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Viewing 1 to 30 of 37
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0725
Zissimos Mourelatos, Jing Li, Vijitashwa Pandey, Amandeep Singh, Matthew Castanier, David A. Lamb
Understanding reliability is critical in design, maintenance and durability analysis of engineering systems. A reliability simulation methodology is presented in this paper for vehicle fleets using limited data. The method can be used to estimate the reliability of non-repairable as well as repairable systems. It can optimally allocate, based on a target system reliability, individual component reliabilities using a multi-objective optimization algorithm. The algorithm establishes a Pareto front that can be used for optimal tradeoff between reliability and the associated cost. The method uses Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the system failure rate and reliability as a function of time. The probability density functions (PDF) of the time between failures for all components of the system are estimated using either limited data or a user-supplied MTBF (mean time between failures) and its coefficient of variation.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0752
Kumar B. Kulkarni, Jaisankar Ramalingam, Ravi Thyagarajan
It is of considerable interest to developers of military vehicles, in early phases of the concept design process as well as in Analysis of Alternatives (AoA) phase, to quickly predict occupant injury risk due to under-body blast loading. The most common occupant injuries in these extremely short duration events arise out of the very high vertical acceleration of vehicle due to its close proximity to hot high pressure gases from the blast. In a prior study [16], an extensive parametric study was conducted in a systematic manner so as to create look-up tables or automated software tools that decision-makers can use to quickly estimate the different injury responses for both stroking and non-stroking seat systems in terms of a suitable blast load parameter. The primary objective of this paper is to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of using such a tool in lieu of building a detailed model for simulation and occupant injury assessment.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0719
Vijitashwa Pandey, Zissimos Mourelatos, Matthew Castanier
Implications of decision analysis (DA) on engineering design are important and well-documented. However, widespread adoption has not occurred. To that end, the authors recently proposed decision topologies (DT) as a visual method for representing decision situations and proved that they are entirely consistent with normative decision analysis. This paper addresses the practical issue of assessing the DTs of a designer using their responses. As in classical DA, this step is critical to encoding the DA's preferences so that further analysis and mathematical optimization can be performed on the correct set of preferences. We show how multi-attribute DTs can be directly assessed from DM responses. Furthermore, we show that preferences under uncertainty can be trivially incorporated and that topologies can be constructed using single attribute topologies similarly to multi-linear functions in utility analysis. This incremental construction simplifies the process of topology construction.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0717
Igor Baseski, Dorin Drignei, Zissimos Mourelatos, Monica Majcher
We propose a new metamodeling method to characterize the output (response) random process of a dynamic system with random parameters, excited by input random processes. The metamodel can be then used to efficiently estimate the time-dependent reliability of a dynamic system using analytical or simulation-based methods. The metamodel is constructed by decomposing the input random processes using principal components or wavelets and then using a few simulations to estimate the distributions of the decomposition coefficients. A similar decomposition is also performed on the output random process. A kriging model is then established between the input and output decomposition coefficients and subsequently used to quantify the output random process corresponding to a realization of the input random parameters and random processes. What distinguishes our approach from others in metamodeling is that the system input is not deterministic but random.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0439
Daniel B. Kosinski
Abstract The current reliability growth planning model used by the US Army, the Planning Model for Projection Methodology (PM2), is insufficient for the needs of the Army. This paper will detail the limitations of PM2 that cause Army programs to develop reliability growth plans that incorporate unrealistic assumptions and often demand that infeasible levels of reliability be achieved. In addition to this, another reliability growth planning model being developed to address some of these limitations, the Bayesian Continuous Planning Model (BCPM), will be discussed along with its own limitations. This paper will also cover a third reliability growth planning model that is being developed which incorporates the advantageous features of PM2 and BCPM but replaces the unrealistic assumptions with more realistic and customizable ones.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0425
Monica Majcher, Zissimos P. Mourelatos, Vasileios Geroulas, Igor Baseski, Amandeep Singh
Abstract Using the total probability theorem, we propose a method to calculate the failure rate of a linear vibratory system with random parameters excited by stationary Gaussian processes. The response of such a system is non-stationary because of the randomness of the input parameters. A space-filling design, such as optimal symmetric Latin hypercube sampling or maximin, is first used to sample the input parameter space. For each design point, the output process is stationary and Gaussian. We present two approaches to calculate the corresponding conditional probability of failure. A Kriging metamodel is then created between the input parameters and the output conditional probabilities allowing us to estimate the conditional probabilities for any set of input parameters. The total probability theorem is finally applied to calculate the time-dependent probability of failure and the failure rate of the dynamic system. The proposed method is demonstrated using a vibratory system.
2014-09-30
Journal Article
2014-01-2322
Vladimir V. Vantsevich, Jeremy P. Gray, Dennis Murphy
Abstract Through inverse dynamics-based modeling and computer simulations for a 6×6 Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) - a 6×6 truck - in stochastic terrain conditions, this paper analytically presents a coupled impact of different driveline system configurations and a suspension design on vehicle dynamics, including vehicle mobility, and energy efficiency. A new approach in this research work involves an estimation of each axle contribution to the level of potential mobility loss/increase and/or energy consumption increase/ reduction. As it is shown, the drive axles of the vehicle interfere with the vehicle's dynamics through the distribution of the wheels' normal reactions and wheel torques. The interference causes the independent system dynamics to become operationally coupled/fused and thus diminishes vehicle mobility and energy efficiency. The analysis is done by the use of new mobility indices and energy efficiency indices which are functionally coupled/fused.
2014-05-10
Journal Article
2014-01-9121
Robert E Smith, Edward Lumsdaine
Since transient vehicle HVAC computational fluids (CFD) simulations take too long to solve in a production environment, the goal of this project is to automatically create a lumped-parameter flow network from a steady-state CFD that solves nearly instantaneously. The data mining algorithm k-means is implemented to automatically discover flow features and form the network (a reduced order model). The lumped-parameter network is implemented in the commercial thermal solver MuSES to then run as a fully transient simulation. Using this network a “localized heat transfer coefficient” is shown to be an improvement over existing techniques. Also, it was found that the use of the clustering created a new flow visualization technique. Finally, fixing clusters near equipment newly demonstrates a capability to track localized temperatures near specific objects (such as equipment in vehicles).
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-0605
Brian David Dykas, Denise M. Rizzo, Doug Fussner, Randy McDonnell, Mark Riggs
A dynamometer test methodology was developed for evaluation of HMMWV axle efficiency with hypoid gearsets, comparing those having various degrees of superfinish versus new production axles as well as used axles removed at depot maintenance. To ensure real-world applicability, a HMMWV variant vehicle model was created and simulated over a peacetime vehicle duty cycle, which was developed to represent a mission scenario. In addition, tractive effort calculations were then used to determine the maximum input torques. The drive cycle developed above was modified into two different profiles having varying degrees of torque variability to determine if the degree of variability would have a significant influence on efficiency in the transient dynamometer tests. Additionally, steady state efficiency performance is measured at four input pinion speeds from 700-2500 rpm, five input torques from 50 - 400 N⋅m, and two sump temperatures, 80°C and 110°C.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1385
Dorin Drignei, Zissimos Mourelatos, Vijitashwa Pandey, Igor Baseski, Michael Kokkolaras, Amandeep Singh, David Lamb
Design optimization often relies on computational models, which are subjected to a validation process to ensure their accuracy. Because validation of computer models in the entire design space can be costly, we have previously proposed an approach where design optimization and model validation, are concurrently performed using a sequential approach with variable-size local domains. We used test data and statistical bootstrap methods to size each local domain where the prediction model is considered validated and where design optimization is performed. The method proceeds iteratively until the optimum design is obtained. This method however, requires test data to be available in each local domain along the optimization path. In this paper, we refine our methodology by using polynomial regression to predict the size and shape of a local domain at some steps along the optimization process without using test data.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1192
Ahmed A. Shabana, Paramsothy Jayakumar, Michael Letherwood
This paper discusses a new Department of Defense (DoD) initiative focused on the development of new generation of MBS computer software that have capabilities and features that are not provided by existing MBS software technology. This three-decade old technology fails to meet new challenges of developing more detailed models in which the effects of significant changes in geometry and large deformations cannot be ignored. New applications require accurate continuum mechanics based vehicle/soil interaction models, belt and chain drive models, efficient and accurate continuum based tire models, cable models used in rescue missions, models that accurately capture large deformations due to thermal and excessive loads, more accurate bio-mechanics models for ligaments, muscles, and soft tissues (LMST), etc.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1191
Dan Negrut, Daniel Melanz, Hammad Mazhar, David Lamb, Paramsothy Jayakumar, Michael Letherwood
This paper presents a computational framework for the physics-based simulation of light vehicles operating on discrete terrain. The focus is on characterizing through simulation the mobility of vehicles that weigh 1000 pounds or less, such as a reconnaissance robot. The terrain is considered to be deformable and is represented as a collection of bodies of spherical shape. The modeling stage relies on a novel formulation of the frictional contact problem that requires at each time step of the numerical simulation the solution of an optimization problem. The proposed computational framework, when run on ubiquitous Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards, allows the simulation of systems in which the terrain is represented by more than 0.5 million bodies leading to problems with more than one million degrees of freedom.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0725
Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Matthew Castanier, Nicholas Stowe, Eric Maes
In this paper a Multi-Level System (MLS) optimization algorithm is presented and utilized for the multi-discipline design of a ground vehicle track. The MLS can guide the decision making process for designing a complex system where many alternatives and many mutually competing objectives and disciplines need to be considered and evaluated. Mathematical relationships between the design variables and the multiple discipline performance objectives are developed adaptively as the various design considerations are evaluated and as the design is being evolved. These relationships are employed for rewarding performance improvement during the decision making process by allocating more resources to the disciplines which exhibit the higher level of improvement. The track analysis demonstrates how a multi-discipline design approach can be pursued in ground vehicle applications.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0914
Vijitashwa Pandey, Zissimos Mourelatos, Efstratios Nikolaidis, Matthew Castanier, David Lamb
Reaching a system level reliability target is an inverse problem. Component level reliabilities are determined for a required system level reliability. Because this inverse problem does not have a unique solution, one approach is to tradeoff system reliability with cost and to allow the designer to select a design with a target system reliability, using his/her preferences. In this case, the component reliabilities are readily available from the calculation of the reliability-cost tradeoff. To arrive at the set of solutions to be traded off, one encounters two problems. First, the system reliability calculation is based on repeated system simulations where each system state, indicating which components work and which have failed, is tested to determine if it causes system failure, and second, the task of eliciting and encoding the decision maker's preferences is extremely difficult because of uncertainty in modeling the decision maker's preferences.
1996-02-01
Technical Paper
960773
Peter Schihl, Walter Bryzik, Arvind Atreya
A phenomenological zero-dimensional spray penetration model was developed for diesel-type conditions for a constant volume chamber. The spray was modeled as a protruding cone which is well-mixed at its tip after passing through initial primary and secondary breakup zones. The resulting cone model is strictly dependent on injection parameters; density ratio, injection and chamber pressure, nozzle characteristics, and cone angle. The proposed model was compared with data from three different sources and performed well in most cases except for low density environments.
1996-02-01
Technical Paper
961040
Peter Schihl, Walter Bryzik, Arvind Atreya
The methodology for predicting the transient mixing rate is presented for a direct injection, quiescent chamber diesel. The mixing process is modeled as a zero-dimensional, large-scale phenomena which accounts for injection rate, cylinder geometry, and engine operating condition. As a demonstration, two different injection schemes were investigated for engine speeds of 1600, 2100, and 2600 rpm. In the first case, the air-fuel ratio was fixed while the injection rate was allowed to vary, but for the second case, the injection duration was fixed and the air-fuel ratio was allowed to vary. For the former case, the resulting mixing rate was also compared with the experimentally determined fuel burning rate. These two quantities appeared to be correlated in some manner for the various engine speeds under investigation.
2006-11-07
Technical Paper
2006-01-3039
Jason Ueda, David Daniszewski, John Monroe, Abul Masrur, Michelle Charbeneau, Eric Jochum, Rakesh Patel
This paper describes modeling and simulation technologies used to simulate the electrical systems of Army vehicles using Matlab/Simulink coupled with graphical user interface software. The models were built using Mathworks' Matlab/Simulink software in conjunction with the SimPowerSystems Toolbox, a toolkit provided by Mathworks that provides models of basic electrical components such as capacitors and inductors, in addition to more advanced components such as diodes and IGBT's. The current results of this ongoing effort are presented and discussed.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0841
Brooke Haueisen, Paul Muench, Greg Hudas, James Overholt, Peter Adamczyk, Greg Hulbert
With the recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, it is increasingly evident that the demands of warfare are changing and the need for innovative mobility systems is growing. In the rough, unstructured terrain that the soldiers encounter, they have reverted to using mules and donkeys to move stealthily and quickly. In light of the growing need for autonomous systems, the Army is looking at the possibility of legged mobility options such as gasoline powered quadrupeds to traverse the off-road terrain. As technology advances, the era of military bipeds may well be in sight. However, current bipedal robotic technology is far too inefficient for battlefield use. Much of this inefficiency stems from actuated control of each limb's motion throughout the entire gait cycle. An alternative approach is to exploit the passive pendular dynamics of legs and legged bodies for energy savings. This paper compares and contrasts fully-actuated walking with passive walking.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0844
Brooke Haueisen, Greg Hudas, Dave Gorsich, Richard Ahlvin, Randolph Jones, Jody Priddy, George Mason, Greg Hulbert
The NATO Reference Mobility Model (NRMM)[1] is the primary mobility software used by the US Department of Defense, its contractors and NATO countries to evaluate various metrics of proposed vehicle systems for acquisition. The NRMM is a vehicle mobility performance model developed in the 1970's[2] that combines mobility related technologies into one comprehensive software package designed to predict the physically constrained vehicle and terrain interaction while operating in both on and off road environments. The empirically based relationships within NRMM are measurements taken from actual vehicles run over a variety of terrains and are geared towards vehicles weighing more than 1500 pounds. As the Army focuses on a lighter, faster and more mobile fighting force, standard military vehicles are decreasing in size with many newultra lightweight autonomous systems being designed.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8041
Richard A. Romano, George D. Park, Victor Paul, R. Wade Allen
Abstract Motion cueing algorithms can improve the perceived realism of a driving simulator, however, data on the effects on driver performance and simulator sickness remain scarce. Two novel motion cueing algorithms varying in concept and complexity were developed for a limited maneuvering workspace, hexapod/Stuart type motion platform. The RideCue algorithm uses a simple swing motion concept while OverTilt Track algorithm uses optimal pre-positioning to account for maneuver characteristics for coordinating tilt adjustments. An experiment was conducted on the US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) Ride Motion Simulator (RMS) platform comparing the two novel motion cueing algorithms to a pre-existing algorithm and a no-motion condition.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0312
Robert S. Jane, Gordon G. Parker, Wayne Weaver, Denise M. Rizzo
Abstract Vehicles with power exporting capability are microgrids since they possess electrical power generation, onboard loads, energy storage, and the ability to interconnect. The unique load and silent watch requirements of some military vehicles make them particularly well-suited to augment stationary power grids to increase power resiliency and capability. Connecting multiple vehicles in a peer-to-peer arrangement or to a stationary grid requires scalable power management strategies to accommodate the possibly large numbers of assets. This paper describes a military ground vehicle power management scheme for vehicle-to-grid applications. The particular focus is overall fuel consumption reduction of the mixed asset inventory of military vehicles with diesel generators typically used in small unit outposts.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0311
Umashankar Mohan Chandra Joshi, Manan Jyotin Trivedi, Ziliang Zheng, Peter Schihl, Naeim A. Henein
All previous correlations of the ignition delay (ID) period in diesel combustion show a positive activation energy, which means that shorter ID periods are achieved at higher charge temperatures. This is not the case in the autoignition of most homogeneous hydrocarbons-air mixtures where they experience the NTC (Negative Temperature Coefficient ) regime in the intermediate temperature range, from about 800 K to 1000 K). Here, the autoignition reactions slow down and longer ID periods are experienced at higher temperatures. Accordingly the global activation energy for the autoignition reactions of homogeneous mixtures should vary from positive to negative values.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0316
Dorin Drignei, Zissimos Mourelatos, Ervisa Kosova, Jingwen Hu, Matthew Reed, Jonathan Rupp, Rebekah Gruber, Risa Scherer
Abstract We have recently obtained experimental data and used them to develop computational models to quantify occupant impact responses and injury risks for military vehicles during frontal crashes. The number of experimental tests and model runs are however, relatively small due to their high cost. While this is true across the auto industry, it is particularly critical for the Army and other government agencies operating under tight budget constraints. In this study we investigate through statistical simulations how the injury risk varies if a large number of experimental tests were conducted. We show that the injury risk distribution is skewed to the right implying that, although most physical tests result in a small injury risk, there are occasional physical tests for which the injury risk is extremely large. We compute the probabilities of such events and use them to identify optimum design conditions to minimize such probabilities.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0308
Tomasz A. Haupt, Angela E. Card, Matthew Doude, Michael S. Mazzola, Scott Shurin, Alan Hufnagel
Abstract The Powertrain Analysis and Computational Environment (PACE) is a forward-looking powertrain simulation tool that is ready for a High-Performance Computing (HPC) environment. The code, written in C++, is one actor in a comprehensive ground vehicle co-simulation architecture being developed by the CREATE-GV program. PACE provides an advanced behavioral modeling capability for the powertrain subsystem of a conventional or hybrid-electric vehicle that exploits the idea of reusable vehicle modeling that underpins the Autonomie modeling environment developed by the Argonne National Laboratory. PACE permits the user to define a powertrain in Autonomie, which requires a single desktop license for MATLAB/Simulink, and port it to a cluster computer where PACE runs with an open-source BSD-3 license so that it can be distributed to as many nodes as needed.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0307
Weiran Jiang, Alyssa Bennett, Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Matthew Castanier, Ravi Thyagarajan
Abstract Assessing the dynamic performance of multilayer plates subjected to impulsive loading is of interest for identifying configurations that either absorb energy or transmit the energy in the transverse directions, thereby mitigating the through-thickness energy propagation. A reduced-order modeling approach is presented in this paper for rapidly evaluating the structural dynamic performance of various multilayer plate designs. The new approach is based on the reverberation matrix method (RMM) with the theory of generalized rays for fast analysis of the structural dynamic characteristics of multilayer plates. In the RMM model, the waves radiated from the dynamic load are reflected and refracted at each interface between layers, and the waves within each layer are transmitted with a phase lag. These two phenomena are represented by the global scattering matrix and the global phase matrix, respectively.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0209
Themistoklis Koutsellis, Zissimos Mourelatos, Mohammad Hijawi, Huairui Guo, Matthew Castanier
Abstract Warranty forecasting of repairable systems is very important for manufacturers of mass produced systems. It is desired to predict the Expected Number of Failures (ENF) after a censoring time using collected failure data before the censoring time. Moreover, systems may be produced with a defective component resulting in extensive warranty costs even after the defective component is detected and replaced with a new design. In this paper, we present a forecasting method to predict the ENF of a repairable system using observed data which is used to calibrate a Generalized Renewal Processes (GRP) model. Manufacturing of products may exhibit different production patterns with different failure statistics through time. For example, vehicles produced in different months may have different failure intensities because of supply chain differences or different skills of production workers, for example.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0206
Monica Majcher, Zissimos Mourelatos, Vasiliki Tsianika
Abstract Recent developments in time-dependent reliability have introduced the concept of a composite limit state. The composite limit state method can be used to calculate the time-dependent probability of failure for dynamic systems with limit-state functions of input random variables, input random processes and explicit in time. The probability of failure can be calculated exactly using the composite limit state if the instantaneous limit states are linear, forming an open or close polytope, and are functions of only two random variables. In this work, the restriction on the number of random variables is lifted. The proposed algorithm is accurate and efficient for linear instantaneous limit state functions of any number of random variables. An example on the design of a hydrokinetic turbine blade under time-dependent river flow load demonstrates the accuracy of the proposed general composite limit state approach.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0264
Venkatesh Babu, Ravi Thyagarajan, Jaisankar Ramalingam
Abstract In this paper, the capability of three methods of modelling detonation of high explosives (HE) buried in soil viz., (1) coupled discrete element & particle gas methods (DEM-PGM) (2) Structured - Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (S-ALE), and (3) Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE), are investigated. The ALE method of modeling the effects of buried charges in soil is well known and widely used in blast simulations today [1]. Due to high computational costs, inconsistent robustness and long run times, alternate modeling methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) [2, 9] and DEM are gaining more traction. In all these methods, accuracy of the analysis relies not only on the fidelity of the soil and high explosive models but also on the robustness of fluid-structure interaction. These high-fidelity models are also useful in generating fast running models (FRM) useful for rapid generation of blast simulation results of acceptable accuracy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0260
Yuanying Wang, Heath Hofmann, Denise Rizzo, Scott Shurin
Abstract This paper presents a computationally-efficient model of heat convection due to air circulation produced by rotor motion in the air gap of an electric machine. The model calculates heat flux at the boundaries of the rotor and stator as a function of the rotor and stator temperatures and rotor speed. It is shown that, under certain assumptions, this mapping has the homogeneity property. This property, among others, is used to pose a structure for the proposed model. The coefficients of the model are then determined by fitting the model to the results of a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation program. The accuracy of the new model is compared to the CFD results, shown an error of less than 0.3% over the studied operating range.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0273
Chris Goodin, Jeremy Mange, Sara Pace, Thomas Skorupa, Daniel Kedziorek, Jody Priddy, Larry Lynch
Abstract Mercury is a high-fidelity, physics-based object-oriented software for conducting simulations of vehicle performance evaluations for requirements and engineering metrics. Integrating cutting-edge, massively parallel modeling techniques for soft, cohesive and dry granular soil that will integrate state-of-the-art soil simulation with high-fidelity multi-body dynamics and powertrain modeling to provide a comprehensive mobility simulator for ground vehicles. The Mercury implements the Chrono::Vehicle dynamics library for vehicle dynamics, which provides multi-body dynamic simulation of wheeled and tracked vehicles. The powertrain is modeled using the Powertrain Analysis Computational Environment (PACE), a behavior-based powertrain analysis based on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Autonomie software. Vehicle -terrain interaction (VTI) is simulated with the Ground Contact Element (GCE), which provides forces to the Chrono-vehicle solver.
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