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Viewing 1 to 30 of 137
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1355
Mong-Tung Lin, Volker Sick
Quantitative LIF measurements of liquid fuel films on the piston of direct-injected gasoline engines are difficult to achieve because generally these films are thin and the signal strength is low. Additionally, interference from scattered laser light or background signal can be substantial. The selection of a suitable fluorescence tracer and excitation wavelength plays an important role in the success of such measurements. We have investigated the possibility of using toluene as a tracer for fuel film measurements and compare it to the use of 3-pentanone. The fuel film dynamics in a motored engine at different engine speeds, temperatures and in-cylinder swirl levels is characterized and discussed.
2004-06-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1923
José Rico, Volker Sick
The transient cone angle of a pressure swirl spray from an injector for gasoline direct injection engines was measured from 2D Mie scattering images. Iso-octane was used as the fluid that was delivered at room temperature for two different static pressures, 5MPa and 8.5MPa. The iso-octane was injected into a chamber at room temperature and ambient pressure. After a rapid initial increase, the cone angle oscillates before stabilizing to a steady-state value very close to the nominal cone angle. The period of the oscillation was found to correlate well with oscillations measured in the fuel line pressure.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1660
Hidekazu Nishigaki, Noboru Kikuchi
We have proposed First Order Analysis (FOA) as a method, which the engineering designers themselves can use easily in an initial design stage. In this paper, we focus on the crashworthiness, and present the method to predict the collapse behavior of the frame member. This method is divided into two parts. Those are (1) collapse analysis under loading conditions of combined axial force and bending moment to the cantilever, and (2) collapse analysis of structural member considering the previously obtained moment - rotation angle relationship using the beam element. In comparison with the results according to the detailed Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model, effectiveness and validity of this method are presented.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1758
Michael J. Flannagan, Michael Sivak
Advances in electronic countermeasures for lane-change crashes, including both camera-based rear vision systems and object-detection systems, have provided more options for meeting driver needs than were previously available with rearview mirrors. To some extent, human factors principles can be used to determine what countermeasures would best meet driver needs. However, it is also important to examine sets of crash data as closely as possible for the information they may provide. We review previous analyses of crash data and attempt to reconcile the implications of these analyses with each other as well as with general human factors principles. We argue that the data seem to indicate that the contribution of blind zones to lane-change crashes is substantial.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1538
Gi-Woo Kim, Joseph Kucharski, Gregory Pietron, Diana Yanakiev, Yuji Fujii, Kon-Well Wang
This paper presents the characterization of the random noise in driveline output shaft torque measurements that is commonly induced by road disturbances. To investigate the interaction between the shaft torque and road side excitation, torque signals are measured using a magnetoelastic torque sensor, as well as a conventional strain gauge sensor, under various types of road surfaces and conditions such as unevenness. A generalized de-trending method for producing a stationary random signal is first conducted. Statistical methods, in particular the probability density function and transform technique, are utilized to provide an evident signature for identifying the road excitation effect on the vehicle output shaft torque. Analysis results show how the road surface can act as a disturbance input to the vehicle shaft torque.
1999-10-25
Technical Paper
1999-01-3473
Huixian Shen, Tariq Shamim, Subrata Sengupta
Automotive exhaust emission regulations are becoming progressively stricter due to increasing awareness of the hazardous effects of exhaust emissions. The main challenge to meet the regulations is to reduce the emissions during cold starts, because catalytic converters are ineffective until they reach a light-off temperature. It has been found that 50% to 80% of the regulated hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions are emitted from the automotive tailpipe during the cold starts. Therefore, understanding the catalytic converter characteristics during the cold starts is important for the improvement of the cold start performances This paper describes a mathematical model that simulates transient performances of catalytic converters. The model considers the effect of heat transfer and catalyst chemical reactions as exhaust gases flow through the catalyst. The heat transfer model includes the heat loss by conduction and convection.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0995
Michael Panagiotidis, George Delagrammatikas, Dennis N. Assanis
A regenerative braking model for a parallel Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) is developed in this work. This model computes the line and pad pressures for the front and rear brakes, the amount of generator use depending on the state of deceleration (i.e. the brake pedal position), and includes a wheel lock-up avoidance algorithm. The regenerative braking model has been developed in the symbolic programming environment of MATLAB/SIMULINK/STATEFLOW for downloadability to an actual HEV's control system. The regenerative braking model has been incorporated in NREL's HEV system simulation called ADVISOR. Code modules that have been changed to implement the new regenerative model are described. Resulting outputs are compared to the baseline regenerative braking model in the parent code. The behavior of the HEV system (battery state of charge, overall fuel economy, and emissions characteristics) with the baseline and the proposed regenerative braking strategy are first compared.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0610
Phillip A. Przybylo, Ellen M. Arruda, Clifford C. Chou
Characterization of materials used in the automotive industry is often done via component testing. A strict regimen of tests is conducted on a component to determine material parameters for numerical simulations of more complicated loading conditions. Separation of material constants and geometrically- or experimentallyinduced effects is difficult with this method of characterization. Well-controlled experiments that determine the material response in basic deformations allow material properties to be determined. In this paper low strain rate and high strain rate experimental responses of dummy skin material (i.e. plasticized polyvinyl chloride) are presented. Details of the experimental procedures used to acquire the data are also included. In addition, a rate-dependent constitutive model for the plasticized material is developed, and its simulated results are compared with low strain rate results.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1795
Thomas D. Gillespie
Some of the best teaching methods are laboratory courses in which students experience application of the principles being presented. Preparing young engineering students for a career in the automotive industry challenges us to provide comparable opportunities to explore the dynamic performance of motor vehicles in a controlled environment. Today we are fortunate to have accurate and easy-to-use software programs making it practical for students to simulate the performance of motor vehicles on “virtual” proving grounds. At the University of Michigan the CarSim® vehicle dynamics simulation program has been introduced as such a tool to augment the learning experience. The software is used in the Automotive Engineering course to supplement homework exercises analyzing acceleration, braking, aerodynamics, and cornering performance. This paper provides an overview of the use of simulation in this setting.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3753
James D. Smith, Volker Sick
A combination of imaging techniques for investigations of highly transient processes and cyclic variations in internal combustion engines is presented. The single high-speed camera setup uses a CMOS camera combined with a two-stage image-intensifier and two excimer lasers. Fuel mixing, ignition and combustion were monitored via planar laser induced fluorescence imaging of toluene as a tracer that was added to iso-octane in combination with the simultaneous recording of light emission from the spark plasma and OH* chemiluminescence of the developing flame. Image frame rates of 12 kHz for hundreds of cycles were achieved. Application to misfire events in a spray-guided gasoline direct-injection engine is described to illustrate the merits of the technique.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3757
Bin Wu, Robert G. Prucka, Zoran Filipi, Denise M. Kramer, Gregory L. Ohl
Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) technology provides high potential in achieving high performance, low fuel consumption and pollutant reduction. However, more degrees of freedom impose a big challenge for engine characterization and calibration. In this study, a simulation based approach and optimization framework is proposed to optimize the setpoints of multiple independent control variables. Since solving an optimization problem typically requires hundreds of function evaluations, a direct use of the high-fidelity simulation tool leads to the unbearably long computational time. Hence, the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are trained with high-fidelity simulation results and used as surrogate models, representing engine's response to different control variable combinations with greatly reduced computational time. To demonstrate the proposed methodology, the cam-phasing strategy at Wide Open Throttle (WOT) is optimized for a dual-independent Variable Valve Timing (VVT) engine.
2007-10-29
Technical Paper
2007-01-4034
James D. Smith, Volker Sick
Near-term energy policy for ground transportation is likely to have a strong focus on both gains in efficiency as well as the use of alternate fuels; as both can reduce crude oil dependence and carbon loading on the environment. Stratified-charge spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engines are capable of achieving significant gains in efficiency. In addition, these engines are likely to be run on alternative fuels. Specifically, lower alcohols such as ethanol and iso-butanol, which can be produced from renewable sources. SIDI engines, particularly the spray-guided variant, tend to be very sensitive to mixture preparation since fuel injection and ignition occur within a short time of each other. This close spacing is necessary to form a flammable mixture near the spark plug while maintaining an overall lean state in the combustion chamber. As a result, the physical properties of the fuel have a large effect on this process.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0508
Dong Wook Lee, Zheng-Dong Ma, Noboru Kikuchi
In the I-bumper (inflatable bumper) concept [1], two explosive airbags are released just before the main body-to-body crash in order to absorb the kinetic energy of colliding vehicles. The release also actuates other components in the I-bumper, including a movable bumper and an energy absorption morphing lattice structure. A small explosive charge will be used to deploy the airbag. A conventional airbag model will be used to reduce the crash energy in a controlled manner and reduce the peak impact force. An analytic model of the explosive airbag is developed in this paper for the I-bumper system and for its optimal design, while the complete system design (I-bumper) will be discussed in a separate paper. Analytical formulations for an explosive airbag will be developed and major design variables will be identified. These are used to determine the required amount of explosive and predict airbag behavior, as well to predict their impact on the I-bumper system.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0512
Dong Wook Lee, Zheng-Dong Ma, Noboru Kikuchi
The greatest demand facing the automotive industry has been to provide safer vehicles with high fuel efficiency at minimum cost. Current automotive vehicle structures have one fundamental handicap: a short crumple zone for crash energy absorption. This leaves limited room for further safety improvement, especially for high-speed crashes. Breakthrough technologies are needed. One potential breakthrough is to use active devices instead of conventional passive devices. An innovative inflatable bumper concept [1], called the “I-bumper,” is being developed by the authors for crashworthiness and safety of military and commercial vehicles. The proposed I-bumper has several active structural components, including a morphing mechanism, a movable bumper, two explosive airbags, and a morphing lattice structure with a locking mechanism that provides desired rigidity and energy absorption capability during a vehicular crash.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0231
Alexander Knafl, Manbae Han, Stanislav V. Bohac, Dennis N. Assanis, Patrick G. Szymkowicz
This paper analyzes and compares reactor and engine behavior of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) in the presence of conventional diesel exhaust and low temperature premixed compression ignition (PCI) diesel exhaust. Surrogate exhaust mixtures of n-undecane (C11H24), ethene (C2H4), CO, O2, H2O, NO and N2 are defined for conventional and PCI combustion and used in the gas flow reactor tests. Both engine and reactor tests use a DOC containing platinum, palladium and a hydrocarbon storage component (zeolite). On both the engine and reactor, the composition of PCI exhaust increases light-off temperature relative to conventional combustion. However, while nominal conditions are similar, the catalyst behaves differently on the two experimental setups. The engine DOC shows higher initial apparent HC conversion efficiencies because the engine exhaust contains a higher fraction of trappable (i.e., high boiling point) HC.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0973
S. P. Gladyshev, V. M. Bunov, V. S. Morozova, E. V. Bunova, V. S. Goon
The feature of offered algorithm is that it allows, without record and analysis of the display diagram, to estimate a running cycle of a diesel engine parameters which characterize ecological and economic performances. The mathematical model described in report allows to determine connection of coefficient of filling, pressure and temperature of air boost, factor of excess of air with effectiveness ratio of combustion and contents of soot in exhaust gas and to take into account this connection at a choice initial data for control fuel feed or for elaboration of diesel engine dynamic model. The algorithm incorporated, for example, in the microcontroller of an electronic fuel feed controller allows analyzing the sensors data and theoretically determine of smoke amount in the exhaust gases for chosen cycle of fuel feed. The restriction of smoke is possible by criterion dD/dGT, where D - contents of soot in exhaust gas and GT - fuel cycle submission under the program-adaptive schema.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3376
James D. Smith, Volker Sick
The spark process has previously been shown to heavily influence ignition stability, particularly in direct-injected gasoline engines. Despite this influence, few studies have addressed spark behavior in direct-injected engines. This study examines the role of environmental factors on the behavior of the spark. Through measurement of the spark duration, by way of the ignition current trace, several observations are made on the influence of external factors on the behavior of the spark. Changing the level of nitrogen in the cylinder (to simulate EGR), the level of wetting and velocity imparted by the spray, the ignition dwell time and the orientation of the ground strap, observations are made as to which conditions are likely to produce unfavorable (shorter) spark durations. Through collection of a statistically significant number of sample spark lengths under each condition, histograms have been assembled and compared under each case.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2337
Sang Bum Hong, Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Robert Mantey, David Gorsich
ADRPM (Acoustic Detection Range Prediction Model) is a software program that models the propagation of acoustic energy through the atmosphere and evaluates detectable distance. ADRPM predicts the distance of detection for a noise source based on the acoustic signature of the source. The acoustic signature of a vehicle is computed by combining BEA and EBEA computations with nearfield measurements. The computed signature is utilized as the input to ADRPM. Once the initial detection range is predicted the main contributors to the acoustic detection are identified by ADRPM and their location on the vehicle is modified in order to assess the corresponding effect to the detectable distance of the vehicle.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2373
Jiulong Sun, Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Kevin Hu
Numerical models are used for computing the shock response in many areas of engineering applications. Current analysis methods do not account for uncertainties in the model parameters. In addition, when numerical models are calibrated based on test data neither the uncertainty which is present in the test data nor the uncertainty in the model are taken into account. In this paper an approach for model update under uncertainty and error estimation for shock applications is presented. Fast running models are developed for the model update based on principal component analysis and surrogate models. Once the numerical model has been updated the fast running models are employed for performing probabilistic analyses and estimate the error in the numerical solution. The new developments are applied for computing the shock response of large scale structures, updating the numerical model based on test data, and estimating the error in the predictions.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2421
Sang Bum Hong, Nickolas Vlahopoulos
A hybrid finite element formulation for analyzing flexible plates connected to stiff frame was developed. The excitation was considered to be applied on the stiff members. Conventional FEA models were employed for modeling the behavior of the stiff members in a system. Appropriate damping elements were introduced in the connections between stiff and flexible members in order to capture the presence of the flexible members during the analyses of the stiff ones. Once the vibration of the stiff members and the amount of power dissipated at the damping elements was identified, an EFEA analysis was performed in order to determine the amount of vibrational energy in the flexible members. The hybrid FEA is applied to a Body-In-White (BIW). The results of the hybrid FEA are compared with results from very dense conventional finite element analyses.
2005-05-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2122
David L. Reuss, Volker Sick
A four-valve-pentroof, direct-injection, optical engine fueled with n-heptane has been operated at four different steady-state HCCI operating conditions including 10% and 65% residuals, both at low and high swirl conditions. Both, planar toluene LIF and volume chemiluminescence show large scale inhomogeneity in the ensemble averaged images. The interpretation of the toluene-tracer LIF signals (when premixed with the fresh-air charge) as a marker for reaction homogeneity is discussed. A binarization scheme and a statistical analysis of the LIF images were applied to the per-cycle planar-LIF images revealing inhomogeneities both from cycle-to-cycle and within the regions of individual cycles that track with the average heat release rate. Comparison of these two homogeneity metrics between the four operating conditions reveals weak but discernable differences.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0445
Michael J. Flannagan, Michael Sivak
Advances in camera and display technology have increased interest in using camera-based systems for all rear-vision functions. The flexibility of camera-based systems is unprecedented, and raises the possibility of providing drivers with fields of view that are very different from, and potentially much better than, those of conventional rearview mirrors. Current fields of view are based on a combination of driver needs and the practical constraints of mirror systems. In order to make the best use of the greater flexibility offered by cameras, a reassessment of drivers' needs for rear vision is needed. A full reassessment will require consideration of many factors. This paper offers a preliminary analysis of one of those factors: the visual workload involved in using rear-vision systems with single versus multiple displays.
2005-05-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2090
Nicole Wermuth, Volker Sick
Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of fuel/air mixing in engines are usually based on the use of fluorescence tracers. The strength of the signals often depends on temperature, pressure and mixture composition. This complicates a quantitative analysis. The use of a small-bore optical engine for fundamental studies of absorption and fluorescence properties of fluorescence tracers is described. The temperature, pressure and composition dependence of the spectra of toluene, acetone, 3-pentanone, and biacetyl are examined under motored conditions to extend the experimental data base for the development of comprehensive models that predict the strength of fluorescence signals for a given condition.
2005-05-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2089
Udo Fissenewert, Volker Sick, Helmut Pucher
The spatial and temporal formation of nitric oxide in an optical engine operated with iso-octane fuel under spray-guided direct-injection conditions was studied with a combination of laser-induced fluorescence imaging, UV-chemiluminescence, and cycle resolved NO exhaust gas analysis. NO formation during early and late (homogeneous vs. stratified) injection conditions were compared. Strong spatial preferences and cyclic variations in the NO formation were observed depending on engine operating conditions. While engine-out NO levels are substantially lower for stratified engine operation, cyclic variations of NO formation are substantially higher than for homogeneous, stoichiometric operation.
2004-10-25
Technical Paper
2004-01-2939
Jordan A. Snyder, Ronald O. Grover, Volker Sick, Dennis N. Assanis
The transient cone angle of pressure swirl sprays from injectors intended for use in gasoline direct injection engines was measured from 2D Mie scattering images. A variety of injectors with varying nominal cone angle and flow rate were investigated. The general cone angle behavior was found to correlate well qualitatively with the measured fuel line pressure and was affected by the different injector specifications. Experimentally measured modulations in cone angle and injection pressure were forced on a comprehensive spray simulation to understand the sensitivity of pulsating injector boundary conditions on general spray structure. Ignoring the nozzle fluctuations led to a computed spray shape that inadequately replicated the experimental images; hence, demonstrating the importance of quantifying the injector boundary conditions when characterizing a spray using high-fidelity simulation tools.
2004-10-25
Technical Paper
2004-01-2975
Rui Zhang, Nicole Wermuth, Volker Sick
For applications of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to measure the fuel or equivalence ratio distributions in internal combustion (IC) engines it is typically assumed that the addition of a fluorescence tracer to a base fuel does not alter the combustion performance. We have investigated the impact on combustion performance through the addition of various amounts of 3-pentanone or toluene to iso-octane fuel. Correlations between equivalence ratio for a range of fuel/tracer mixtures and engine parameters, like peak pressure, location of peak pressure, indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP), and peak burn rate are discussed for data obtained in a spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) gasoline engine operated with near homogeneous charge. For typical tracer concentrations the impact on combustion performance is mostly negligible.
2007-05-15
Technical Paper
2007-01-2333
Keychun Park, Matthew P. Castanier
When performing vibration analysis of complex vehicle structures, it is often important to be able to evaluate the effects of design changes in one or more substructures (e.g., for design optimization). It may also be convenient to allow different components to be modeled independently by different groups or organizations. For both cases, it is inevitable that some substructures will have non-matching finite element meshes at the interface where they are physically connected. Thus, a key challenge is to be able to handle the dynamic assembly of components with non-matching meshes and the subsequent global vibration analysis in a systematic and efficient manner. To tackle this problem, the enhancement of component mode synthesis methods for handling finite element models partitioned into non-matching substructures is considered in this paper. Some existing methods are reviewed, and new methods are developed.
2007-05-15
Technical Paper
2007-01-2303
Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Sheng Li, Michel Viktorovitch, Davide Caprioli
The hybrid Finite Element Analysis (hybrid FEA) has been developed for performing structure-borne computations in automotive vehicle structures [1, 2 and 3]. The hybrid FEA method combines conventional FEA with Energy FEA (EFEA). Conventional FEA models are employed for modeling the behavior of the stiff members in a system. Appropriate damping and spring or mass elements are introduced in the connections between stiff and flexible members in order to capture the presence of the flexible members during the analyses of the stiff ones. The component mode synthesis method is combined with analytical solutions for determining the driving point conductance at joints between stiff and flexible members and for defining the properties of the concentrated elements which represent the flexible members when analyzing the stiff components.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0947
Michael J. Flannagan, Michael Sivak
The effects of image size on perceived distance have been of concern for convex rearview mirrors as well as camera-based rear vision systems. We suggest that the importance of image size is limited to cases-such as current rearview mirrors-in which the field of view is small. With larger, richer fields of view it is likely that other distance cues will dominate image size, thereby substantially diminishing the concern that distortions of size will result in distortions of distance perception. We report results from an experiment performed in a driving simulator, with static simulated rearward images, in which subjects were asked to make judgments about the distance to a rearward vehicle. The images showed a field of view substantially wider than provided by any of the individual rearview mirrors in current systems. The field of view was 38 degrees wide and was presented on displays that were either 16.7 or 8.5 degrees wide, thus minifying images by factors of 0.44 or 0.22.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0726
Dohoy Jung, Dennis N. Assanis
Compact heat exchangers have been widely used in various applications in thermal fluid systems including automotive thermal management systems. Radiators for engine cooling systems, evaporators and condensers for HVAC systems, oil coolers, and intercoolers are typical examples of the compact heat exchangers that can be found in ground vehicles. Among the different types of heat exchangers for engine cooling applications, cross flow compact heat exchangers with louvered fins are of special interest because of their higher heat rejection capability with the lower flow resistance. In this study, a predictive numerical model for the cross flow type heat exchanger with louvered fins has been developed based on the thermal resistance concept and the finite difference method in order to provide a design and development tool for the heat exchanger. The model was validated with the experimental data from an engine cooling radiator.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 137

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