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Viewing 1 to 30 of 66
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2337
Sang Bum Hong, Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Robert Mantey, David Gorsich
ADRPM (Acoustic Detection Range Prediction Model) is a software program that models the propagation of acoustic energy through the atmosphere and evaluates detectable distance. ADRPM predicts the distance of detection for a noise source based on the acoustic signature of the source. The acoustic signature of a vehicle is computed by combining BEA and EBEA computations with nearfield measurements. The computed signature is utilized as the input to ADRPM. Once the initial detection range is predicted the main contributors to the acoustic detection are identified by ADRPM and their location on the vehicle is modified in order to assess the corresponding effect to the detectable distance of the vehicle.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2373
Jiulong Sun, Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Kevin Hu
Numerical models are used for computing the shock response in many areas of engineering applications. Current analysis methods do not account for uncertainties in the model parameters. In addition, when numerical models are calibrated based on test data neither the uncertainty which is present in the test data nor the uncertainty in the model are taken into account. In this paper an approach for model update under uncertainty and error estimation for shock applications is presented. Fast running models are developed for the model update based on principal component analysis and surrogate models. Once the numerical model has been updated the fast running models are employed for performing probabilistic analyses and estimate the error in the numerical solution. The new developments are applied for computing the shock response of large scale structures, updating the numerical model based on test data, and estimating the error in the predictions.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2421
Sang Bum Hong, Nickolas Vlahopoulos
A hybrid finite element formulation for analyzing flexible plates connected to stiff frame was developed. The excitation was considered to be applied on the stiff members. Conventional FEA models were employed for modeling the behavior of the stiff members in a system. Appropriate damping elements were introduced in the connections between stiff and flexible members in order to capture the presence of the flexible members during the analyses of the stiff ones. Once the vibration of the stiff members and the amount of power dissipated at the damping elements was identified, an EFEA analysis was performed in order to determine the amount of vibrational energy in the flexible members. The hybrid FEA is applied to a Body-In-White (BIW). The results of the hybrid FEA are compared with results from very dense conventional finite element analyses.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3757
Bin Wu, Robert G. Prucka, Zoran Filipi, Denise M. Kramer, Gregory L. Ohl
Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) technology provides high potential in achieving high performance, low fuel consumption and pollutant reduction. However, more degrees of freedom impose a big challenge for engine characterization and calibration. In this study, a simulation based approach and optimization framework is proposed to optimize the setpoints of multiple independent control variables. Since solving an optimization problem typically requires hundreds of function evaluations, a direct use of the high-fidelity simulation tool leads to the unbearably long computational time. Hence, the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are trained with high-fidelity simulation results and used as surrogate models, representing engine's response to different control variable combinations with greatly reduced computational time. To demonstrate the proposed methodology, the cam-phasing strategy at Wide Open Throttle (WOT) is optimized for a dual-independent Variable Valve Timing (VVT) engine.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1795
Thomas D. Gillespie
Some of the best teaching methods are laboratory courses in which students experience application of the principles being presented. Preparing young engineering students for a career in the automotive industry challenges us to provide comparable opportunities to explore the dynamic performance of motor vehicles in a controlled environment. Today we are fortunate to have accurate and easy-to-use software programs making it practical for students to simulate the performance of motor vehicles on “virtual” proving grounds. At the University of Michigan the CarSim® vehicle dynamics simulation program has been introduced as such a tool to augment the learning experience. The software is used in the Automotive Engineering course to supplement homework exercises analyzing acceleration, braking, aerodynamics, and cornering performance. This paper provides an overview of the use of simulation in this setting.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920404
Michael J. Flannagan, Michael Sivak, Andrew W. Gellatly
In a laboratory study and in a mathematical modeling effort, we evaluated the effects of rearview mirror reflectivity on older and younger subjects' seeing ability under conditions designed to simulate night driving with headlamp glare present in the mirror. Rearview mirror reflectivity was varied while observers were required to detect both rearward stimuli seen through the mirror and forward stimuli seen directly. Lower reflectivity resulted in improved ability to see forward and reduced ability to see to the rear. The reduction in ability to see to the rear was much larger than the improvement in forward seeing. The results of the modeling and the laboratory study were in broad agreement, although there were some significant discrepancies. Although the present results cannot be used to make specific recommendations for rearview mirror reflectivity, they suggest that the reduction in rearward vision as reflectivity is lowered should be considered carefully.
1993-03-01
Technical Paper
930816
Alejandro F. Graf, Norbert Izworski
Abstract The LDH (Limiting Dome Height Test) is widely used at Ford Motor Co. stamping plants laboratories to monitor the formability of incoming sheet materials. Although the LDH test is very easy to implement and interpret, variability of the results and poor reproducibility between laboratories limit its acceptance. In this investigation, some of the causes of variability and differences between plant laboratories are discussed. Much of the experimental work was done at plant laboratories and the results are directly applicable to quality control (QC) machines. It was found that the binder force and the binder shape have a big influence on the results, and they should be carefully controlled. The binder cleaning procedure is also relevant to the test variability. Punch temperature has a much greater influence on QC machines than on research machines and a method for controlling the punch temperature in QC machines is presented.
1993-03-01
Technical Paper
930812
Alejandro F. Graf, William F. Hosford
Abstract Rectangular aluminum sheets were stretched under in-plane plane-strain tension using a simple experimental setup. The samples can be stretched under these conditions until localized necking occurs at the centerline. The strain distributions and the loads were recorded at different strain levels. Good agreement was found between actual loads and those calculated from strain measurements assuming isotropic hardening with a high exponent yield criterion.
1993-03-01
Technical Paper
930794
Shyh-Shyan Lin, Donald J. Patterson
A semi-empirical engine piston/ring assembly friction model based on the concept of the Stribeck diagram and similarity analysis is described. The model was constructed by forming non-dimensional parameters based on design and operating conditions. Friction data collected by the Fixed-Sleeve method described in [1]* at one condition, were used to correlate the coefficient of friction of the assembly and the other non-dimensional parameters. Then, using the instantaneous cylinder pressure as input together with measured and calculated design and operating parameters, reasonable assembly friction and fmep predictions were obtained for a variety of additional conditions, some of which could be compared with experimental values. Model inputs are component dimensions, ring tensions, piston skirt spring constant, piston skirt thermal expansion, engine temperatures, speed, load and oil viscosity.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980135
George Papageorgakis, Dennis N. Assanis
Direct injection of natural gas under high pressure conditions has emerged as a promising option for improving engine fuel economy and emissions. However, since the gaseous injection technology is new, limited experience exists as to the optimum configuration of the injection system and associated combustion chamber design. The present study uses KIVA-3 based, multidimensional modeling to improve the understanding and assist the optimization of the gaseous injection process. Compared to standard k-ε models, a Renormalization Group Theory (RNG) based k-ε model [1] has been found to be in better agreement with experiments in predicting gaseous penetration histories for both free and confined jet configurations. Hence, this validated RNG model is adopted here to perform computations in realistic engine geometries.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950955
Zhejun Fan, Yoram Koren, David Wehe
This paper presents a general control module to control the speed of an electric vehicle (EV). This module consists of a microprocessor and several C-programmable micro-controllers. It uses an identification algorithm to estimate the system parameters on-line. With the estimated parameters, control gains are calculated via pole-placement. In order to compensate for the internal errors, a cross-coupling control algorithm is included. To estimate the true velocity and acceleration from measurements, a discrete-time Kalman filter was utilized. The experimental results validate the general control module for EVs.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950544
A. Selamet, P. M. Radavich
Expansion chambers are widely used in the breathing systems of engines due to their desirable broadband noise attenuation characteristics. Following an earlier analytical and computational work of Sahasrabudhe et al. (1992), the present study investigates the effect of the length on the acoustic attenuation performance of concentric expansion chambers. Three approaches are employed to determine the transmission loss: (1) a two-dimensional, axisymmetric analytical solution; (2) a three-dimensional computational solution based on the boundary element method; and (3) experiments on an extended impedance tube setup with nine expansion chambers fabricated with fixed inlet and outlet ducts, fixed chamber diameters, and varying chamber length to diameter ratios from to 3.53. The results from all three approaches are shown to agree well. The effect of multi-dimensional propagation is discussed in comparison with the classical treatment for the breakdown of planar waves.
1994-03-01
Technical Paper
940305
Tachih Chou, Donald J. Patterson
The distribution of fuel-air mixtures in many L-head engines is not homogeneous. If local mixture is too rich or lean, incomplete combustion occurs. This can play a major role in unburned hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions. Fuel-air mixture distribution depends on in-cylinder swirl and turbulence and is directly related to intake manifold configuration, fuel delivery system design and combustion chamber shape. Understanding the spatial mixture distribution may help improve the design of these aforementioned components. Consequently, a more complete combustion process may result, and emissions reduced. A method that measures the emission of CH and C2 radicals via the use of an optical fiber bundle was used in this research to map the mixture uniformity in the combustion chamber. The intensity ratio (IC2/ICH) was correlated to the fuel-air equivalence ratio. The mixture distribution measured was then correlated with the hydrocarbon emission sequence.
1995-05-01
Technical Paper
951263
A. Selamet, P. M. Radavich
Helmholtz resonators are widely used for noise reduction in vehicle induction and exhaust systems. This study investigates the effect of specific cavity dimensions of these resonators theoretically, computationaly, and experimentally. An analytical model is developed for circular concentric resonators to account for the multidimensional wave propagation in both the neck and the cavity. Driving this model with an oscillating piston isolates the interface between the neck and the resonator volume, thereby allowing, at this location, for an accurate evaluation of the empirical end correction, which is often used with the classical lumped approach in an attempt to incorporate the effect of multidimensional behavior at the transitions. The analytical method developed in the study is then compared with a similar one-dimensional analytical model that also allows for wave propagation in the neck and cavity.
1998-09-29
Technical Paper
982273
Dariusz Ceglarek, Emilio Brahmst
Coordinate measurement gages dominate in the area of dimensional control and variation reduction of automotive body assembly processes. However, coordinate measurement gages do not have the capability to track certain measured features. This incapability introduces inherent measurement error created by part (feature) mislocation in constrained non-measured directions. This inherent measurement error weakens the methods used for process control and variation reduction. In this paper, a principle of measurement uncertainty is developed in order to estimate the measurement error caused by this deficiency. The developed principle describes measurement error, which is independent of any other error related to the mechanical or optical coordinate measurement machines (CMMs, OCMMs). Additionally, an error map determined by the measurement uncertainty principle is created for error compensation.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980919
Carol A. C. Flannagan, Michael J. Flannagan
Five different nonplanar mirrors were evaluated as driver-side rearview mirrors in a field test using Ford employees. Two were spherical convex (differing in radius of curvature), and three were aspheric (differing primarily in the proportion of their surfaces over which radius of curvature was variable). Each participant drove for four weeks with one of the nonplanar mirrors. At three times during the test the participants filled out questionnaires concerning their experience with the mirrors. Driver preferences for the experimental mirrors increased moderately between surveys at one week and at four weeks. At four weeks, all five nonplanar mirrors were preferred to the standard flat mirror by at least a small amount. For each of the five mirror designs there was a large range of opinion. Most notably, a small number of people strongly disliked the aspheric design that involved the largest variable-radius area.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1224
Sang Bum Hong, Nickolas Vlahopoulos
A new development in the area of the hybrid Finite Element Analysis (hybrid FEA) is presented. The hybrid FEA method combines the conventional FEA method with energy FEA (EFEA) for analysis of systems that contain both flexible and stiff members, and is suitable for mid-frequency computations. A formulation for analyzing flexible plates spot-welded to stiff beams when the excitation is applied on the stiff members is developed. Conventional FEA models are employed for modeling the behavior of the stiff members in a system. Appropriate damping elements are introduced in the connections between stiff and flexible members in order to capture the presence of the flexible members during the analyses of the stiff ones.
2006-07-04
Technical Paper
2006-01-2330
K. Han Kim, Bernard J. Martin, R. Brent Gillespie
The relationship between motion and posture was investigated from the kinematics of unconstrained head movements. Head movements for visual gazing exhibited an initial component whose amplitude does not exceed 20.3° for target eccentricity up to 120°. This component was truncated by subsequent corrective movements whose occurrence generally increases with target eccentricity, although with a large variability (R2 ≤ 0.46). The head is finally stabilized at 72% of target eccentricity (R2 ≥ 0.92). These results indicate that the final head posture can be achieved through a number of loosely-programmed kinematic variations. Based on these results, unconstrained head movements were simulated, within the context of application to posture prediction for estimation of the visual field.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1498
K. S. Choi, J. Pan, S. Ho
In this paper, the fatigue failure of the primary roller used in a crankshaft fillet rolling process is investigated by a failure analysis and a two-dimensional finite element analysis. The fillet rolling process is first discussed to introduce the important parameters that influence the fatigue life of the primary roller. The cross sections of failed primary rollers are then examined by an optical microscope and a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to understand the microscopic characteristics of the fatigue failure process. A two-dimensional plane strain finite element analysis is employed to qualitatively investigate the influences of the contact geometry on the contact pressure distribution and the Mises stress distribution near the contact area. Fatigue parameters of the primary rollers are then estimated based on the Findley fatigue theory.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1501
V. Yu, W. Y. Chien, K. S. Choi, J. Pan, D. Close
Resonant frequencies of a resonant bending system with notched crankshaft sections are obtained experimentally and numerically in order to investigate the effect of notch depth on the drop of the resonant frequency of the system. Notches with the depths ranging from 1 to 5 mm, machined by an EDM (Electrical-Discharging Machining) system, were introduced in crankshaft sections at the fillet between the main crank pin and crank cheek. The resonant frequencies of the resonant bending system with the crankshaft sections with various notch depths were first obtained from the experiments. Three-dimensional finite element models of the resonant bending system with the crankshafts sections with various notch depths are then generated. The resonant frequencies based on the finite element computations are in good agreement with those based on the experimental results.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1561
Zhijun Li, Panayotis Georgiopoulos, Panos Y. Papalambros, Zoran Filipi, Guangquan Wu, Xiaodong Yang
The link between manufacturing process and product performance is studied in order to construct analytical, quantifiable criteria for the introduction of new engine technologies and processes. Cost associated with a new process must be balanced against increases in engine performance and thus demand for the particular vehicle. In this work, the effect of the Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM) technique on surface roughness is characterized through measurements of specimens, and a predictive engine simulation is used to quantify performance gains due to the new surface finish. Subsequently, economic cost-benefit analysis is used to evaluate manufacturing decisions based on their impact on firm's profitability. A demonstration study examines the use of AFM for finishing the inner surfaces of intake manifolds for two engines, one installed in a compact car and the other in an SUV.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1660
Hidekazu Nishigaki, Noboru Kikuchi
We have proposed First Order Analysis (FOA) as a method, which the engineering designers themselves can use easily in an initial design stage. In this paper, we focus on the crashworthiness, and present the method to predict the collapse behavior of the frame member. This method is divided into two parts. Those are (1) collapse analysis under loading conditions of combined axial force and bending moment to the cantilever, and (2) collapse analysis of structural member considering the previously obtained moment - rotation angle relationship using the beam element. In comparison with the results according to the detailed Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model, effectiveness and validity of this method are presented.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0066
Bin Wu, Zoran Filipi, Denise M. Kramer, Gregory L. Ohl, Michael J. Prucka, Eugenio DiValetin
An accurate air flow rate model is critical for high-quality air-fuel ratio control in Spark-Ignition engines using a Three-Way-Catalyst. Emerging Variable Valve Timing technology complicates cylinder air charge estimation by increasing the number of independent variables. In our previous study (SAE 2004-01-3054), an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been used successfully to represent the air flow rate as a function of four independent variables: intake camshaft position, exhaust camshaft position, engine speed and intake manifold pressure. However, in more general terms the air flow rate also depends on ambient temperature and pressure, the latter being largely a function of altitude. With arbitrary cam phasing combinations, the ambient pressure effects in particular can be very complex. In this study, we propose using a separate neural network to compensate the effects of altitude on the air flow rate.
2003-06-17
Technical Paper
2003-01-2227
Woojin Park, Don B. Chaffin, Kevin Rider, Bernard J. Martin
Simulation of human motions in virtual environments is an essential component of human CAD (Computer-aided Design) systems. In our earlier SAE papers, we introduced a novel motion simulation approach termed Memory-based Motion Simulation (MBMS). MBMS utilizes existing motion databases and predicts novel motions by modifying existing ‘root’ motions through the use of the motion modification algorithm. MBMS overcomes some limitations of existing motion simulation models, as 1) it simulates different types of motions on a single, unified framework, 2) it simulates motions based on alternative movement techniques, and 3) like real humans, it can learn new movement skills continually over time. The current study evaluates the prediction accuracy of MBMS to prove its utility as a predictive tool for computer-aided ergonomics. A total of 627 whole-body one-handed load transfer motions predicted by the algorithm are compared with actual human motions obtained in a motion capture experiment.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0107
Sangjin Hong, Dennis N. Assanis, Margaret S. Wooldridge, Hong G. Im, Eric Kurtz, Heinz Pitsch
This paper reports the development of a model of diesel combustion and NO emissions, based on a modified eddy dissipation concept (EDC), and its implementation into the KIVA-3V multidimensional simulation. The EDC model allows for more realistic representation of the thin sub-grid scale reaction zone as well as the small-scale molecular mixing processes. Realistic chemical kinetic mechanisms for n-heptane combustion and NOx formation processes are fully incorporated. A model based on the normalized fuel mass fraction is implemented to transition between ignition and combustion. The modeling approach has been validated by comparison with experimental data for a range of operating conditions. Predicted cylinder pressure and heat release rates agree well with measurements. The predictions for NO concentration show a consistent trend with experiments. Overall, the results demonstrate the improved capability of the model for predictions of the combustion process.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-1139
Van-Xuan Tran, Jwo Pan, Tsung-Yu Pan
Fatigue behaviors of aluminum 5754-O spot friction welds made by a concave tool in lap-shear specimens are investigated based on experimental observations and a fatigue life estimation model. Optical micrographs of the welds before and after failure under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions are examined. The micrographs indicate that the failure modes of the 5754 spot friction welds under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions are quite different. The dominant kinked fatigue cracks for the final failures of the welds under cyclic loading conditions are identified. Based on the experimental observations of the paths of the dominant kinked fatigue cracks, a fatigue life estimation model based on the stress intensity factor solutions for finite kinked cracks is adopted to estimate the fatigue lives of the welds.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-1138
Van-Xuan Tran, Jwo Pan, Tsung-Yu Pan
Abstract In this investigation, dissimilar 5754/7075 and 7075/5754 spot friction welds were first made under different processing conditions. The spot friction welds in lap-shear specimens were tested under quasi-static loading conditions. The optimal processing times to maximize the failure loads of the 5754/7075 and 7075/5754 welds under lap-shear loading conditions are identified. The maximum failure load of the 7075/5754 welds is about 40% larger than that of the 5754/7075 welds. Optical micrographs of both types of spot friction welds made at different processing times before and after failure are examined. The micrographs show different weld geometries and different failure modes of spot friction welds made at different processing times. The failure modes of the 5754/7075 and 7075/5754 spot friction welds appear to be quite complex and strongly depend on the geometry and the strength of the interfacial surface between the two deformed sheet materials.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0508
Dong Wook Lee, Zheng-Dong Ma, Noboru Kikuchi
In the I-bumper (inflatable bumper) concept [1], two explosive airbags are released just before the main body-to-body crash in order to absorb the kinetic energy of colliding vehicles. The release also actuates other components in the I-bumper, including a movable bumper and an energy absorption morphing lattice structure. A small explosive charge will be used to deploy the airbag. A conventional airbag model will be used to reduce the crash energy in a controlled manner and reduce the peak impact force. An analytic model of the explosive airbag is developed in this paper for the I-bumper system and for its optimal design, while the complete system design (I-bumper) will be discussed in a separate paper. Analytical formulations for an explosive airbag will be developed and major design variables will be identified. These are used to determine the required amount of explosive and predict airbag behavior, as well to predict their impact on the I-bumper system.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0726
Dohoy Jung, Dennis N. Assanis
Compact heat exchangers have been widely used in various applications in thermal fluid systems including automotive thermal management systems. Radiators for engine cooling systems, evaporators and condensers for HVAC systems, oil coolers, and intercoolers are typical examples of the compact heat exchangers that can be found in ground vehicles. Among the different types of heat exchangers for engine cooling applications, cross flow compact heat exchangers with louvered fins are of special interest because of their higher heat rejection capability with the lower flow resistance. In this study, a predictive numerical model for the cross flow type heat exchanger with louvered fins has been developed based on the thermal resistance concept and the finite difference method in order to provide a design and development tool for the heat exchanger. The model was validated with the experimental data from an engine cooling radiator.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0698
Suzanne G. Hoffman, Don B. Chaffin, David W. Wagner
Posture selection during standing exertions is a complex process involving tradeoffs between muscle strength and balance. Bodyweight utilization reduces the amount of upper-body strength required to perform a high force push/pull exertion but shifts the center-of-gravity towards the limits of the functional stability region. Thus balance constraints limit the extent to which bodyweight can be used to generate push/pull forces. This paper examines a two-handed sagittal plane pulling exertion performed during a battery maintenance task on a member of the family of medium-sized tactical vehicles (FMTV). Percent capable strength predictions and functional balance capabilities were determined for various two-handed pulling postures using the University of Michigan's 3D Static Strength Prediction Program (3DSSPP). Through this simulation study, preferred postures that minimize joint torques while maintaining balance were identified.
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