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Viewing 1 to 30 of 167
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0521
Landon Onyebueke, Akindeji Ojetola, Edward Winkler
This paper presents a PC based mathematical and rapid prototyping technique for anthropometric accommodation in a maintenance environment using the principle of simulation based design. The developed technique is capable of analyzing anthropometric data using multivariate (Principal component Analysis) approach to describe the body size variability of any given population. A number of body size representative cases are established which, when used properly within the constraints of the maintenance environments, will ensure the accommodation of a desired percentage of a population. This technique evaluates the percentage accommodation of a given population for the environment using the specific manikin cases as boundary conditions. In the case where any member of a maintenance crew cannot be accommodated, the technique has the capability of informing the designer of the environment why the member(s) is/are not accommodated.
2004-07-19
Technical Paper
2004-01-2326
William Atwell, Lawrence W. Townsend, Thomas Miller, Christina Campbell
The highly successful Galileo mission made a number of startling and remarkable discoveries during its eight-year tour in the harsh Jupiter radiation environment. Two of these revelations were: 1) salty oceans lying under an icy crust of the Galilean moons: Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, and 2) the possible existence or remnants of life, especially on Europa, which has a very tenuous atmosphere of oxygen. Galileo radiation measurement data from the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) have been used (Garrett et al., 2003) to update the trapped electron environment model, GIRE: Galileo Interim Radiation Environment, in the range of L (L: McIlwain parameter – see ref. 6) = 8–16 Rj (Rj: radius of Jupiter ≈ 71,400 km) with plans to extend the model for both electrons and protons as more data are reduced and analyzed.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0806
Akindeji Ojetola, Landon Onyebueke, Edward Winkler
Jet fighter missions have been known to last extended period of time. The need for a comfortable and safe seat has become paramount considering that fact that uncomfortable seats can lead to numerous health issues. Several health effects like numbness, pressure sore, low back pain, and vein thrombosis have been associated with protracted sitting. The cushion, and of late the installation rail angle are the only components of the ejection seat system that can be modified to reduce these adverse effects. A comprehensive static comfort evaluation study for ejection seats was conducted. It provides comparison between a variety of operational and prototype cushions (baseline cushion, honeycomb and air-cushion) and three different installation rail angles (14°, 18°, and 22°). Three operational cockpit environment mockups with adjustable installation rail angle were built. Ten volunteer subjects, six females and four males, ages 19 to 35, participated in the seat comfort evaluation.
1999-10-19
Technical Paper
1999-01-5618
Feng Jiang
This paper examines the capability of the Reynolds-averaged thin-layer Navier-Stokes codes to simulate the results from a two-dimensional aileron effectiveness test. This unique test was carried out in the IAR high Reynolds number wind tunnel and addressed the effects of Reynolds number, Mach number and angle-of-attack on aileron effectiveness. The test results showed a highly nonlinear variation of lift for downward trailing edge deflections. It provides a valuable database for using CFD to determine the adequacy of the corrections applied to the experimental data due to the presence of the wind tunnel walls, and for assessing the current CFD capability to model the flowfield with separation. CFD predictions are obtained by using CFL3D with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and TLNS2D with the modified Johnson-King turbulence model.
2011-06-13
Technical Paper
2011-38-0015
Robert Narducci, Tonja Reinert
The desire to operate rotorcraft in icing conditions has renewed the interest in developing high-fidelity analysis methods to predict ice accumulation and the ensuing rotor performance degradation. A subset of providing solutions for rotorcraft icing problems is predicting two-dimensional ice accumulation on rotor airfoils. While much has been done to predict ice for fixed-wing airfoil sections, the rotorcraft problem has two additional challenges: first, rotor airfoils tend to experience flows in higher Mach number regimes, often creating glaze ice which is harder to predict; second, rotor airfoils oscillate in pitch to produce balance across the rotor disk. A methodology and validation test cases are presented to solve the rotor airfoil problem as an important step to solving the larger rotorcraft icing problem. The process couples Navier-Stokes CFD analysis with the ice accretion analysis code, LEWICE3D.
2007-09-17
Technical Paper
2007-01-3921
Ying Teng
The robust stability of an active flexible wing section with leading- and trailing-edge control surfaces is further investigated via the μ-method. Motivated by a more detailed servo control dynamics, the two controllers K1 and K2, which command the deflections of the trailing-edge flap and the leading-edge flap respectively, are modeled as two second-order shock absorbers in this study. The nominal and robust stability margins, modal properties, critical flutter airspeeds and frequencies are computed to predict the flutter of a nonlinear aeroelastic system and to investigate the aeroservoelastic stability in the μ-framework. The simulation results are compared with the previous study of which the controllers were modeled as the simplified (first-order) shock absorbers. The improved sensitivity to detect the control-structure coupling is observed by applying the second-order shock absorbers in the ASE model.
2009-11-10
Technical Paper
2009-01-3183
Stephen A. Ridlon
Managing the security of the infrastructure and applications for any aviation IT system necessitates some sort of control mechanism(s) for defining how the various components and processes of the system work. This is true for both the network components, applications within the infrastructure, and the various security infrastructure components such as access control mechanisms, intrusion detection systems, etc. The need for a comprehensive, defense in depth, solution to security can only be met if there is an association between the controls regulating the various security components, so that there is a consistent approach to regulating and controlling security. To meet this need we propose a unifying Global Policy Framework concept, that includes a Policy Workbench for developing and administrating the policies associated with security components and the security infrastructure.
2009-07-12
Technical Paper
2009-01-2416
Dwight E. Link, David E. Williams
The International Space Station (ISS) program is nearing an assembly complete configuration with the addition of the final resource node module in early 2010. The Node 3 module will provide critical functionality in support of permanent long duration crews aboard ISS. The new module will permanently house the regenerative Environment Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and will also provide important habitability functions such as waste management and exercise facilities. The ISS program has selected the Port side of the Node 1 “Unity” module as the permanent location for Node 3 which will necessitate architecture changes to provide the required interfaces. The USOS ECLSS fluid and ventilation systems, Internal Thermal Control Systems, and Avionics Systems require significant modifications in order to support Node 3 interfaces at the Node 1 Port location since it was not initially designed for that configuration.
2005-07-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2801
Ching-fen Tsai, Henry Castro, Steve Iwohara, Takeshi Kamiya, Sadamu Ito, Terumasa Kohama, Ryoichi Kanazawa
The Centrifuge Accommodation Module (CAM) is designed to be one of the modules of the International Space Station (ISS) for performing on-orbit science experiments over an extended period of time. The common cabin air assembly (CCAA) is utilized as the hardware for air temperature and humidity control (THC) for the CAM module cabin. The CCAA unit contains a variable speed fan, heat exchanger, temperature control valve, water separator, temperature sensor, and electrical interface box. A temperature and humidity simulation model was developed to perform the THC analysis for the CCAA unit inside the CAM. This model applies both fixed control volume and a quasi-steady-state approach for computing critical information for evaluating/assessing CCAA system performance and capabilities.
2005-07-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2794
Chang H. Son, Evgueni M. Smirnov, Nikolay G. Ivanov, Denis S. Telnov
This study covers CFD simulation of the air ventilation within the Assembly Complete stage of ISS on-orbit configuration of twelve modules. An assessment of ISS cabin aisle way airflow characteristics was performed on the basis of the integrated model computations. Both the quantitative evaluation of velocity distribution and qualitative analysis of three-dimensional airflow are presented.
2006-07-17
Technical Paper
2006-01-2058
Richard Reysa, Steve Van Keuren, Cindy Philistine, Dwight “Chip” Link
Currently the International Space Station (ISS) has limited Regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) capability. This capability only consists of condensate water recovery that is resident in the Russian Segment (RS). The ISS program planned to have the United States (U.S.) Regenerative ECLSS located in the Node 3 element, however recently the program directed earlier implementation of the U.S. Regenerative ECLSS into the U.S. laboratory element. This configuration change is in the process of being implemented to allow for earlier integration of the three racks containing urine processing, water processing, and oxygen generation regenerative functions into the U.S. Laboratory. The Regenerative ECLSS functions were originally planned for operation aboard ISS after the launch and attachment of the Node 3 element in early 2010.
2006-07-17
Technical Paper
2006-01-2050
Brian Dunaway
Since flight requirements often necessitate last-minute re-analysis, it became crucial to develop flexible and comprehensive transport phenomena analysis software that would quickly ensure all vehicle and payload requirements would be satisfied. The software would replace various mainframe-based software, such as the Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (TRASYS) and the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA). The software would need to have the flexibility to employ models that could be developed and modified as vehicle systems change. By use of event files which contain simple, intuitive commands, the characteristics of individual missions could be built as inputs to the model. By moving the Environmental Control & Life Support (ECLS) system model to the PC environment, each analyst would have execution, storage, and processing management control. And of course, software portability would be greatly increased.
2006-07-17
Technical Paper
2006-01-2091
Daniel J. Leonard, Richard G. Ehmer
The Nitrogen System aboard the International Space Station (Station) continues to maintain Station total pressure and support several ongoing scientific and medical tasks. This paper addresses elevated leakage in the Nitrogen System, behavior during events such as nitrogen usage in other parts of the Station, and describes behavioral changes of the nitrogen Regulator/Relief Valve (regulator) since the activation of the Nitrogen System in 2001.
2006-07-17
Technical Paper
2006-01-2092
George Steiner, Souzan Maleki Thoresen, Richard Reysa, John Granahan
This paper summarizes the first 5 plus years of on-orbit operation for the Major Constituent Analyzer (MCA). The MCA is an essential part of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS). The MCA is a mass spectrometer instrument in the US Destiny Laboratory Module of the International Space Station. The MCA provides critical monitoring of six major atmospheric constituents (nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water vapor (H2O)) sampled continuously and automatically in all United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) modules via the Sample Distribution System (SDS). Sample lines have been routed throughout the U.S. modules with valves to facilitate software-automated sequential sampling of the atmosphere in the various modules.
2007-07-09
Technical Paper
2007-01-3116
M. Y. Kim, A. L. Ponomarev, H. Nounu, H. Hussein, F. A. Cucinotta, William Atwell
Protecting astronauts from space radiation exposure is an important challenge for mission design and operations for future exploration-class and long-duration missions. Crew members are exposed to sporadic solar particle events (SPEs) as well as to the continuous galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). If sufficient protection is not provided the radiation risk to crew members from SPEs could be significant. To improve exposure risk estimates and radiation protection from SPEs, detailed evaluations of radiation shielding properties are required. A model using a modern CAD tool ProE™, which is the leading engineering design platform at NASA, has been developed for this purpose. For the calculation of radiation exposure at a specific site, the cosine distribution was implemented to replicate the omnidirectional characteristic of the 4π particle flux on a surface.
2007-07-09
Technical Paper
2007-01-3071
Steven F. Balistreri, Chang H. Son, Edward H. Turner
Currently scheduled to be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009, Crew Quarters (CQs) will be installed in the Node 2 Module. The CQs provide crewmembers with private space, a place to sleep, and minimal storage. Analysis is to be performed to determine if the United States Operational Segment (USOS) Node 2 can maintain temperature between 47°C and 62°C (65°F and 80°F) [units are CCGS with U.S unit in parenthesis] within the CQ. The analysis will concentrate on the nominal hot environmental case. Environmental heat is due to solar heating of the external shell of the ISS. Configurations including both three and four CQs are examined, as well as multiple configurations of the Low Temperature Loop (LTL) that flows through the Node 2 Common Cabin Air Assembly (CCAA). This paper describes the analysis performed to determine if Node 2 will be able to maintain cabin temperature between 47°C and 62°C (65°F and 85°F).
2005-07-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-3119
Savino De Palo, Bruce D. Wright, Robert W. Clark, Brian G. Rhone, Zoltan Szigetvari, Stephan Hinderer, Jan Persson
ESA and NASA agencies agreed to run an interface compatibility test at the EADS facility between the Columbus flight module and a duplicate ground unit of a currently on-orbit US International Standard Payload Rack, the Human Research Facility (HRF) Flight Prototype Rack (FPR). The purpose of the test was to demonstrate the capability to run US payloads inside the European ISS module Columbus. One of the critical aspects to be verified to ensure suitable operations of the two systems was the combined performance of the hydraulic controls resident in the HRF and Columbus coolant loops. A hydraulic model of the HRF FPR was developed and combined with the Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) model. Several coupled thermal-hydraulic test cases were then performed, preceded by mathematical analysis, required to predict safe test conditions and to optimize the Columbus valve configurations.
1999-04-13
Technical Paper
1999-01-1436
James M. Urnes
In situations of unanticipated maneuvers of an aircraft, information must be immediately received by the aircrew for correcting the aircraft flight path to a safe trajectory for continued flight and landing. These maneuvers may be due to failures in the control system, wind gust upsets, or other off-nominal conditions. Also critical are situations of control maneuvers that exceed the normal flight envelope of the aircraft, and providing information to the pilot and control system that will result in safe return to controllable flight. The Intelligent Damage Adaptive Control System (IDACS) operates during flight to detect dangerous conditions of the aircraft and to provide the crew with assistance to restore and to maintain safe control. This system is being developed by Boeing for NASA.
1999-04-13
Technical Paper
1999-01-1437
Michael G. Clemmons
This paper is an explanation of some of the Flight Test Safety (FTS) methods used to reduce the risk associated with military rotorcraft development. Two flight test programs are addressed, the V-22 Osprey tiltrotor and the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter. A short history of the development of each program is provided as background information. Some of the challenges and strengths of joint ventures are also identified and discussed. Four critical elements of an FTS program are identified: 1) Organizational Risk Management (ORM), 2) issue/anomaly resolution, 3) incident recording and corrective action documentation and 4) interface between FTS and other organizations. Methods used in the two programs to address these elements are reviewed and can be applied to other flight test programs.
2000-07-10
Technical Paper
2000-01-2250
Brian Dunaway, Marybeth Edeen, Ching-Fen Tsai, Edward Turner
Crewmember ingress of the International Space Station (ISS) before that time accorded by the original ISS assembly sequence, and thus before the ISS capability to adequately control the levels of temperature, humidity, and carbon dioxide, poses significant impacts to ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS). Among the most significant considerations necessitated by early ingress are those associated with the capability of the Shuttle Transportation System (STS) Orbiter to control the aforementioned levels, the capability of the ISS to deliver the conditioned air among the ISS elements, and the definition and distribution of crewmember metabolic heat, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. Even under the assumption that all Orbiter and ISS elements would be operating as designed, condensation control and crewmember comfort were paramount issues preceding each of the ISS Missions 2A and 2A.1.
2000-07-10
Technical Paper
2000-01-2441
Amy E. Heartsill, Robert K. Levy, Ryne D. Baker
The design challenges presented by the late evolving International Space Station (ISS) Launch to Activation (LTA) thermal concerns required concerted effort and tradeoffs to be made between affected subsystems. The resulting design and mission planning modifications were made with consideration of thermal, electrical power system and extravehicular activity impacts in mind. It was an excellent exercise in cooperative problem solving that allowed each subsystem visibility into potential impacts of their efforts on other related systems and therefore work towards balanced solutions. It was also an excellent exercise in preparing these subsystems for future quick response cooperative problem solving that will be required to support ISS during its lifetime.
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2490
J. L. Perry, R. G. von Jouanne, E. H. Turner
The International Space Station (ISS) uses high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to remove particulate matter from the cabin atmosphere. Known as Bacteria Filter Elements (BFEs), there are 13 elements deployed on board the ISS's U.S. Segment. The pre-flight service life prediction of 1 year for the BFEs is based upon performance engineering analysis of data collected during developmental testing that used a synthetic dust challenge. While this challenge is considered reasonable and conservative from a design perspective, an understanding of the actual filter loading is required to best manage the critical ISS Program resources. Thus testing was conducted on BFEs returned from the ISS to refine the service life prediction. Results from this testing and implications to ISS resource management are discussed. Recommendations for realizing significant savings to the ISS Program are presented.
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2365
Jean B. Hunter, Jon Emanuel, Alan E. Drysdale
Three distinct food system paradigms have been envisioned for long-term space missions. The Skylab, Mir and ISS food systems were based on single-serving prepackaged foods, ready to rehydrate and heat. Bioregenerative food systems, derived from crops grown and processed at the planetary station, have been studied at JSC and KSC. The US Antarctic Program’s Amundsen-Scott South Pole Base uses the third paradigm: bulk packaged food ingredients delivered once a year and used to prepare meals on the station. The packaged food ingredients are supplemented with limited amounts of fresh foods received occasionally during the Antarctic summer, trace amounts of herb and salad crops from the hydroponic garden, and some prepackaged ready to eat foods, so the Pole system is actually a hybrid system; however, it is worth studying as a bulk packaged food system because of the preponderance of bulk packaged food ingredients used.
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2413
Edward Hodgson, Ronald Sidgreaves, Stephen Braham, Jeffrey Hoffman, Christopher Carr, Pascal Lee, Jose Marmolejo, Jonathan Miller, Ilia Rosenberg, Steven Schwartz
NASA has long recognized the advantages of providing improved information interfaces to EVA astronauts and has pursued this goal through a number of development programs over the past decade. None of these activities or parallel efforts in industry and academia has so far resulted in the development of an operational system to replace or augment the current extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) Display and Controls Module (DCM) display and cuff checklist. Recent advances in display, communications, and information processing technologies offer exciting new opportunities for EVA information interfaces that can better serve the needs of a variety of NASA missions. Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International (HSSSI) has been collaborating with Simon Fraser University and others on the NASA Haughton Mars Project and with researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Boeing, and Symbol Technologies in investigating these possibilities.
2003-07-07
Technical Paper
2003-01-2438
Ching-Fen Tsai, Hong-Zong Lin
An air quality simulation and assessment (AQSA) model was developed to simulate/evaluate the integrated system performance and obtain air quality characteristics and air contaminants inside the habitable compartments. This model applies both fixed control volume and quasi-steady-state approach for a multi-volume system to assess system performance, operating constraints, and capabilities. The model also integrates a state-of-the-art probabilistic analysis tool, UNIPASS, to compute failure probability due to the uncertainties of variables. In addition, this integrated model also predicts the most likely outcomes for analyzing risks and uncertainties as well as for quantitative toxicological evaluation. This model has been successfully and independently corrected/verified by NASA/JSC to be a very effective, reliable, and accurate tool, while providing savings in both the cost and time of the analysis.
2001-07-09
Technical Paper
2001-01-2256
Chang H. Son, Chao-Hsin Lin
The effects of testing cabin ventilation in gravity to meet a requirement for ventilation on orbit were analyzed. Buoyancy is due to the combined presence of a density gradient within the fluid and a body force that is proportional to the fluid density. Since gravity cannot be removed, the test must be conducted with air at as near to constant density as practical in order to remove buoyancy effects. The effects of gravity induced buoyancy force on the velocity field was analyzed by the Richardson number. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to verify the theoretical methods. The velocity data for a 1-g and a no gravity case were compared. The ratio between local velocity and free stream velocity, u/U∞ were analyzed for the dimensionless parameter, η (= y ✓ U∞/νx). There is a relatively sharp rise in the profile near the wall and an overshoot of the velocity beyond its free stream value.
2002-04-16
Technical Paper
2002-01-1540
Ray Baron
Schedule/Cost Risk, politics, competition for capital dollars are all factors affecting our project decisions and choices. Not understanding the key elements of a project that will contribute to schedule and cost risk will invariably result in overruns that can quickly absorb the returns expected from the investment. This paper attempts to provide the project team with a model that considers some risk factor elements to assist with the selection of project alternatives and more intelligent schedule/cost estimating.
2002-07-15
Technical Paper
2002-01-2518
Sabrina Maxwell, Alan E. Drysdale
Clothing supply has been examined for historical, current, and planned missions. For STS, crew clothing is stowed on the orbiter and returned to JSC for refurbishment. On Mir, clothing was supplied and then disposed of on Progress for incineration on re-entry. For ISS, the Russian laundry and 75% of the US laundry is placed on Progress for destructive re-entry. The rest of the US laundry is stowed in mesh bags and returned to earth in the Multi Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) or in the STS middeck. For previous missions, clothing was supplied and thrown away. Supplying clothing without washing dirty clothing will be costly for long-duration missions. An on-board laundry system may reduce overall mission costs, as shown in previous, less accurate, metric studies. Some design and development of flight hardware laundry systems has been completed, such as the SBIR Phase I and Phase II study performed by UMPQUA Research Company for JSC in 1993.
2002-07-15
Technical Paper
2002-01-2478
Michael P. Alazraki, John Hogan, Julie Levri, John Fisher, Alan Drysdale
Solid Waste Management (SWM) requirements need to be defined prior to determining what technologies should be developed by the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Project. Since future waste streams will be highly mission-dependent, missions need to be defined prior to developing SWM requirements. The SWM Working Group has used the mission architectures outlined in the System Integration, Modeling and Analysis (SIMA) Element Reference Missions Document (RMD) as a starting point in the requirement development process. The missions examined include the International Space Station (ISS), a Mars Dual Lander mission, and a Mars Base. The SWM Element has also identified common SWM functionalities needed for future missions. These functionalities include: acceptance, transport, processing, storage, monitoring and control, and disposal. Requirements in each of these six areas are currently being developed for the selected missions.
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