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Viewing 1 to 30 of 77
1985-04-01
Technical Paper
850869
Daniel J. Lesieutre, John P. Sullivan
A vortex lattice method for the aerodynamic analysis of counter-rotation propellers was developed. This model along with an unsteady Sears analysis for correcting the quasi-steady loadings that are obtained from the vortex lattice model were used to predict the performance of counter-rotation propeller systems. The method developed shows good correlation with experimental results. The investigation into the unsteady loadings on each of the propellers indicates that significant variations in loading occur due to the unsteady flow and due to the propeller blade passage. These variations were found to be as high as 17 percent of the mean value. The parametric studies that were performed indicate that reducing the rear propeller's diameter or rotational speed results in a loss of efficiency.
2011-09-13
Journal Article
2011-01-2272
Wolfgang Schweiger, Werner Schoefmann, Andrea Vacca
This paper presents a simulation model for the analysis of internal gear ring pumps. The model follows a multi domain simulation approach comprising sub-models for parametric geometry generation, fluid dynamic simulation, numerical calculation of characteristic geometry data and CAD/FEM integration. The sub-models are interacting in different domains and relevant design and simulation parameters are accessible in a central, easy to handle graphical user interface. The potentials of the described tool are represented by simulation results for both steady state and transient pump operating conditions and by their correlation with measured data. Although the presented approach is suitable to all applications of gear ring pumps, a particular focus is given to hydraulic actuation systems used in automotive drivetrain applications.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1118
Muhsin M. Ameen, John Abraham
Abstract Accurate modeling of the transient structure of reacting diesel jets is important as transient features like autoignition, flame propagation, and flame stabilization have been shown to correlate with combustion efficiency and pollutant formation. In this work, results from Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations of flame lift-off in diesel jets are examined to provide insight into the lift-off physics. The large eddy simulation (LES) technique is also used to computationally model a lifted jet flame at conditions representative of those encountered in diesel engines. An unsteady flamelet progress variable (UFPV) model is used as the turbulent combustion model in both RANS simulations and LES. In the model, a look-up table of reaction source terms is generated as a function of mixture fraction Z, stoichiometric scalar dissipation rate Xst, and progress variable Cst by solving the unsteady flamelet equations.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0358
Bradley M. Pederson, Farshid Sadeghi, Carl Wassgren
Rolling element bearings provide near frictionless relative motion between two rotating parts. Automotive transmissions use various ball and rolling element bearings to accommodate the relative motion between rotating elements. In order to understand changes in bearing performance due to the loads imposed through the transmission, advanced modeling of the bearing is required. This paper focuses on the effects of cage flexibility on bearing performance. A flexible cage model was developed and incorporated into a six degree-of-freedom dynamic, deep groove ball bearing model. A lumped mass approach was used to represent the cage flexibility and was validated through an ANSYS forced response analyses of the cage. Results from the newly developed Flexible Cage Model (FCM) and an identical numerical model employing a rigid bearing cage were compared to determine the effects of varying ball-to-cage pocket clearance and cage stiffness on cage motion and ball-to-cage pocket contact forces.
2005-07-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2983
Yan-Fu Kuo, Dawn R. Whitaker, George T.-C. Chiu, James E. Alleman
This paper presents a system-level design and initial equivalent systems mass (ESM) analysis for a solid-phase thermophilic aerobic reactor (STAR) system prototype that is designed for a Mars surface mission. STAR is a biological solid waste treatment system that reduces solid waste, neutralizes pathogens, and produces a stabilized product amenable to nutrient reuse and water recovery in a closed life support system. The STAR system is designed for long-duration space missions or long-term remote planetary operations. A system-level design analysis for sizing a STAR process and the subsequent ESM based sensitivity analysis based on a 600-day Mars surface mission with a 6-person crew will be presented. Preliminary ESM sensitivity analysis identified that improving system energy conservation efficiency should be the focus of future research once the fundamental STAR process development has matured.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2399
Michael Sprengel, Monika Ivantysynova
Abstract A novel Blended Hydraulic Hybrid transmission architecture is presented in this paper with benefits over conventional designs. This novel configuration combines elements of a hydrostatic transmission, a parallel hybrid, and a selectively connectable high pressure accumulator using passive and actively controlled logic elements. Losses are reduced compared to existing series hybrid transmissions by enabling the units to operate efficiently at pressures below the current high pressure accumulator's pressure. A selective connection to the high pressure accumulator also allows for higher system precharge which increases regenerative braking torque and energy capture with little determent to system efficiency. Finally operating as a hydrostatic transmission increases transmission stiffness (i.e. driver response) and may improve driver feel in certain situations when compared to a conventional series hybrid transmission.
2014-09-16
Technical Paper
2014-01-2138
Ron Wang, Michelle Bash, Steven D. Pekarek
Abstract In this research, excitation strategies for a salient-pole wound rotor synchronous machine are explored using a magnetic equivalent circuit model that includes core loss. It is shown that the excitation obtained is considerably different than would be obtained using traditional qd-based models. However, through evaluation of the resulting ‘optimal’ excitation, a relatively straightforward field-oriented type control is developed that is consistent with a desire for efficiency yet control simplicity. Validation is achieved through hardware experiment. The usefulness/applicability of the simplified control to variable speed applications is then considered.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0554
Nicole Lambiase, Brian Benoy, Kristen De La Rosa, Vahid Motevalli, George Molen, Douglas Nelson, Robert Alley, Patrick Walsh
EcoCAR 2: Plugging In to the Future (EcoCAR) is North America's premier collegiate automotive engineering competition, challenging students with systems-level advanced powertrain design and integration. The three-year Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition (AVTC) series is organized by Argonne National Laboratory, headline sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and General Motors (GM), and sponsored by more than 28 industry and government leaders. Fifteen university teams from across North America are challenged to reduce the environmental impact of a 2013 Chevrolet Malibu by redesigning the vehicle powertrain without compromising performance, safety, or consumer acceptability. During the three-year program, EcoCAR teams follow a real-world Vehicle Development Process (VDP) modeled after GM's own VDP. The VDP serves as a roadmap for the engineering process of designing, building and refining advanced technology vehicles.
2009-07-12
Technical Paper
2009-01-2426
Jeffrey D. Onken, Barrett S. Caldwell
This paper introduces an integration-level analysis tool to provide feedback for high-level trade spaces. The Purdue University Lunar C3I Model integrates approximations of several domain-specific models to simulate for many years the effect of network and asset parameters. This paper discusses the communication, anomaly response, and autonomy simulation models in depth. Results of these models provide specific examples of integration-level figures of merit that can be useful for comparing different campaign implementations. These figures of merit are contrasted with related domain-specific figures of merit in order to demonstrate the need for higher-level system integration decisions. A final example of integration-level results and interpretation discusses the autonomy level of the Altair lunar lander.
2009-10-06
Technical Paper
2009-01-2846
Michael A. Holland, Keith Harmeyer, John H. Lumkes
A low-cost hydrostatic absorption dynamometer has been developed for small to medium sized engines. The dynamometer was designed and built by students to support student projects and educational activities. The availability of such a dynamometer permits engine break-in cycles, performance testing, and laboratory instruction in the areas of engines, fuels, sensors, and data acquisition. The dynamometer, capable of loading engines up to 60kW at 155Nm and 3600rpm, incorporates a two-section gear pump and an electronically operated proportional pressure control valve to develop and control the load. A bypass valve permits the use of only one pump section, allowing increased fidelity of load control at lower torque levels. Torque is measured directly on the drive shaft with a strain gage. Torque and speed signals are transmitted by an inductively-powered collar mounted to the dynamometer drive shaft. Pressure transducers at the pump inlet and pump outlet allow secondary load measurement.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980786
Rakesh Aneja, John Abraham
Results of computations of flows, sprays and combustion performed in an optically- accessible Diesel engine are presented. These computed results are compared with measured values of chamber pressure, liquid penetration, and soot distribution, deduced from flame luminosity photographs obtained in the engine at Sandia National Laboratories and reported in the literature. The computations were performed for two operating conditions representing low load and high load conditions as reported in the experimental work. The computed and measured peak pressures agree within 5% for both the low load and the high load conditions. The heat release rates derived from the computations are consistent with expectations for Diesel combustion with a premixed phase of heat release and then a diffusion phase. The computed soot distribution shows noticeable differences from the measured one.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980281
Peter C.-C. Lai, Werner Soedel
Helmholtz resonator has been used in industry for a long time to reduce the noise from exhaust system in vehicle or machinery. Numerous investigations have been done in the past to study the effect of a Helmholtz resonator connected to a pipeline. A general procedure for the analysis of curved or flat, thin two dimensional gas cavities such as thin compressor or engine manifolds or so-called thin shell type muffler elements, which can efficiently utilize the limited space of hermetically sealed compressors or small engine compartments, has been developed by the authors, as long as the thickness of the cavities is substantially small compared to the shortest wavelength of interest. However, to the authors' knowledge, a Helmholtz resonator attached to a rectangular thin muffler element, which is similar to a refrigeration compressor muffler, has not been analyzed.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
981071
Venkatraman lyer, John Abraham
Numerical computations of combusting transient jets are performed under diesel-like conditions. Discussions of the structure of such jets are presented from global and detailed points of view. From a global point of view, we show that the computed flame heights agree with deductions from theory and that integrated soot mass and heat release rates are consistent with expected trends. We present results of several paramaters which characterise the details of the jet structure. These are fuel mass fractions, temperature, heat release rates, soot and NO. Some of these parameters are compared with the structure of a combusting diesel spray as deduced from measurements and reported in the literature. The heat release rate contours show that the region of chemical reactions is confined to a thin sheet as expected for a diffusion flame. The soot contour plots appear to agree qualitatively with the experimental observations.
1998-04-21
Technical Paper
981258
Timothy L. Skvarenina, Oleg Wasynczuk, Paul C. Krause, Steven D. Pekarek
Detailed computer models of system components for More Electric Aircraft have been developed using the Advanced Control System Language (ACSL) and its graphical front-end, Graphic Modeller. Among the devices modeled are a wound-rotor synchronous generator with parallel bridge-rectifier outputs, a switched-reluctance generator, and various loads including a DC-DC converter, an inverter-driven induction motor, and an electro-hydrostatic actuator. Results from the simulations are presented together with corroborating experimental test results.
1998-04-21
Technical Paper
981256
Steven D. Pekarek, E. A. Walters, T. L. Skvarenina, O. Wasynczuk
In this paper, a recently-developed algorithmic method of deriving the state equations of power systems containing power electronic components is described. Therein the system is described by the pertinent branch parameters and the circuit topology; however, unlike circuit-based algorithms, the difference equations are not implemented at the branch level. Instead, the composite system state equations are established. A demonstration of the computer implementation of this algorithm to model a variable-speed, constant-frequency aircraft generation system is described. Because of the large number of states and complexity of the system, particular attention is placed on the development of a model structure which provides optimal simulation efficiency.
1998-04-21
Technical Paper
981269
Patrick L. Chapman, Scott D. Sudhoff
The method of multiple reference frames is employed in the development of a state variable model for brushless DC drives with non-sinusoidal back emf waveforms. This model has the desirable features of being valid for transient and steady-state analysis as well as having state variables that are constant in the steady-state. The model facilitates both nonlinear and linear system analysis and control design. Computer simulation and experimental data are included to validate the analysis.
1998-09-14
Technical Paper
981979
Nohoon Ki, Harry G. Gibson, Nathan J. Parsons
A track-type grapple log skidder was dynamically modeled to allow machine modification by computer to determine the effects of these modifications on the operation of the machine in the forest. The model consisted of an undercarriage, power train, log/drag force, and logging equipment (arch and grapple). This skidder had three types of logging attachments: winch, swinging boom (grapple), and single-function arch (grapple). Each was modeled and simulated under various conditions. The dynamic model of the skidder can be used to analyze its drawbar pull capability and lateral stability with various log weights and soil types on steep slopes. Validation of this model is needed later.
1998-06-02
Technical Paper
981840
Y. C. Shin, B. R. Jorgensen, S. A. Jensen
Dynamics of machine tool components play a critical role in the outcome of machining processes. This paper addresses several important issues on machine tool and machining dynamics. It illustrates the dynamic behavior of structural components under operating conditions and presents an improved technique for modeling structural non-linearity. It also describes spindle modeling capability that has been developed to predict dynamic and thermal characteristics of spindle systems. Finally, the paper discusses the impact of non-linear dynamics on machining stability.
2005-07-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-3111
Sang-hun Lee, Albert J. Heber, M. Katherine Banks
Most of the gaseous contaminants generated inside ALS (Advanced Life Support) cabins can be degraded to some degree by microbial degradation in a biofilter. The entry of biofiltration techniques into ALS will most likely involve integration with existing physico-chemical methods. However, in this study, cabin air quality treated by only biofiltration was predicted using the one-box and biofiltration models. Based on BVAD (Baseline Values and Assumptions Document) and SMAC (Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations), ammonia and carbon monoxide will be the critical compounds for biofilter design and control. Experimentation is needed to identify the pertinent microbial parameters and removal efficiency of carbon monoxide and to validate the results of this preliminary investigation.
2006-11-07
Technical Paper
2006-01-3045
Dionysios C. Aliprantis, Oleg Wasynczuk, Ning Wu, Charles Eric Lucas, M. Abul Masrur
The optimal design of hybrid-electric vehicle power systems poses a challenge to the system analyst, who is presented with a host of parameters to fine-tune, along with stringent performance criteria and multiple design objectives to meet. Herein, a methodology is presented to transform such a design task into a constrained multi-objective optimization problem, which is solved using a distributed evolutionary algorithm. A power system model representative of a series hybrid-electric vehicle is considered as a paradigm to support the illustration of the proposed methodology, with particular emphasis on the power system's time-domain performance.
2006-11-07
Technical Paper
2006-01-3050
A. M. Cramer, R. R. Chan, S. D. Sudhoff, Y. Lee, M. R. Surprenant, N. S. Tyler, E. L. Zivi, R. A. Youngs
A layered approach to the simulation of dynamically interdependent systems is presented. In particular, the approach is applied to the integrated engineering plant of a notional all-electric warship. The models and parameters of the notional ship are presented herein. This approach is used to study disruptions to the integrated engineering plant caused by anti-ship missiles. Example simulation results establish the effectiveness of this approach in examining the propagation of faults and cascading failures throughout a dynamically interdependent system of systems.
2006-12-05
Technical Paper
2006-01-3605
Gerardo Gomez, John M. Starkey
This paper presents a method for indirect measurement of tire slip angles from chassis acceleration, yaw rate, and steer angle measurements. The chassis is assumed to be rigid so that acceleration data can be integrated to estimate velocities of the front and rear of the vehicle, from which slip angles can be predicted. The difference in front and rear slip angles is indicative of vehicle oversteer/understeer. Understeer data can then be correlated with position on the track to better understand vehicle handling behavior, aiding the tuning process. The technique is presented, and shown to work well with simulated data, even when the data is corrupted with up to 20% noise. Therefore, the inversion process presented here is theoretically sound. However, when the technique is applied to measured data from race cars, it is shown to be inaccurate. One suspected problem is the difficulty of getting accurate yaw rate data.
2006-11-07
Technical Paper
2006-01-3102
Ruchir Saheba, Mario Rotea, Oleg Wasynczuk, Steven Pekarek, Brett Jordan
A temperature estimation algorithm (thermal observer) that provides accurate estimates of the thermal states of an electric machine in real time is presented. The thermal observer is designed to be a Kalman filter that combines thermal state predictions from a lumped-parameter thermal model of the electric machine with temperature measurements from a single external temperature sensor. An analysis based on the error covariance matrix of the Kalman filter is presented to guide the selection of the best sensor location. The thermal observer performance is demonstrated using a 3.8 kW permanent-magnet machine. Comparison of the thermal observer estimates and the actual temperatures demonstrate that this approach can provide accurate knowledge of the machine's thermal states despite modeling uncertainty and unknown initial machine thermal states.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0783
Peter J. Schubert, Lev Vitkin, David Braun
Audio playbacks are mechanisms which read data from a storage medium and produce commands and signals which an audio system turns into music. Playbacks are constantly changed to meet market demands, requiring that the control software be updated quickly and efficiently. This paper reviews a 12 month project using the MATLAB/Simulink/Stateflow environment for model-based development, system simulation, autocode generation, and hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) verification for playbacks which read music CDs or MP3 disks. Our team began with a “clean slate” approach to playback architecture, and demonstrated working units running production-ready code. This modular, layered architecture enables rapid development and verification of new playback mechanisms, thereby reducing the time needed to evaluate playback mechanisms and integrate into a complete infotainment system.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0996
Kannan N. Premnath, Michael McCracken, John Abraham
This paper reviews some applications of lattice Boltzmann methods (LBM) to compute multiphase flows. The method is based on the solution of a kinetic equation which describes the evolution of the distribution of the population of particles whose collective behavior reproduces fluid behavior. The distribution is modified by particle streaming and collisions on a lattice. Modeling of physics at a mesoscopic level enables LBM to naturally incorporate physical properties needed to compute complex flows. In multiphase flows, the surface tension and phase segregation are incorporated by considering intermolecular attraction forces. Furthermore, the solution of the kinetic equations representing linear advection and collision, in which non-linearity is lumped locally, makes it parallelizable with relative ease. In this paper, a brief review of the lattice Boltzmann method relevant to engine sprays will be presented.
2004-11-30
Technical Paper
2004-01-3525
Enrico Nino Manes, John M. Starkey
Typical vehicle dynamics simulations demand a trade-off between short computation times and accuracy. Many of the more simple models are based on the kinematic roll center and the more accurate models tend to be multi-body dynamics simulation programs. There is a need for a model that improves the accuracy of the kinematic roll center models while still maintaining short computation times. Such a model could be used track-side during races to guide race teams toward improved handling. The model presented in this paper removes many of the assumptions and limitations of the kinematic roll center model. The model accounts for three-dimensional forces present at the contact patch and predicts deflections of suspension components. The modeling approach is applied to a NASCAR Craftsman Truck to predict the effects of suspension design and tuning on steady-state understeer characteristics of the vehicle. Braking and acceleration forces can also be applied to the vehicle.
2004-11-30
Technical Paper
2004-01-3535
Enrico Nino Manes, John M. Starkey
Conventional suspension analysis of three-dimensional suspensions typically use two-dimensional analyses. This is done by projecting suspension components onto two-dimensional planes and then performing a two-dimensional analysis in each of these orthogonal planes or neglecting motions in one of the planes entirely. This requires multiple iterations because changes in one plane require a checking of their effects on motion in the other orthogonal planes. In doing so, much of the insight and accuracy gained from a three-dimensional analysis can be lost. A three-dimensional kinematic analysis approach is presented and applied to a dual A-Arm suspension system. All motions are considered instantaneously about a screw axis instead of a point as used by the usual two-dimensional modeling approach. The model predicts deflections of suspension components in response to the three-dimensional forces present at the contact patch.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0103
Lijun Song, John Abraham
In this paper, a wall-modified interactive flamelet model is developed for improving the modeling of Diesel combustion. The objective is to include the effects of wall heat loss on the transient flame structure. The essential idea is to compute several flamelets with several representative enthalpy defects which account for wall heat loss. Then, the averaged flamelet profile can be obtained through a linear fit between the flamelets according to the enthalpy defect of the local gas which results from the wall heat loss. The enthalpy defect is estimated as the difference between the enthalpy in a flamelet without wall heat loss, which would correspond to the enthalpy in the gas without wall heat loss, and the gas with wall heat loss. The improved model is applied to model combustion in a Diesel engine. In the application, two flamelets, one without wall heat loss and one with wall heat loss, are considered.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0911
Y. Ichikawa, H. Satou, H. Baba, J. Bayyouk, J. I. Park, D. E. Adams
Noise Vibration Harshness (NVH) is one of the key factors in selecting and designing Automotive A/C systems. This paper will deal with the analysis of pressure pulsation in the suction manifold of a multi-cylinder compressor. Numerical simulation methods have been developed to model and simulate the compression cycle, valve dynamics and mass flow rate into the compressor cylinder. The model was also enhanced to include pressure fluctuations due to the interactions between multiple cylinders in the suction manifold. The analytical results from the simulation program compared favorably with the experimental results. The validation and confirmation of the simulation model was successfully accomplished thus yielding a very valuable tool that could be used during the design stage.
2007-09-17
Technical Paper
2007-01-3910
David E. Gevers, Margaret M. Ratcliff, James A. Hatch
There has always been, from the very first UAV, a need for providing cost-effective methods of deploying unmanned aircraft systems at high altitudes. Missions for UAVs at high altitudes are used to conduct atmospheric research, perform global mapping missions, collect remote sensing data, and establish long range communications networks. The team of Gevers Aircraft, Technology Management Group, and Purdue University have designed an innovative balloon launched UAV for these near space applications. A UAV (Payload Return Vehicle) with a nested morphing wing was designed in order to meet the challenges of high altitude flight, and long range and endurance without the need for descent rate control with rockets or a feathering mode.
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