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Viewing 1 to 11 of 11
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0314
Larry Michaels, Curtis G. Adams, Michael Juskiewicz
Abstract A simulation approach is defined that integrates a military mission assessment tool (One Semi-Automated Forces) with a commercial automotive control/energy consumption development tool (Autonomie). The objective is to enable vehicle energy utilization and fuel consumption impact assessments relative to US Army mission effectiveness and commercial drive cycles. The approach to this integration will be described, along with its potential to meet its objectives.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0308
Tomasz A. Haupt, Angela E. Card, Matthew Doude, Michael S. Mazzola, Scott Shurin, Alan Hufnagel
Abstract The Powertrain Analysis and Computational Environment (PACE) is a forward-looking powertrain simulation tool that is ready for a High-Performance Computing (HPC) environment. The code, written in C++, is one actor in a comprehensive ground vehicle co-simulation architecture being developed by the CREATE-GV program. PACE provides an advanced behavioral modeling capability for the powertrain subsystem of a conventional or hybrid-electric vehicle that exploits the idea of reusable vehicle modeling that underpins the Autonomie modeling environment developed by the Argonne National Laboratory. PACE permits the user to define a powertrain in Autonomie, which requires a single desktop license for MATLAB/Simulink, and port it to a cluster computer where PACE runs with an open-source BSD-3 license so that it can be distributed to as many nodes as needed.
2012-02-10
Article
A TARDEC team has been working with a suspension OEM to assess the possible improvement and feasibility of integrating a magneto-rheological semi-active damper suspension into the Stryker Family of Vehicles.
2012-10-01
Article
Gentherm has received a $1.55 million contract modification from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to apply the technology in its thermoelectric generator (TEG) for passenger cars to a similar program for heavy vehicles.
2008-06-23
Article
As the amount of diagnostic data grows, product designers and marketers who plan for the future want to let maintenance personnel predict when failures are imminent. Prognostics is becoming feasible now that all types of information is available. Once developers correlate sensor data with real-world wear patterns and failure modes, they can use that information to alert owners and operators when breakdowns are expected.
2010-03-04
Article
Scientists at the U.S. Army Tank Automotive, Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) have been awarded military funding to develop technology that could enable “smart-armor” vehicles that tell occupants when damage has occurred.
2010-03-04
Article
Alcoa has been appointed by the U.S. Army Tank Automotive, Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) to collaborate on the Army’s Fuel-Efficient Ground Vehicle Demonstrator (FED) project. In partnership with Ricardo Inc., Alcoa Defense will produce a tactical wheeled vehicle structure with the aim of significantly improving fuel efficiency while maintaining survivability, performance, and payload capability.
2017-03-30
Article
The Army hopes a new streamlined development and procurement process will facilitate aid from the automotive sector to design the next generation of combat vehicles.
2017-07-14
Article
Connectivity, automation and electrification: Three inexorable trends that will largely drive on- and off-highway vehicle developments in the coming years, according to industry experts presenting keynotes at the revamped 2017 SAE COMVEC event. And with greater connectivity comes greater cyber concerns, they warn.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2751
Igor Baseski, Kenneth Norman, David Ryan, Stefanie Stahara
Abstract The United States Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) built systems to measure the suspension parameters, center of gravity, and moments of inertia of wheeled vehicles. This is part of an ongoing effort to model and predict vehicle dynamic behavior. The new machines, the Suspension Parameter Identification and Evaluation Rig (SPIdER) and the Vehicle Inertia Parameter Evaluation Rig (VIPER), have sufficient capacity to cover most heavy, wheeled vehicles. The SPIdER operates by holding the vehicle sprung mass nominally fixed while hydraulic cylinders move an “axle frame” in bounce or roll under each axle being tested. Up to two axles may be tested at once. Vertical forces at the tires, displacements of the wheel centers in three dimensions, and steer and camber angles are measured.
2017-08-03
Article
Engineers are adding sensors, more powerful micros and faster networks as they automate tasks and pave the way to autonomy.
Viewing 1 to 11 of 11