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Viewing 1 to 30 of 95
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2274
Chinmaya Patil, Michael olson, Benjamin Morris, Clark Fortune, Bapiraju Surampudi, Joe Redfield, Heather Gruenewald
A simulation framework with a validated system model capable of estimating fuel consumption is a valuable tool in analysis and design of the hybrid vehicles. In particular, the framework can be used for (1) benchmarking the fuel economy achievable from alternate hybrid powertrain technologies, (2) investigating sensitivity of fuel savings with respect to design parameters (for example, component sizing), and (3) evaluating the performance of various supervisory control algorithms for energy management. This paper describes such a simulation framework that can be used to predict fuel economy of series hydraulic hybrid vehicle for any specified driver demand schedule (drive cycle), developed in MATLAB/Simulink. The key components of the series hydraulic hybrid vehicle are modeled using a combination of first principles and empirical data. A simplified driver model is included to follow the specified drive cycle.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0404
Riccardo Meldolesi, George Bailey, Clive Lacy, Ian Gilbert, Jean-Pierre Pirault, Anthony Perkins
The Scuderi internal combustion engine is characterized by a split cycle that divides the four strokes of a conventional combustion cycle over two paired cylinders, one intake/compression cylinder and one power/exhaust cylinder, connected by a crossover port. This split cycle also has an additional high pressure “crossover” gas transfer phase versus the conventional 4-stroke cycle, during which the charge air is moved from the first to the second cylinder. The intake/compression, power/exhaust and crossover events are repeated every revolution, i.e. over two cycles, with a small phase angle between the two cylinders. The separate cylinders enable opportunities for improved combustion and the possibility for pneumatic hybridization of the engine. This paper describes the technical challenges posed by the actuation of the crossover valves in the Scuderi Split Cycle research engine.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1575
Zainal Abidin, Kaushik Das, Charles Roberts
The presented work describes how numerical modeling techniques were extended to simulate a full Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) NOx aftertreatement system. Besides predicting ammonia-to-NOX ratio (ANR) and uniformity index (UI) at the SCR inlet, the developed numerical model was able to predict NOx reduction and ammonia slip. To reduce the calculation time due to the complexity of the chemical process and flow field within the SCR, a semi-1D approach was developed and applied to model the SCR catalyst, which was subsequently coupled with a 3D model of the rest of the exhaust system. Droplet depletion of urea water solution (UWS) was modeled by vaporization and thermolysis techniques while ammonia generation was modeled by the thermolysis and hydrolysis method. Test data of two different SCR systems were used to calibrate the simulation results. Results obtained using the thermolysis method showed better agreement with test data compared to the vaporization method.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1204
Manfred Amann, Daniel Ouwenga
Abstract As boosted, direct injected gasoline engines become more prevalent in the automotive market, the boosting system architecture and efficiency are intimately entwined with the efficiency and performance of the engine. Single-stage as well as two-stage boosting systems, comprising of either two turbochargers or a supercharger in combination with a turbocharger, are potential configurations. When combining an internal combustion engine with boosting hardware, a mechanical, fluid-dynamic and thermodynamic coupling is created and the system as a whole will need to be treated as such.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1886
Robert Zalosh, Nathan Weyandt
A fire exposure test was conducted on a 72.4 liter composite (Type HGV-4) hydrogen fuel tank at an initial hydrogen pressure of 34.3 MPa (ca 5000 psi). No Pressure Relief Device was installed on the tank to ensure catastrophic failure for analysis. The cylinder ruptured at 35.7 MPa after a 370 kW fire exposure for 6 min 27 seconds. Blast wave pressures measured along a line perpendicular to the cylinder axis were 18% to 25% less the values calculated from ideal blast wave correlations using a blast energy of 13.4 MJ, which is based on the ideal gas internal energy at the 35.7 MPa burst pressure. The resulting hydrogen fireball maximum diameter of 7.7 m is about 19% less than the value predicted from existing correlations using the 1.64 kg hydrogen mass in the tank.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-1231
Christopher James Chadwell, Mark Walls
The VanDyne SuperTurbocharger (SuperTurbo) is a turbocharger with an integral Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). By changing the gear ratio of the CVT, the SuperTurbo is able to either pull power from the crankshaft to provide a supercharging function, or to function as a turbo-compounder, where energy is taken from the turbine and given to the crankshaft. The SuperTurbo's supercharger function enhances the transient response of a downsized and turbocharged engine, and the turbo-compounding function offers the opportunity to extract the available exhaust energy from the turbine rather than opening a waste gate. Using 1-D simulation, it was shown that a 2.0-liter L4 could exceed the torque curve of a 3.2L V6 using a SuperTurbo, and meet the torque curve of a 4.2-liter V8 with a SuperTurbo and a fresh-air bypass configuration. In each case, the part-load efficiency while using the SuperTurbo was better than the baseline engine.
2009-11-02
Technical Paper
2009-01-2717
Bapi Surampudi, Ashok Nedungadi, Gregory Ostrowski, Alan Montemayor, Heather Gruenewald
Hybrid hydraulic power trains are a natural fit for heavy duty vehicle applications due to their high power density. This paper describes the analytical formulae available for sizing a series hybrid hydraulic vehicle without changing the engine size. Sizing of pump, accumulator and motor are addressed specifically. A control strategy is also suggested for operating the engine and powertrain pressure close to the best efficiency zones. An example is then given using an FMTV (Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles) platform with a CAT C7 engine. Simulation results are generated using VPSET (Vehicle Propulsion Systems Evaluation Tool), an SwRI-developed vehicle modeling and simulation tool. The hydraulic components are sized according to the recommendations in this paper. The suggested control strategy is implemented in VPSET and performance of the series hydraulic hybrid configuration is compared with that of a conventional powertrain.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0875
Sudhakar Das, Charles E. Roberts
A large amount of the heat generated during the engine combustion process is lost to the coolant system through the surrounding metal parts. Therefore, there is a potential to improve the overall cycle efficiency by reducing the amount of heat transfer from the engine. In this paper, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool has been used to evaluate the effects of a number of design and operating variables on total heat loss from an engine to the coolant system. These parameters include injection characteristics and orientation, shape of the piston bowl, percentage of EGR and material property of the combustion chamber. Comprehensive analyses have been presented to show the efficient use of the heat retained in the combustion chamber and its contribution to improve thermal efficiency of the engine. Finally, changes in design and operating parameters have been suggested based on the analytical results to improve heat loss reduction from an engine.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-0605
Brian David Dykas, Denise M. Rizzo, Doug Fussner, Randy McDonnell, Mark Riggs
A dynamometer test methodology was developed for evaluation of HMMWV axle efficiency with hypoid gearsets, comparing those having various degrees of superfinish versus new production axles as well as used axles removed at depot maintenance. To ensure real-world applicability, a HMMWV variant vehicle model was created and simulated over a peacetime vehicle duty cycle, which was developed to represent a mission scenario. In addition, tractive effort calculations were then used to determine the maximum input torques. The drive cycle developed above was modified into two different profiles having varying degrees of torque variability to determine if the degree of variability would have a significant influence on efficiency in the transient dynamometer tests. Additionally, steady state efficiency performance is measured at four input pinion speeds from 700-2500 rpm, five input torques from 50 - 400 N⋅m, and two sump temperatures, 80°C and 110°C.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0342
Manfred Amann, Darius Mehta, Terrence Alger
Downsizing is an important concept to reduce fuel consumption as well as emissions of spark ignition engines. Engine displacement is reduced in order to shift operating points from lower part load into regions of the operating map with higher efficiency and thus lower specific fuel consumption [ 1 ]. Since maximum power in full load operation decreases due to the reduction of displacement, engines are boosted (turbocharging or supercharging), which leads to a higher specific loading of the engines. Hence, a new combustion phenomenon has been observed at high loads and low engine speed and is referred to as Low-Speed Pre-Ignition or LSPI. In cycles with LSPI, the air/fuel mixture is ignited prior to the spark which results in the initial flame propagation quickly transforming into heavy engine knock. Very high pressure rise rates and peak cylinder pressures could exceed design pressure limits, which in turn could lead to degradation of the engine.
2012-09-24
Journal Article
2012-01-1979
Shinhyuk Michael Joo, Terrence Alger, Christopher Chadwell, William De Ojeda, Jacob Zuehl, Raphael Gukelberger
A 13 L HD diesel engine was converted to run as a flame propagation engine using the HEDGE™ Dual-Fuel concept. This concept consists of pre-mixed gasoline ignited by a small amount of diesel fuel - i.e., a diesel micropilot. Due to the large bore size and relatively high compression ratio for a pre-mixed combustion engine, high levels of cooled EGR were used to suppress knock and reduce the engine-out emissions of the oxides of nitrogen and particulates. Previous work had indicated that the boosting of high dilution engines challenges most modern turbocharging systems, so phase I of the project consisted of extensive simulation efforts to identify an EGR configuration that would allow for high levels of EGR flow along the lug curve while minimizing pumping losses and combustion instabilities from excessive backpressure. A potential solution that provided adequate BTE potential was consisted of dual loop EGR systems to simultaneously flow high pressure and low pressure loop EGR.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0419
David Branyon, Dean Simpson
The Scuderi engine is a split cycle design that divides the four strokes of a conventional combustion cycle over two paired cylinders, one intake/compression cylinder and one power/exhaust cylinder, connected by a crossover port. This configuration provides potential benefits to the combustion process, as well as presenting some challenges. A Miller cycle configuration of the engine is made possible by turbocharging with a downsized compressor cylinder and has been modeled in 1-dimensional cycle simulation software.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-1077
Gordon J. Bartley, Christopher J. Chadwell, Theodore M. Kostek, Reggie Zhan
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts are used to reduce NOx emissions from internal combustion engines in a variety of applications. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) performed an Internal Research & Development project to study SCR catalyst thermal deactivation. The study included a V/W/TiO₂ formulation, a Cu-zeolite formulation and a Fe-zeolite formulation. This work describes NH₃ storage capacity measurement data as a function of aging time and temperature. Addressing one objective of the work, these data can be used in model-based control algorithms to calculate the current NH₃ storage capacity of an SCR catalyst operating in the field, based on time and temperature history. The model-based control then uses the calculated value for effective DEF control and prevention of excessive NH₃ slip. Addressing a second objective of the work, accelerated thermal aging of SCR catalysts may be achieved by elevating temperatures above normal operating temperatures.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-1297
Sudhakar Das, Kaushik Das, Zainal Abidin, Darius Mehta
A Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system is a simple solution to mitigate high concentration of nitrogen oxides from tail pipe emissions using ammonia as catalyst. In recent years, implementation of stringent emission standards for diesel exhaust made the SCR system even more lucrative aftertreatment solution for diesel engine manufacturer due to its well established reaction mechanism and lower initial cost involved compared to other available options. Nitrogen oxides reduction efficiency and ammonia slip are two main parameters that affects SCR system performance. Therefore, primary design objective of an efficient SCR system is to enhance reduction of nitrogen oxides and control ammonia slip. Both these factors can be improved by having a uniform mixture of ammonia at the SCR inlet. In this mathematical simulation, various parameters that affect accuracy in predicting the uniformity of mixture at the SCR inlet have been documented.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920482
Rob H. Thring
This paper describes the results of using the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) engine friction model to examine the effects of changing certain design parameters on the friction of a gasoline engine. The paper gives the results of an examination of the effects of changing the main and cam-shaft bearing aspect ratio on the friction of those bearings, and the effect of the tension of the piston rings, and the gas loading on them. The model predicts that the friction of the piston rings is the highest single component in the friction, except at high engine speeds, where the predicted windage was greater. Next, after the piston rings, was the piston skirt friction. The remaining components were relatively small, and in order of importance were the accessories, the cam bearing friction, cam/tappet friction, the main bearing, the crank pin, and oscillatory friction in the valve train, in that order.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920185
James A. Schwalb, Thomas W. Ryan
In-cylinder control of particulate emissions in a diesel engine depends on careful control and understanding of the fuel injection and air/fuel mixing process. It is extremely difficult to measure physical parameters of the injection and mixing process in an operating engine, but it is possible to simulate some diesel combustion chamber conditions in a steady flow configuration whose characteristics can be more easily probed. This program created a steady flow environment in which air-flow and injection sprays were characterized under non-combusting conditions, and emissions measurements were made under combusting conditions. A limited test matrix was completed in which the following observations were made. Grid-generated air turbulence decreased particulates, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons, while CO2 and NOx levels were increased. The turbulence accelerated combustion, resulting in more complete combustion and higher temperatures at the measurement location.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920194
Gerhard Knothe, Marvin O. Bagby, Thomas W. Ryan, Timothy J. Callahan, Herbert G. Wheeler
Vegetable oils are candidates for alternative fuels in diesel engines. These oils, such as soybean, sunflower, rapeseed, cottonseed, and peanut, consist of various triglycerides. The chemistry of the degradation of vegetable oils when used as alternate diesel fuels thus corresponds to that of triglycerides. To study the chemistry occurring during the precombustion phase of a vegetable oil injected into a diesel engine, a reactor simulating a diesel engine was constructed. Pure triglycerides were injected into the reactor in order to determine differences in the precombustion behavior of the various triglycerides. The reactor allowed motion pictures to be prepared of the injection event as the important reaction parameters, such as pressure, temperature, and atmosphere were varied. Furthermore, samples of the degradation products of precombusted triglycerides were collected and analyzed (gas chromatography / mass spectrometry).
1997-10-01
Technical Paper
972872
Gary B. Bessee, Douglas M. Yost, Paul I. Lacey, Keith L. Lilly, Gordon Jones, David Becktel, Michael S. Paar, Steve Davis, Keith Brenske, Marty Barris, Roger Miller, William Needelman, David Hodgkins, Paul Henderson, Lorin Dueck
A cooperative research and development program was organized to determine the critical particle size of abrasive debris that will cause significant wear in rotary injection fuel pumps. Various double-cut test dusts ranging from 0-5 to 10-20 μm were evaluated to determine which caused the pumps to fail. With the exception of the 0-5-μm test dust, all other test dust ranges evaluated caused failure in the rotary injection pumps. After preliminary testing, it was agreed that the 4-8-μm test dust would be used for further testing. Analysis revealed that the critical particle size causing significant wear is 6-7 μm. This is a smaller abrasive particle size than reported in previously published literature. A rotary injection pump evaluation methodology was developed. During actual operation, the fuel injection process creates a shock wave that propagates back up the fuel line to the fuel filter.
1997-10-01
Technical Paper
972838
P. I. Lacey, K. B. Kohl, L. L. Stavinoha, R. M. Estefan
The performance of modern spark ignition engines with electronically controlled fuel injection systems may be adversely affected by formation of deposits around the intake valve. The rate of deposit formation is sensitive to fuel composition and boiling point distribution, as well as engine design and operating conditions. Deposit control additives are available, and full-scale engine and vehicle tests have been developed to rate fuel deposition characteristics. However, the expense associated with full-scale testing, combined with the many variables affecting repeatability, create a need for a well controlled laboratory-scale bench test. This paper describes the development of both the test apparatus and methodology to accurately reproduce the conditions present at the intake valve of an operating engine.
1996-10-01
Technical Paper
962060
Lee G. Dodge, Douglas M. Leone, David W. Naegeli, Daniel W. Dickey, Kendall R. Swenson
A menu-driven, PC-based model, ALAMO_ENGINE, has been developed to predict the nitrogen oxides (NOx) reductions in direct-injected, diesel engines due to exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), emulsified fuels, manifold or in-cylinder water injection, fuel injection timing changes, humidity effects, and intake air temperature changes. The approach was to use a diesel engine cycle simulation with detailed gas composition calculations for the intake and exhaust gases (including EGR, water concentration, fuel-type effects, etc.), coupled with a code to calculate stoichiometric, adiabatic flame temperatures and expressions that correlate measured NOx emissions with the flame temperature. Execution times are less than 10 seconds on a 486-66 MHz PC.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970552
Xiaojian Tao, Martin B. Treuhaft
System contamination caused by contaminates or small particles built-in, self-generated, or inhaled from environment presents severe problems. The problems include but are not limited to the malfunctioning of valves, pumps, seals and injectors or lock-up of these components; increased wear of bearings, piston rings, and other friction components; and degradated machine performance. In general, system contamination changes a deterministic system into a stochastic system and shortens machinery service life. In this paper, these contamination problems are discussed in categories and associated analysis, testing and computer modeling methodologies are also discussed.
1993-09-01
Technical Paper
932429
James J. Polonis, William H. McGinnis, Ismael Martinez
Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) design considerations have a vital role in the proper functioning of the electronic circuits and systems of a modern off-highway vehicle (OHV). Careful planning is needed in developing the electronic systems that operate the various functions and tasks on these vehicles. Incorporation of EMC in a system design gives that system the quality of reliability; that is, the system will have reduced emissions and be less susceptible to radiated and conducted electromagnetic energy. This paper provides ideas, concepts, and guidelines that the designer of OHV control circuitry can use for incorporation of EMC at the beginning of a design project.
1993-10-01
Technical Paper
932735
Thomas W. Ryan, Jimell Erwin
Four broad boiling range materials, representative of current and future feedstocks for diesel fuel, were processed to two levels of sulfur and aromatic content. These materials were then distilled into six to eight fractions each. The resulting 63 fuels were then characterized physically and chemically, and tested in both a constant volume combustion apparatus and a single cylinder diesel engine. The data obtained from these analyses and tests have been analyzed graphically and statistically. The results of the initial statistical analysis, reported here, indicate that the ignition quality of a fuel is dependent not only on the overall aromatic content, but also on the composition of the material formed during hydroprocessing of the aromatics. The NOx emissions, however, are related mainly to the aromatic content of the fuel, and the structure of the aromatic material.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950818
Stanley K. Widener
The design of helical Intake ports for swirl generation is a process that has been developed over a number of years through primarily empirical methods. A number of design rules have been established that enable designers to develop ports that approach the state-of-the-art for maximum swirl generation with minimum pressure loss. More recently, computer-aided design (CAD) tools have been introduced that permit geometry and features to be accurately defined by mathematical surface descriptions, and to be parameterized such that derived geometry is updated automatically along with parent features. The author has developed a parametric design approach for helical ports that incorporates the lessons learned from experience into a systematic design procedure. This procedure takes advantage of the current CAD capabilities to expedite the design process and improve the result.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950806
Nigel F. Gale, Stanley K. Widener, Ping C. Sui, Houshun Zhang
Computer based analytical design techniques are transforming the engine design process. Analytical tools allow faster and more accurate design optimization. The design process is also shortened because the electronic transfer of files permits the design to be worked concurrently by engineers working with different analysis packages or on various parts of the design. Prototype parts and tooling can be made directly from the Computer-Aided Design (CAD) by various rapid prototyping methods. The analytical design techniques can also permit a highly optimized design with less possibility of corrections being necessary in the development stages. This paper reviews these new design techniques and examines how they can be used to improve the design technique. The following design tools are discussed.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950708
Ping C. Sui, Tony Y. Torng
Life prediction and reliability analysis of a cam roller system were investigated. From the tribological analysis, the cam roller system was found to operate under low film parameter conditions and components were subjected to the risk of contact fatigue. Surface analysis performed on the failed rollers indicated that the surface distress was the primary cause for failure. Then, numerical analyses were performed to evaluate the cam roller life and its related reliability. The adopted approach combined a contact fatigue crack growth calculations with a probabilistic model for controlling the design uncertainty. The computation-efficient Fast Probabilistic Integration (FPI™) code was used to solve the problem. With appropriate descriptions for uncertainty distributions, the surface fatigue life of the specified cam roller system can be predicted along with a confident reliability level.
1994-11-01
Technical Paper
942274
Joseph J. Greenbaum, Michael A. Kluger, Barry E. Westmoreland
This paper presents a discussion on manual transmission torque losses and focuses specifically on the relationship between torque loss, input speed and torque. It also includes a discussion on other factors affecting torque loss, such as inclination angle and lube oil temperature. Manual transmissions used in compact light truck applications have torque losses that are a function of input speed and torque. Efficiency studies done on manual transmissions in the engine-driving mode indicate that torque losses, in other than direct-drive gears, are considerably more dependent on input torque than input speed. It was also observed that efficiency was significantly affected by the inclination angle and lube oil temperature.
1996-02-01
Technical Paper
960077
Houshun Zhang, Stanley K. Widener
Due to compressibility, reactivity, evaporation and mixing, the gas species concentration varies significantly along the intake and exhaust pipes of an engine. An understanding of this behavior is vital to correctly predict catalyst performance because the behavior of a catalyst very much depends on the instantaneous local species concentrations, rather than those in the cylinder. Also, knowing this behavior is more important to assess the effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). The objective of this research is to develop a tool that is capable of predicting the instantaneous species concentration throughout the entire intake and exhaust system, and to lay out a foundation to model catalysts in the near future. This is done by first developing a complete engine cycle simulation model that is able to accurately predict wave dynamics in the piping system. Then, species tracking is accomplished by solving the species conservation equations.
1995-11-01
Technical Paper
952585
Cherian Olikara, Joe Steiber, S. M. Shahed
Heavy duty trucks account for about 50 percent of the NOx burden in urban areas and consume about 20 percent of the national transportation fuel in the United States. There is a continuing need to reduce emissions and fuel consumption. Much of the focus of current work is on engine development as a stand-alone subsystem. While this has yielded impressive gains so far, further improvement in emissions or engine efficiency is unlikely in a cost effective manner. Consequently, an integrated approach looking at the whole powertrain is required. A computer model of the heavy duty truck system was built and evaluated. The model includes both conventional and hybrid powertrains. It uses a series of interacting sub-models for the vehicle, transmission, engine, exhaust aftertreatment and braking energy recovery/storage devices. A specified driving cycle is used to calculate the power requirements at the wheels and energy flow and inefficiencies throughout the drivetrain.
1995-11-01
Technical Paper
952591
John Bradley, Larry Eckhardt, Frank Sonzala
An Automatic Tire Inflation System (ATIS), specifically designed for use on commercial long haul trailers underwent complete testing and evaluation in 1993/1994.1 Testing and evaluation included a field test of a prototype system and a controlled laboratory evaluation of the Rotary Union which is the only component subject to wear. The testing of the prototype system indicated that design improvements were necessary before the system could be installed in fleet operations. The design improvements were completed and field installation of production ATIS began. The design improvements were intended to improve overall system durability, decrease installation time, to have less effect on the axle structure than the original design, implement the use of SAE or DOT Approved pressure components and increase overall dependability of the system. ATIS systems have now been developed and tested for most domestic trailer axle configurations.
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