick
As interest has grown in diesel emissions and diesel engine aftertreatment, so has the importance of analyzing all components of the exhaust. One of the more costly and difficult measurements to make is the collection and analysis of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) in the exhaust. These compounds include alkane and alkenes from C12-C24, and the 2-5 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These compounds can be present in both the particulate (i.e. on the filter) and gaseous phase, and cannot be collected with bag samples. Typically, a sorbent is used downstream of the particulate collection filters to collect these compounds. Sorbent phases include polyurethane foam (PUF), Tenax™, XAD-type resins, and activated carbon. The SOCs are removed from the sorbent either by solvent extraction (PUF and XAD) or thermal desorption (Tenax™ and activated carbon). Each of these methods have advantages and disadvantages.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0595
Rajive Dhingra, Jonathan G. Overly, Gary A. Davis, Sujit Das, Stan Hadley, Bruce Tonn
This project team conducted a life-cycle-based environmental evaluation of new, lightweight materials (e.g., titanium, magnesium) used in two concept 3XVs -- i.e., automobiles that are three times more fuel efficient than today's automobiles -- that are being designed and developed in support of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program. The two concept vehicles studied were the DaimlerChrysler ESX2 and the Ford P2000. Data for this research were drawn from a wide range of sources, including: the two automobile manufacturers; automobile industry reports; government and proprietary databases; past life-cycle assessments; interviews with industry experts; and models.
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