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Viewing 1 to 30 of 247
2010-10-19
Journal Article
2010-01-2332
Jorge Sans Sangorrin, Jan Sparbert, Ulrike Ahlrichs, Wolfgang Branz, Oliver Schwindt
Active safety systems will have a great impact in the next generation of vehicles. This is partly originated by the increasing consumer's interest for safety and partly by new traffic safety laws. Control actions in the vehicle are based on an extensive environment model which contains information about relevant objects in vehicle surroundings. Sensor data fusion integrates measurements from different surround sensors into this environment model. In order to avoid system malfunctions, high reliability in the interpretation of the situation, and therefore in the environment model, is essential. Hence, the main idea of data fusion is to make use of the advantages of using multiple sensors and different technologies in order to fulfill these requirements, which are especially high due to autonomous interventions in vehicle dynamics (e. g. automatic emergency braking).
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2249
Matthias Zink, Thorsten Raatz, Thomas Wintrich, Peter Eilts
Environmental and economical reasons have led to an increased interest in the usage of alternative fuels for combustion engines. To clarify the influence of these so-called future fuels on engine performance and emissions it is mandatory to understand their effect on spray formation. Usually this is done by performing various spray experiments with potential future fuels which are available for research purposes today. Due to the multitude of possible future fuels and therefore the uncertainty of their properties and their influence on spray formation a more general approach was chosen in the present study. The possible range of physical properties of future fuels for diesel engines was identified and more than twenty different fluids with representative properties, mostly one-component chemicals, were chosen by means of design of experiment (DoE).
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0125
David Lejsek, Andre Kulzer
The introduction of CO₂-reduction technologies like Start-Stop or the Hybrid-Powertrain and the future emission legislation require a detailed optimization of the engine start-up. The combustion concept development as well as the calibration of the ECU makes an explicit thermodynamic analysis of the combustion process during the start-up necessary. Initially, the well-known thermodynamic analysis of in-cylinder pressure at stationary condition was transmitted to the highly non-stationary engine start-up. There, the current models for calculation of the transient wall heat fluxes were found to be misleading. Therefore, adaptations to the start-up conditions of the known models by Woschni, Hohenberg and Bargende were introduced for calculation of the wall heat transfer coefficient in SI engines with gasoline direct injection. This paper shows how the indicated values can be measured during the engine start-up.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-1270
David Lejsek, Andre Kulzer, Günter Hohenberg, Michael Bargende
The introduction of CO₂-reduction technologies like Start-Stop or the Hybrid-Powertrain and the future emissions limits require a detailed optimization of the engine start-up. The combustion concept development as well as the calibration of the ECU makes an explicit thermodynamic analysis of the combustion process during the start-up necessary. Initially, the well-known thermodynamic analysis of in-cylinder pressure at stationary condition was transmitted to the highly non-stationary engine start-up. There, the current models for calculation of the transient wall heat fluxes were found to be misleading. But with a fraction of nearly 45% of the burned fuel energy, the wall heat is very important for the calculation of energy balance and for the combustion process analysis.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-0891
Sumit Khadilkar, Ahmed Soliman, Peter Schuetzbach, Marko Kustic
Filtration of diesel and gasoline fuel in automotive applications is affected by many external and internal parameters, e.g. vibration, temperature, pressure, flow pulsation, and engine start-stop. Current test procedures for automotive fuel filters, proposed by most of the researchers and organizations including Society for Automotive Engineers (SAE) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO), do not apply the previously mentioned real-world-conditions. These operating conditions, which are typical for an automotive fueling system, have a significant effect on fuel filtration and need to be considered for the accurate assessment of the filter. This requires the development of improved testing procedures that will simulate the operating conditions in a fuel system as encountered in the real world.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0340
M. Kröninger, R. Lahmann, T. Lich, M. Schmid, H. Güttler, T. Huber, K. Williams
This paper describes a new system for early detection of tripped rollover crashes. The main goal of this system is to improve the protection of restraint devices, such as curtain window bags, in these rollover situations. This is achieved by a new rollover sensing (RoSe) algorithm in the airbag controller which produces a very early and robust deployment decision. Based on the analysis of tripped rollover test data, this paper shows how improved rollover sensing performance can be achieved by considering information about the vehicle's driving state before the rollover occurs. The results of this new approach are discussed in terms of deployment times. Finally a combined active and passive safety system architecture for the realization of the approach is suggested.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1490
Heiko Oertel, Oliver Wildner, Klaus Mueller-Haas, Manuel Presti
The study presented in this paper focuses on measures to minimize exhaust gas emissions to meet SULEV targets on a V6 engine by using a cost efficient system configuration. The study consists of three parts. A) In the first stage, the influence of engine management both on raw emissions and catalyst light off performance was optimized. B) Afterwards, the predefined high cell density catalyst system was tested on an engine test bench. In this stage, thermal data and engine out emissions were used for modeling and prediction of light-off performance for further optimized catalyst concepts. C) In the final stage of the program, the emission performance of the test matrix, including high cell density as well as multifunctional single substrate systems, are studied during the FTP cycle. The presented results show the approach to achieve SULEV emission compliance with innovative engine control strategies in combination with a cost effective metallic catalyst design.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1665
Stefan Benz, Elmar Dilger, Werner Dieterle, Klaus D. Müller-Glaser
For the development of future safety-relevant automotive electronic systems a thorough adaptation of the existing design process is necessary to consider safety and reliability in a more systematic way. In this paper an approach for a new design methodology is presented. It is based on the V-Model which is the established process model for the development of electronic and software systems in the automotive domain. For an advanced consideration of safety and reliability the existing process is extended by a second V (with process elements that have a special focus on safety and reliability) to a “Double V”. The new elements are interconnected with the existing ones at several points of time during the development process. By a defined information exchange between the two Vs continuity in the methodology is guaranteed. Basis for the extension are experiences of the aerospace domain that were adopted to automotive conditions.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1270
Thorsten Allgeier, Martin Klenk, Tilo Landenfeld, Enrico Conte, Konstantinos Boulouchos, Jan Czerwinski
In order to meet future requirements for emission reduction and fuel economy a variety of concepts are available for gasoline engines. In the recent past new pathways have been found using alternative fuels and fuel combinations to establish cost optimized solutions. The presented concept for a SI-engine consists of combined injection of gasoline and hydrogen. A hydrogen enriched gas mixture is being injected additionally to gasoline into the engine manifold. The gas composition represents the output of an onboard gasoline reformer. The simulations and measurements show substantial benefits to improve the combustion process resulting in reduced cold start and warm up emissions and optimized part load operation. The replacement of gasoline by hydrogen-rich gas during engine start leads to zero hydrocarbons in the exhaust gas.
2004-10-18
Technical Paper
2004-21-0060
E. K. Liebemann, K. Meder, J. Schuh, G. Nenninger
In spite of improvements in passive safety and efforts to alter driver behavior, the absolute number of highway fatalities in 2002 increased to the highest level since 1990 in the US. ESP is an active safety technology that assists the driver to keep the vehicle on the intended path and thereby helps to prevent accidents. ESP is especially effective in keeping the vehicle on the road and mitigating rollover accidents which account for over 1/3 of all fatalities in single vehicle accidents. In 1995 Bosch was the first supplier to introduce electronic stability control (ESC) for the Mercedes-Benz S-Class sedan. Since then, Bosch has produced more than 10 million systems worldwide which are marketed as ESP - Electronic Stability Program. In this report Bosch will present ESP contributions to active safety and the required adaptations to support four wheel driven vehicles and to mitigate rollover situations.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1604
Bernd Mlekusch, Christoph Wilfling, Ulrike Gröger, Anton Dukart, Frank Mack
Pedestrian protection is an upcoming field for research and development. Active pedestrian protection is described from a system perspective. In this view, the development of an active pedestrian protection system is shown. First an overview on statistics and legal requirements is given and the system requirements are discussed. Sensor concepts and realizations are shown, also different test methods and results are explained. FE-simulations to complete and later replace additional tests are developed, after cross check with the experimental results. In combination with the shown actuator concept this leads to a full functioning active pedestrian protection system.
2013-01-09
Technical Paper
2013-26-0022
Girikumar Kumaresh, Thomas Lich, Jorg Moennich, Andreas Georgi
The 2011 Report of Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, Government of India states that the total accidents with injuries is estimated about 497, 686 out of which the injuries are 511, 394 and fatalities are 142, 485, an average of one fatality per 3.5 [1]. Social losses on account of these crashes are estimated at over Rupees 100 000 Crores annually or 3% of our Gross Domestic Product (GDP) [2]. The irony is that these causalities are rising at 5.9 % annually. India accounts for 10% of the global road crash fatalities. Therefore traffic safety became very important in India. In order to understand the root causes of accidents data is needed in more detail which could be analyzed and points out the major issues to find solutions to stop this trend. Besides vehicle safety, infrastructure related issues and education skills can be derived out of accident data. Official statistics regarding accidents in India are available in national and state wise reports.
2013-10-15
Journal Article
2013-32-9125
Bernd Heinzmann, Simon Scholz, Pramod R, Prashanth Anantha
Fuel economy of two-wheelers is an important factor influencing the purchasing psychology of the consumer within the emerging markets. Additionally, air pollution being a major environmental topic, there is a rising concern about vehicle emissions, especially in the big cities and their metropolitan areas. Potentially, the relatively expensive engine management systems are providing more features and value in comparison to the carburettor counterpart. The combustion system analysis is carried out on a 125 cm3 motorcycle engine and the subsequent numerical simulation comparing the carburettor and the Electronic (Port) Fuel Injection which provides a basis to establish the fuel consumption benefit for the electronic injection systems [1].
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0905
Andre Kulzer, Tobias Nier, Roland Karrelmeyer
Stricter emissions legislation and growing demands for lower fuel consumption require significant efforts to improve combustion efficiency while satisfying the emission quality demands. Controlled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combined with boosted air systems on gasoline engines provides a particularly promising, yet challenging, approach. Naturally aspirated (NA) HCCI has already shown considerable potential in combustion efficiency gains. Nevertheless, since the volumetric efficiency is limited in the NA HCCI operation range due to the hot residuals required to ignite the mixture and slow down reaction kinetics, only part-load operation is feasible in this combustion mode. Considering the future gasoline engine market with growing potentials identified in downsized gasoline engines, it becomes necessary to investigate the synergies and challenges of controlled, boosted HCCI.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1288
Sebastian H. R. Müller, Stefan Arndt, Andreas Dreizler
This study presents measurements of transient flow field and spray structures inside an optically accessible DISI (direct-injection spark-ignition) internal combustion engine. The flow field has a direct effect upon mixture and combustion processes. Given the need to increase the efficiency and performance of modern IC engines and thus reduce emissions a detailed understanding of the flow field is necessary. The method of choice was high-speed two-component particle image velocimetry (PIV) imaging a large field of view (43 x 44 mm₂). To capture the temporal evolution of the main flow features the repetition rate was set to 6 kHz which resolves one image per 1° crank angle (CA) at 1000 rpm. The crank angle range recorded was the latter half of the compression stroke at various engine speeds as well as various charge motions (neutral, tumble and swirl). Moreover, consecutive cycles were recorded allowing a detailed investigation of cycle-to-cycle variations.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1000
Reinhold Hamann, Stefan Kriso, Kyle Williams, Jürgen Klarmann, Jürgen Sauler
The release of ISO 26262 is only about three months after the 2011 World Congress. However, there are still some contentious aspects that can introduce challenges or cause a disproportionate effort. In this paper, we will show how to avoid these problems. ISO 26262 provides a detailed method for classifying the Automotive Safely Integrity Level (ASIL) of in-vehicle electronic systems. However, the ASIL value for a specific function/product can vary significantly across the industry. Applying a lower level than the industry norm can cause substantial liability problems. Applying a higher level can initiate an “arms race” with competitors. This is particularly true if there are no vehicle-related reasons for choosing the higher level or if it doesn't make the product any safer. To encourage international harmonization, this paper will define ASIL classifications for the main automotive components. Most functions/products are currently being developed using parts of existing products.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1034
Mark Costin, Robert Horner, Johannes Jaegers, Dirk Daecke, Alex Grossmann, Bernhard Opitz, Machiel ten Brinke, Tim Tiek, Eric Visser
The SAE J2716 SENT (Single Edge Nibble Transmission) Protocol has entered production with a number of announced products. The SENT protocol is a point-to-point scheme for transmitting signal values from a sensor to a controller. It is intended to allow for high resolution data transmission with a lower system cost than available serial data solution. The SAE SENT Task Force has developed a number of enhancements and clarifications to the original specification which are summarized in this paper.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0442
Thomas Klenk, Peter Kappelmann, Jochen Wiedemann, Ulrich Sailer
The manufacturers of passenger cars increasingly assign development and production of complete subsystems to the supplying industry. A brake system supplier has to give predictions about system quality and performance long time before the first prototypical system is built or even before the supplier gets the order for system development. Nowadays, the usage of computer-aided system design and simulation is essential for that task. This article presents a tool designed to support the development process. A special focus will be on how to define quality. A formal definition of quality is provided, illustrated and motivated by two examples.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0581
M. Lasa, H.-M. Heinkel, E. Moser, R. Rothfuß
Virtual prototyping and concurrent engineering is becoming a common practice due to time and cost constraints in automotive industry. Analysing interaction of mechatronic systems consisting of control and multiple physical domains becomes a major challenge for the product design due to the domain specific representations. In this respect, model exchange between different domains is essential. The design of the Common Rail injection system exposes all these deficiencies. On the example of the virtual prototyping of the Common Rail system, this paper gives a pragmatic approach to overcome the problem of model exchange. Hereby, the standardised simulation language VHDL-AMS is explicitly used as a unified basis.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0717
Wolfgang Hermsen, Karl Joachim Neumann
In recent times, the software portion and the complexity of software within automotive electronic control units have grown noticeably and continue to grow. In order to get a grip on the software complexity and the amount of customer-specific software variants, a modeling concept for a structured and easily extensible software architecture is needed. This concept should efficiently support the formation of variants and code reuse without increasing runtime and memory space overhead. In this paper, we present our approach to such a modeling concept: The object-oriented modeling concept OMOS and its application to signal conditioning of vehicle control systems.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0822
Werner Harter, Wolfgang Pfeiffer, Peter Dominke, Gerhard Ruck, Peter Blessing
Additional future requirements for automobiles such as improved vehicle dynamics control, enhanced comfort, increased safety and compact packaging are met by modern electrical steering systems. Based on these requirements the new functionality is realized by various additional electrical components for measuring, signal processing and actuator control. However, the reliability of these new systems has to meet the standard of today's automotive steering products. To achieve the demands of the respective components (e.g. sensors, bus systems, electronic control units, power units, actuators) the systems have to be fault-tolerant and/or fail-silent. The realization of the derived safety structures requires both expertise and experience in design and mass production of safety relevant electrical systems. Beside system safety and system availability the redundant electrical systems also have to meet economic and market requirements.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0171
Jan Lichtermann, Rod Pettit
Until now, the use of biometric systems has not been in the public eye. The high cost of sensors and processing has meant that biometrics was previously restricted to high security access, financial transaction and law enforcement applications. However, as a result of improvements in technology, biometric sensor price and reliability have achieved levels where biometrics is being seriously considered for automotive systems. This paper introduces the field of biometrics, the key terms and processes. Fingerprint Technology and Identification by Fingerprint are discussed, as are the use and applicability of biometrics in automotive applications, including Personal Profiling, Keyless Engine Start and vehicle access authorization. The key findings of investigations over the last years are discussed.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0387
Jens Weber, Fabio Peruzzi
In the automotive industry, a steadily growing number of mono-functional electronic control units (ECUs) with increasing complexity on the one hand and restrictive requirements for power consumption and mounting space on the other hand are forcing an architectural change in car electronics. Computer platforms with a client/server architecture could potentially reduce the number of ECUs in a car drastically, with a commensurate reduction of costs and space, better integration possibilities for enhanced functionality and additional services during the lifetime of a car. One of the problems which arises when those architectures come to the car is coping with the complexity of mainly software-based functionality and reliability issues under the aspect of rapidly evolving hardware infrastructure. The reorganization of car electronics also offers the possibility of a redistribution of functionality in the car which has been designed in the past for specific demands.
2011-11-08
Journal Article
2011-32-0557
Frank Schuerg, André Kulzer, Andreas Kufferath, K. Manikandan, Peter Roth
Environmental consciousness and tightening emissions legislation push the market share of electronic fuel injection within a dynamically growing world wide small engines market. Similar to automotive engines during late 1980's, this opens up opportunities for original equipment manufacturers (OEM) and suppliers to jointly advance small engines performance in terms of fuel economy, emissions, and drivability. In this context, advanced combustion system analyses from automotive engine testing have been applied to a typical production motorcycle small engine. The 125cc 4-stroke, 2-valve, air-cooled, single-cylinder engine with closed-loop lambda-controlled electronic port fuel injection was investigated in original series configuration on an engine dynamometer. The test cycle fuel consumption simulation provides reasonable best case fuel economy estimates based on stationary map fuel consumption measurements.
2011-10-06
Technical Paper
2011-28-0021
Balaji. R, Balasubramaniam. V, John Alex D'cruz, Falco Sengebusch, Stefan Tumback
With the development of start stop technology to improve fuel economy and to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, the information of State of Charge (SOC) of the battery is highly desirable. Recent days the battery sensors are used in mid-segment and luxury automobiles that monitors the current, voltage and temperature of the battery and calculates the charge model and sends the information via CAN or LIN. These dedicated sensors are intended to perform various functions other than basic start stop. Hence these sensors are proven to be expensive for emerging market, which is intended to perform only basic start stop as the market is looking for a low cost solution. Bosch- India has developed and implemented a novel idea of bringing a low cost and reliable battery charge detection algorithm that can be realized within the Electronic Control Unit (ECU) without a dedicated sensor.
2011-10-04
Technical Paper
2011-36-0196
Paulo Gomes, Rainer Ecker, Andre Kulzer, Andreas Kufferath, Ederson Conti
The stricter worldwide emission legislation and growing demands for lower fuel consumption and CO2-emission require for significant efforts to improve combustion efficiency while satisfying the emission quality demands. Ethanol fuel combined with boosting on direct injection gasoline engines provides a particularly promising and, at the same time, a challenging approach. Brazil is one of the main Ethanol fuel markets with its E24 and E100 fuel availability, which covers a large volume of the national needs. Additionally, worldwide Ethanol availability is becoming more and more important, e.g., in North America and Europe. Considering the future flex-fuel engine market with growing potentials identified on downsized spark ignition engines, it becomes necessary to investigate the synergies and challenges of Ethanol boosted operation. Main topic of the present work focuses on the operation of Ethanol blends up to E100 at high loads up to 30 bar imep.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1281
Andreas Bauer, Manfred Broy, Jan Romberg, Bernhard Schätz, Peter Braun, Ulrich Freund, Nuria Mata, Robert Sandner, Dirk Ziegenbein
This paper describes the first results from the AutoMoDe project (Automotive Model-based Development), where an integrated methodology for model-based development of automotive control software is being developed. The results presented include a number of problem-oriented graphical notations, based on a formally defined operational model, which are associated with system views for various degrees of abstraction. It is shown how the approach can be used for partitioning comprehensive system designs for subsequent implementation-related tasks. Recent experiences from a case study of an engine management system, specific issues related to reengineering, and the current status of CASE-tool support are also presented.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0037
Sascha Klett, Manfred Piesche, Stefan Heinzelmann, Helmut Weyl, Hans-Martin Wiedenmann, Uwe Schneider, Lothar Diehl, Harald Neumann
Modern zirconia oxygen sensors are heated internally to achieve an optimal detection of the oxygen concentration in the exhaust gas and fast light off time. The temperature of the gas in the exhaust pipe varies in a wide range. The zirconia sensor is cooled by radiation and forced convection caused by cold exhaust gas. If the zirconia temperature falls, the oxygen detection capability of the sensor decreases. To minimize the cooling effects, protection tubes cover the zirconia sensor. However, this is in conflict with the aim to accelerate the dynamics of the lambda sensor. In this paper, the heat transfer at the surface of a heated planar zirconia sensor with two different double protection tubes of a Bosch oxygen sensor is examined in detail. The geometric configuration of the tubes forces different flow patterns in the inner protection tube around the zirconia sensor. The zirconia sensor is internally electrically heated by a platinum heater layer.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0053
Haris Hamedović, Franz Raichle, Jörg Breuninger, Wolfgang Fischer, Werner Dieterle, Martin Klenk, Johann F. Böhme
In order to optimize the performance and emission of engines, advanced control and diagnostic systems require detailed feedback information about the combustion process. In this context, cost-effective solutions are of interest. The contribution describes a method for reconstructing cylinder-individual features of each combustion cycle by processing the instantaneous fluctuations of the engine speed and the in-cylinder pressure of one cylinder. Model-based torque estimation, analyzing both of the signals simultaneously, provides an accurate estimation of the mean indicated pressure. Using this method, a new algorithm for advanced misfire detection is presented. Furthermore, a new pressure model with a feasible number of parameters is proposed. It is combined with the torque estimation in order to reconstruct the unknown pressure traces of the cylinders not equipped with sensors.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1530
Vasco Vollmer, Michael Busse, Alexander Weber, Arne Zender, Klaus Jobmann
The amount of software integrated into today's vehicles growths exponential and tends to be a patchwork of non interrelated applications. However the interrelationship gets more and more intensive as applications start to cooperate and therefore communicate with each other. By introducing a domain exceeding middleware concept we want applications to experience a high level of integration and enable outsourcing of features applications have in common.
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