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Viewing 1 to 30 of 41
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1128
May Yen, John Abraham
Abstract In this work, computations of reacting diesel jets, including soot and NO, are carried out for a wide range of conditions by employing a RANS model in which an unsteady flamelet progress variable (UFPV) sub-model is employed to represent turbulence/chemistry interactions. Soot kinetics is represented using a chemical mechanism that models the growth of soot precursors starting from a single aromatic ring by hydrogen abstraction and carbon (acetylene) addition and NO is modeled using the kinetics from a sub-mechanism of GRI-Mech 3.0. Tracer particles are used to track the residence time of the injected mass in the jet. For the soot and NO computations, this residence time is used to track the progression of the soot and NO reactions in time. The conditions selected reflect changes in injection pressure, chamber temperature, oxygen concentration, and density, and orifice diameter.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1906
Ashish Vora, Haotian Wu, Chuang Wang, Yili Qian, Gregory Shaver, Vahid Motevalli, Peter Meckl, Oleg Wasynczuk, Haiyan Zhang
Abstract Hybrid powertrains with multiple sources of power have generated new control challenges in the automotive industry. Purdue University's participation in EcoCAR 2, an Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition managed by the Argonne National Laboratories and sponsored by GM and DOE, has provided an exciting opportunity to create a comprehensive test-bench for the development and validation of advanced hybrid powertrain control strategies. As one of 15 competing university teams, the Purdue EcoMakers are re-engineering a donated 2013 Chevrolet Malibu into a plug-in parallel- through-the-road hybrid-electric vehicle, to reduce its environmental impact without compromising performance, safety or consumer acceptability. This paper describes the Purdue team's control development process for the EcoCAR 2 competition.
2013-05-13
Journal Article
2013-01-1974
Michael D. Hayward, J. Stuart Bolton, Patricia Davies
The identification of the dominant noise sources in diesel engines and the assessment of their contribution to far-field noise is a process that can involve both fired and motored testing. In the present work, the cross-spectral densities of signals from cylinder pressure transducers, accelerometers mounted on the engine surface, and microphones (in the near and far fields), were used to identify dominant noise sources and estimate the transfer paths from the various “inputs” (i.e., the cylinder pressures, the accelerometers and the near field microphones) to the far field microphones. The method is based on singular value decomposition of the input cross-spectral matrix to relate the input measurements to independent virtual sources. The frequencies at which a particular input is strongly affected by an independent source are highlighted, and with knowledge of transducer locations, inferences can be drawn as to possible noise source mechanisms.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980786
Rakesh Aneja, John Abraham
Results of computations of flows, sprays and combustion performed in an optically- accessible Diesel engine are presented. These computed results are compared with measured values of chamber pressure, liquid penetration, and soot distribution, deduced from flame luminosity photographs obtained in the engine at Sandia National Laboratories and reported in the literature. The computations were performed for two operating conditions representing low load and high load conditions as reported in the experimental work. The computed and measured peak pressures agree within 5% for both the low load and the high load conditions. The heat release rates derived from the computations are consistent with expectations for Diesel combustion with a premixed phase of heat release and then a diffusion phase. The computed soot distribution shows noticeable differences from the measured one.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
981071
Venkatraman lyer, John Abraham
Numerical computations of combusting transient jets are performed under diesel-like conditions. Discussions of the structure of such jets are presented from global and detailed points of view. From a global point of view, we show that the computed flame heights agree with deductions from theory and that integrated soot mass and heat release rates are consistent with expected trends. We present results of several paramaters which characterise the details of the jet structure. These are fuel mass fractions, temperature, heat release rates, soot and NO. Some of these parameters are compared with the structure of a combusting diesel spray as deduced from measurements and reported in the literature. The heat release rate contours show that the region of chemical reactions is confined to a thin sheet as expected for a diffusion flame. The soot contour plots appear to agree qualitatively with the experimental observations.
1998-04-21
Technical Paper
981258
Timothy L. Skvarenina, Oleg Wasynczuk, Paul C. Krause, Steven D. Pekarek
Detailed computer models of system components for More Electric Aircraft have been developed using the Advanced Control System Language (ACSL) and its graphical front-end, Graphic Modeller. Among the devices modeled are a wound-rotor synchronous generator with parallel bridge-rectifier outputs, a switched-reluctance generator, and various loads including a DC-DC converter, an inverter-driven induction motor, and an electro-hydrostatic actuator. Results from the simulations are presented together with corroborating experimental test results.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0868
Patrick J. Cunningham, Peter H. Meckl
A gravimetric particulate measurement system, which extracts samples isokinetically from raw exhaust, is presented to quantify the particulate mass stored in diesel particulate filters. The purpose of this measurement system is to facilitate the study of wall-flow filter behavior at different particulate load levels. Within this paper, the design considerations for the particulate measurement system are detailed and its operation is described. The accuracy of the measurement is examined through a theoretical error analysis and direct experimental comparison to the differential weight of a diesel particulate filter. Experimental results are also presented to validate the ability of the system to maintain the isokinetic sampling condition.
2006-11-07
Technical Paper
2006-01-3045
Dionysios C. Aliprantis, Oleg Wasynczuk, Ning Wu, Charles Eric Lucas, M. Abul Masrur
The optimal design of hybrid-electric vehicle power systems poses a challenge to the system analyst, who is presented with a host of parameters to fine-tune, along with stringent performance criteria and multiple design objectives to meet. Herein, a methodology is presented to transform such a design task into a constrained multi-objective optimization problem, which is solved using a distributed evolutionary algorithm. A power system model representative of a series hybrid-electric vehicle is considered as a paradigm to support the illustration of the proposed methodology, with particular emphasis on the power system's time-domain performance.
2006-11-07
Technical Paper
2006-01-3050
A. M. Cramer, R. R. Chan, S. D. Sudhoff, Y. Lee, M. R. Surprenant, N. S. Tyler, E. L. Zivi, R. A. Youngs
A layered approach to the simulation of dynamically interdependent systems is presented. In particular, the approach is applied to the integrated engineering plant of a notional all-electric warship. The models and parameters of the notional ship are presented herein. This approach is used to study disruptions to the integrated engineering plant caused by anti-ship missiles. Example simulation results establish the effectiveness of this approach in examining the propagation of faults and cascading failures throughout a dynamically interdependent system of systems.
2006-11-13
Technical Paper
2006-32-0041
Marko Cater, Nathan W. Bolander, Farshid Sadeghi
An experimental apparatus and a numerical model have been designed and developed to examine the lubrication condition and frictional losses at the piston and cylinder interface. The experimental apparatus utilizes components from a single cylinder, ten horsepower engine in a novel suspended liner arrangement. The test rig has been specifically designed to reduce the number of operating variables while utilizing actual components and geometry. A mixed lubrication model for the complete ring-pack and piston skirt was developed to correlate with experimental measurements and provide further insight into the sources of frictional losses. The results demonstrate the effects of speed and viscosity on the overall friction losses at the piston and cylinder liner interface. Comparisons between the experimental and analytical results show good agreement.
2006-11-07
Technical Paper
2006-01-3102
Ruchir Saheba, Mario Rotea, Oleg Wasynczuk, Steven Pekarek, Brett Jordan
A temperature estimation algorithm (thermal observer) that provides accurate estimates of the thermal states of an electric machine in real time is presented. The thermal observer is designed to be a Kalman filter that combines thermal state predictions from a lumped-parameter thermal model of the electric machine with temperature measurements from a single external temperature sensor. An analysis based on the error covariance matrix of the Kalman filter is presented to guide the selection of the best sensor location. The thermal observer performance is demonstrated using a 3.8 kW permanent-magnet machine. Comparison of the thermal observer estimates and the actual temperatures demonstrate that this approach can provide accurate knowledge of the machine's thermal states despite modeling uncertainty and unknown initial machine thermal states.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0996
Kannan N. Premnath, Michael McCracken, John Abraham
This paper reviews some applications of lattice Boltzmann methods (LBM) to compute multiphase flows. The method is based on the solution of a kinetic equation which describes the evolution of the distribution of the population of particles whose collective behavior reproduces fluid behavior. The distribution is modified by particle streaming and collisions on a lattice. Modeling of physics at a mesoscopic level enables LBM to naturally incorporate physical properties needed to compute complex flows. In multiphase flows, the surface tension and phase segregation are incorporated by considering intermolecular attraction forces. Furthermore, the solution of the kinetic equations representing linear advection and collision, in which non-linearity is lumped locally, makes it parallelizable with relative ease. In this paper, a brief review of the lattice Boltzmann method relevant to engine sprays will be presented.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0103
Lijun Song, John Abraham
In this paper, a wall-modified interactive flamelet model is developed for improving the modeling of Diesel combustion. The objective is to include the effects of wall heat loss on the transient flame structure. The essential idea is to compute several flamelets with several representative enthalpy defects which account for wall heat loss. Then, the averaged flamelet profile can be obtained through a linear fit between the flamelets according to the enthalpy defect of the local gas which results from the wall heat loss. The enthalpy defect is estimated as the difference between the enthalpy in a flamelet without wall heat loss, which would correspond to the enthalpy in the gas without wall heat loss, and the gas with wall heat loss. The improved model is applied to model combustion in a Diesel engine. In the application, two flamelets, one without wall heat loss and one with wall heat loss, are considered.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0911
Y. Ichikawa, H. Satou, H. Baba, J. Bayyouk, J. I. Park, D. E. Adams
Noise Vibration Harshness (NVH) is one of the key factors in selecting and designing Automotive A/C systems. This paper will deal with the analysis of pressure pulsation in the suction manifold of a multi-cylinder compressor. Numerical simulation methods have been developed to model and simulate the compression cycle, valve dynamics and mass flow rate into the compressor cylinder. The model was also enhanced to include pressure fluctuations due to the interactions between multiple cylinders in the suction manifold. The analytical results from the simulation program compared favorably with the experimental results. The validation and confirmation of the simulation model was successfully accomplished thus yielding a very valuable tool that could be used during the design stage.
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2555
Sybil Sharvelle, M. Katherine Banks, Albert J. Heber
An important function of life support systems developed for a long duration human mission to Mars is the ability to recycle water and air. The Bio-Regenerative Environmental Air Treatment for Health (BREATHe) is part of a multicomponent life support system and will simultaneously treat wastewater and air. The BREATHe system will consist of packed bed biofilm reactors. Model waste streams will be used for experiments conducted during the design phase of the BREATHe system. This paper summarizes expected characteristics of water and air waste steams that would be generated by a crew of six during a human mission to Mars. In addition to waste air and water generation rates, the chemical composition of each waste stream is defined. Specifically, chemical constituents expected to be present in hygiene wastewater, dishwater, laundry water, atmospheric condensate, and cabin air are presented.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-1041
Rebecca Owston, Vinicio Magi, John Abraham
The following computational study examines the structure of sonic hydrogen jets using inlet conditions similar to those encountered in direct-injection hydrogen engines. Cases utilizing the same mass and momentum flux while varying exit-to-chamber pressure ratios have been investigated in a constant-volume computational domain. Furthermore, subsonic versus sonic structures have been compared using both hydrogen and ethylene fuel jets. Finally, the accuracy of scaling arguments to characterize an underexpanded jet by a subsonic “equivalent jet” has been assessed. It is shown that far downstream of the expansion region, the overall jet structure conforms to expectations for self-similarity in the far-field of subsonic jets. In the near-field, variations in fuel inlet-to-chamber pressure ratios are shown to influence the mixing properties of sonic hydrogen jets. In general, higher pressure ratios result in longer shock barrel length, though numerical resolution requirements increase.
2007-07-09
Technical Paper
2007-01-3127
Jay C. Rozzi, Richard W. Kaszeta, Timothy S. Fisher
The new devices and missions to achieve the aims of NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) are creating increasingly demanding thermal environments and applications. In particular, the low conductance of metal-to-metal interfaces used in the thermal switches lengthen the cool-down phase and resource usage for spacecraft instruments. During this work, we developed and tested a vacuum-compatible, durable, heat-conduction interface that employs carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays directly anchored on the mating metal surfaces via microwave plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). We demonstrated that CNT-based thermal interface materials have the potential to exceed the performance of currently available options for thermal switches and other applications.
2008-11-11
Journal Article
2008-01-2867
Mark Gries, Oleg Wasynczuk, Barbara Selby, Peter T. Lamm
Due to the instabilities that may occur in power systems with regulated loads such as those used in military aircraft, ships, and terrestrial vehicles, many analysis techniques and design methodologies have been developed to ensure stable operation for expected operating conditions. However, many of these techniques are difficult to apply to complex systems and do not guarantee large-displacement stability following major disturbances such as faults, regenerative operation, large pulsed loads, and/or the loss of generating capacity. In this paper, a design paradigm is set forth guaranteeing large-displacement stability of a power system containing a significant penetration of regulated (constant-power) loads for any value of load power up to and including the steady-state rating of the source. Initial investigations are performed using an idealized model of a dc-source to determine the minimum requirements that ensure large-displacement stability.
2008-10-07
Journal Article
2008-01-2723
Ganesh Kumar Seeniraj, Monika Ivantysynova
Noise generation in axial piston machines can be attributed to two main sources; fluid borne and structure borne. Any attempt towards noise reduction in axial piston machines should focus on simultaneous reduction of these two sources. A multi-parameter multi-objective optimization approach to design valve plates to reduce both sources of noise for pumps which operate in a wide range of operating conditions has been detailed in a previous work (Seeniraj and Ivantysynova, 2008). The focus of this paper is to explain the background and to demonstrate the functionality and usefulness of the methodology for pump design.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1466
Rebecca Owston, Vinicio Magi, John Abraham
This paper provides a comparison of wall heat fluxes and quenching distances as one-dimensional hydrogen and heptane flames impinge head-on onto a wall. It is shown that the quenching distances for stoichiometric H2/air and C7H16/air flames under the specified conditions of this study are about the same, but the wall heat flux for the H2/air flames is approximately a factor of two greater. For lean H2/air mixtures, the quenching distance increases substantially and the wall heat flux decreases. To understand more clearly the interplay of flame speed, temperature, thermal diffusivity, and surface kinetics on the results, studies of H2/O2 flames are also carried out.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0795
Sayan Biswas, Li Qiao
Abstract An experiment has been developed to investigate the ignition characteristics of ultra-lean premixed H2/air mixtures by a supersonic hot jet. The hot jet is generated by combustion of a stoichiometric mixture in a small prechamber. The apparatus adopted a dual-chamber design in which a small-volume (1% of the main chamber by volume) prechamber was installed within a large-volume main chamber. A small orifice (nozzle) connects the two chambers. Spark initiated combustion inside the prechamber causes a pressure rise and pushes the gases though the nozzle, resulting in a hot jet that would ignite the lean mixture in the main chamber. Simultaneous high-speed Schlieren photography and OH* Chemiluminescence were applied to visualize the jet penetration and the ignition processes inside the main chamber. Hot Wire Pyrometry (HWP) was used to measure temperature distribution of the transient hot jet.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0575
Zhiyan Wang, Muhsin M. Ameen, Sibendu Som, John Abraham
Abstract The basic idea behind large-eddy simulation (LES) is to accurately resolve the large energy-containing scales and to use subgrid-scale (SGS) models for the smaller scales. The accuracy of LES can be significantly impacted by the numerical discretization schemes and the choice of the SGS model. This work investigates the accuracy of low-order LES codes in the simulation of a turbulent round jet which is representative of fuel jets in engines. The turbulent jet studied is isothermal with a Reynolds number of 6800. It is simulated using Converge, which is second-order accurate in space and first-order in time, and FLEDS, developed at Purdue University, which is sixth-order accurate in space and fourth-order in time. The high-order code requires the resolution of acoustic time-scales and hence is approximately 10 times more expensive than the low-order code.
1969-02-01
Technical Paper
690163
J. B. Liljedahl, E. J. McCormick
This paper discusses the necessity for designing farm tractors which have logical, rather than arbitrary, safety features. The paper is directed primarily to those who buy and use industrial equipment and urges this group to exercise their influence on tractor design by purchasing only those vehicles which meet recommended standards for safety and construction.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1874
Tongyang Shi, Yangfan Liu, J Stuart Bolton, Frank Eberhardt, Warner Frazer
Abstract Wideband Acoustical Holography (WBH), which is a monopole-based, equivalent source procedure (J. Hald, “Wideband Acoustical Holography,” INTER-NOISE 2014), has proven to offer accurate noise source visualization results in experiments with a simple noise source: e.g., a loudspeaker (T. Shi, Y. Liu, J.S. Bolton, “The Use of Wideband Holography for Noise Source Visualization”, NOISE-CON 2016). From a previous study, it was found that the advantage of this procedure is the ability to optimize the solution in the case of an under-determined system: i.e., when the number of measurements is much smaller than the number of parameters that must be estimated in the model. In the present work, a diesel engine noise source was measured by using one set of measurements from a thirty-five channel combo-array placed in front of the engine.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1844
Jiawei Liu, Yangfan Liu, J. Stuart Bolton
Abstract In modern engine design, downsizing and reducing weight while still providing an increased amount of power has been a general trend in recent decades. Traditionally, an engine design with superior NVH performance usually comes with a heavier, thus sturdier structure. Therefore, modern engine design requires that NVH be considered in the very early design stage to avoid modifications of engine structure at the last minute, when very few changes can be made. NVH design optimization of engine components has become more practical due to the development of computer software and hardware. However, there is still a need for smarter algorithms to draw a direct relationship between the design and the radiated sound power. At the moment, techniques based on modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs) have gained popularity in design optimization for their good performance in sound pressure prediction.
2015-06-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2333
Brandon Sobecki, Patricia Davies, J Stuart Bolton, Frank Eberhardt
Abstract Component sound quality is an important factor in the design of competitive diesel engines. One component noise that causes complaints is the gear rattle that originates in the front-of-engine gear train which drives the fuel pump and other accessories. The rattle is caused by repeated tooth impacts resulting from fluctuations in differential torsional acceleration of the driving gears. These impacts generate a broadband, impulsive noise that is often perceived as annoying. In most previous work, the overall sound quality of diesel engines has been considered without specifically focusing on predicting the perception of gear rattle. Gear rattle level has been quantified based on angular acceleration measurements, but those measurements can be difficult to perform. Here, the emphasis was on developing a metric based on subjective testing of the perception of gear rattle.
2017-10-05
Journal Article
2017-01-9284
Sayan Biswas, Li Qiao
Abstract Gas engines often utilize a small-volume pre-chamber in which fuel is injected at near stoichiometric condition to produce a hot turbulent jet which then ignites the lean mixture in the main chamber. Hot jet ignition has several advantages over traditional spark ignition, e.g., more reliable ignition of extra-lean mixtures and more surface area for ignition resulting in faster burning and improved combustion burn time. Our previous experimental results show that supersonic jets could extend the lean flammability limit of fuel/air mixtures in the main chamber in comparison to subsonic jets. The present paper investigated the characteristics of supersonic hot jets generated by combustion of stoichiometric H2/air in a pre-chamber to understand the ignition mechanism of ultra-lean mixtures by supersonic hot jets.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0511
John Abraham, Shawn D. Givler
It has been shown recently that the maximum penetration of the liquid phase in a vaporizing Diesel spray is relatively short compared to the overall jet penetration and that this maximum is reached in 2 - 4°CA after start of injection. This implies that the drops that are formed by atomization vaporize in a short characteristic time and length relative to other physical processes. This paper addresses an important question related to this observation: Are the vaporizing fuel drops disappearing because they reach a critical state? Related to this question is another: Under what conditions will vaporizing fuel drops reach a critical state in a Diesel engine? Single drops of pure component liquid hydrocarbons and their mixtures vaporizing in quiescent nitrogen or carbon dioxide gas environments with ambient pressures and temperatures at values typically found in Diesel engines are examined.
2001-03-05
Technical Paper
2001-01-1005
Amrita R. Wadhwa, Venkatesh Gopalakrishnan, John Abraham
Multidimensional models are increasingly employed to predict NO and soot emissions from Diesel engines. In the traditional approach, the ensemble-averaged values of variables are employed in the expressions for NO and soot formation and oxidation. In the mixture fraction averaged approach, the values of state variables and species concentrations are obtained from the structure of laminar diffusion flames. The source terms for NO and soot are then obtained by averaging across the mixture fraction coordinate with a probability density function. The clipped-Gaussian probability density function and profiles obtained by employing the OPPDIF code (part of the CHEMKIN package) for the laminar flame structure are employed in this work. The Zeldovich mechanism for NO formation and the Moss et al. formation and Nagle-Strickland-Constable oxidation model for soot have been employed to study the qualitative trends of pollutants in transient combusting Diesel jets.
2001-03-05
Technical Paper
2001-01-0996
M. E. McCracken, J. Abraham
Swirl in Diesel engines is known to be an important parameter that affects the mixing of the fuel jets, heat release, emissions, and overall engine performance. The changes may be brought about through interactions of the swirling flow field with the spray and through modifications of the flow field. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interaction of the swirl with sprays in a Diesel engine through a computational study. A multi-dimensional model for flows, sprays, and combustion in engines is employed. Results from computations are reported with varying levels of swirl and initial turbulence in two typical Diesel engine geometries. It is shown that there is an optimal level of swirl for each geometry that results from a balance between increased jet surface area and, hence, mixing rates and utilization of air in the chamber.
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