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Viewing 1 to 30 of 62
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1625
John G. Cherng, Qian Xi, Pravansu Mohanty, Gordon Ebbitt
Acoustical materials are widely used in automotive vehicles and other industrial applications. Two important parameters namely Sound Transmission Loss (STL) and absorption coefficient are commonly used to evaluate the acoustical performance of these materials. Other parameters, such as insertion loss, noise reduction, and loss factors are also used to judge their performance depending on the application of these materials. A systematic comparative study of STL and absorption coefficient was conducted on various porous acoustical materials. Several dozen materials including needled cotton fiber (shoddy) and foam materials with or without barrier/scrim were investigated. The results of STL and absorption coefficient are presented and compared. As expected, it was found that most of materials are either good in STL or good in absorption. However, some combinations can achieve a balance of performance in both categories.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0784
Catherine Amodeo, Jwo Pan
The failure modes of gas metal arc welds in notched lap-shear specimens of high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel are investigated. Notched lap-shear specimens of gas metal arc welds were first made. Quasi-static test results of the notched lap-shear specimens showed two failure locations for the welds. The specimens cut from coupons with shorter weld lengths failed near the weld root whereas the specimens cut from coupons with longer weld lengths failed near the weld toe. Micro-hardness tests were conducted in order to provide an assessment of the mechanical properties of the base metal, the heat affected zone, and the weld metal. In order to understand the failure modes of these welds, finite element models were developed with the geometric characteristics of the weld metals and heat affected zones designed to match those of the micrographs of the cross sections for the long and short welds.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0984
Aledoni Keci, Nia R. Harrison, S. George Luckey
Abstract The aluminum alloy 7075-T6 has the potential to be used for structural automotive body components as an alternative to boron steel. Although this alloy shows poor formability at room temperature, it has been demonstrated that hot stamping is a feasible sheet metal process that can be used to overcome the forming issues. Hot stamping is an elevated temperature forming operation in which a hot blank is formed and quenched within a stamping die. Attaining a high quench rate is a critical step of the hot stamping process and corresponds to maximum strength and corrosion resistance. This work looks at measuring the quench rate of AA7075-T6 by way of three different approaches: water, a water-cooled plate, and a bead die. The water-cooled plate and the bead die are laboratory-scale experimental setups designed to replicate the hot stamping/die quenching process.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0535
P.-C. Lin, J. Pan, D.-A. Wang
The analytic solution of the mode I stress intensity factor for spot welds in lap-shear specimens is investigated based on the classical Kirchhoff plate theory for linear elastic materials. Approximate closed-form solutions for a finite square plate containing a rigid inclusion under counter bending conditions are first derived. Based on the J integral, the closed-form structural stress solution is used to develop the analytic solution of the mode I stress intensity factor for spot welds in lap-shear specimens of finite size. Finally, the analytic solution of the mode I stress intensity factor based on the stress solution for a finite square plate with an inclusion is compared with the results of the three-dimensional finite element computations for lap-shear specimens with various ratios of the specimen half width to the nugget radius.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0319
Larry A. Godlewski, Xuming Su, John E. Allison, Peter Gustafson, Tresa M. Pollock
Quantification of residual stresses is an important engineering problem impacting manufacturabilty and durability of metallic components. An area of particular concern is residual stresses that can develop during heat treatment of metallic components. Many heat treatments, especially in heat treatable cast aluminum alloys, involve a water-quenching step immediately after a solution-treatment cycle. This rapid water quench has the potential to induce high residual stresses in regions of the castings that experience large thermal gradients. These stresses may be partially relaxed during the aging portion of the heat treatment. The goal of this research was to develop a test sample and quench technique to quantify the stresses created by steep thermal gradients during rapid quenching of cast aluminum. The development and relaxation of residual stresses during the aging cycle was studied experimentally with the use of strain gauges.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0537
Hong Tae Kang, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Xuming Su, Yung-Li Lee, Mingchao Guo, Chonghua Jiang, Zhen Li
Abstract Due to magnesium alloy's poor weldability, other joining techniques such as laser assisted self-piercing rivet (LSPR) are used for joining magnesium alloys. This research investigates the fatigue performance of LSPR for magnesium alloys including AZ31 and AM60. Tensile-shear and coach peel specimens for AZ31 and AM60 were fabricated and tested for understanding joint fatigue performance. A structural stress - life (S-N) method was used to develop the fatigue parameters from load-life test results. In order to validate this approach, test results from multijoint specimens were compared with the predicted fatigue results of these specimens using the structural stress method. The fatigue results predicted using the structural stress method correlate well with the test results.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0541
Zhigang Wei, Pingsha Dong
Engineering components and systems are usually subjected to mixed-mode and multiaxial fatigue loadings, and these conditions should be considered in product durability and reliability design and the maintenance of aging equipment, especially mission-critical components and systems. However, modeling the damage and degradation processes under these complex loading conditions is difficult and challenging task because not only the concepts, such as range, mean, peak, valley etc., developed for uniaxial loading usually cannot be directly transferred to mixed-mode and multiaxial loadings, but also some very unique phenomena related to these complex loading conditions. One such a phenomenon is the loading path effect that can be simply described as: out-of-phase loading is more damaging than in-phase loading for some ductile materials.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0706
Zheng-Ming Su, Pai-Chen Lin, Wei-Jen Lai, Jwo Pan
Abstract In this paper, failure modes of dissimilar laser welds in lap-shear specimens of low carbon steel and high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel sheets are investigated based on experimental observations. Micro-hardness tests across the weld zones of dissimilar laser welds were conducted. The hardness values of the fusion zones and heat affected zones are significantly higher than those of the base metals. The fatigue lives and the corresponding failure modes of laser welds as functions of the load ranges are then examined. Optical micrographs of the laser welds before and after failure under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions are then examined. The failure modes and fatigue behaviors of the laser welds under different loading conditions are different. Under quasi-static loading conditions, a necking failure occurred in the upper low carbon steel sheet far away from the laser weld.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0644
Kyoo Sil Choi, Dongsheng Li, Xin Sun, Mei Li, John Allison
In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility.
2013-09-24
Technical Paper
2013-01-2357
Zhigang Wei, Jason Hamilton, Fulun Yang, Limin Luo, Shengbin Lin, HongTae Kang, Pingsha Dong
Great efforts have been made to develop the ability to accurately and quickly predict the durability and reliability of vehicles in the early development stage, especially for welded joints, which are usually the weakest locations in a vehicle system. A reliable and validated life assessment method is needed to accurately predict how and where a welded part fails, while iterative testing is expensive and time consuming. Recently, structural stress methods based on nodal force/moment are becoming widely accepted in fatigue life assessment of welded structures. There are several variants of structural stress approaches available and two of the most popular methods being used in automotive industry are the Volvo method and the Verity method. Both methods are available in commercial software and some concepts and procedures related the nodal force/moment have already been included in several engineering codes.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-0524
Zhigang Wei, Fulun Yang, Limin Luo, Katherine Avery, Pingsha Dong
Structural stress methods are now widely used in fatigue life assessment of welded structures and structures with stress concentrations. The structural stress concept is based on the assumption of a global stress distribution at critical locations such as weld toes or weld throats, and there are several variants of structural stress approaches available. In this paper, the linear traction stress approach, a nodal force based structural stress approach, is reviewed first. The linear traction stress approach offers a robust procedure for extracting linear traction stress components by post-processing the finite element analysis results at any given hypothetical crack location of interest. Pertinent concepts such as mesh-insensitivity, master S-N curve, fatigue crack initiation and growth mechanisms are also discussed.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980470
Peter Reppe, Gregory Keoleian, Rebecca Messick, Mia Costic
This paper describes a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) done to evaluate the relative environmental performance of magnesium (Mg) and aluminum (Al) automatic transmission cases. Magnesium is considered a lighter weight substitute for aluminum in this application. Light weighting of vehicles increases fuel economy and is an important vehicle design metric. The objective of this LCA is to quantify energy and other environmental trade-offs associated with each alternative for material production, manufacturing, use, and end-of-life management stages. Key features of the inventory modeling and the data collection and analysis methods are included in this paper along with life cycle inventory profiles of aluminum and magnesium alternatives. The life cycle inventory (LCI) was interpreted using a set of environmental metrics and areas needing further research were identified. A qualitative cost assessment was done in conjunction with this LCA to highlight potential cost drivers.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980865
S. G. Liter, D. R. Burgess, M. Kaviany, J. T. Wang, J. Kang
A model is presented in which distinction is made between the contributions of the different mechanisms of heat transfer to an air bag fabric during deployment. An experimental setup, designed for simulation and recording of the thermal response of permeable and coated (impermeable) air bag fabrics, is described. Comparisons between the experimental results and numerical predictions show fair agreement. The preliminary results show that the model provides a framework in which the interplay between the three convective heat transfer coefficients (two surface and one volumetric) that affect the fabric temperature (and the heat loss from the upstream bag gas) can be examined. Currently the magnitude of these surface convective heat fluxes are being examined experimentally.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980090
K.Y. Sohn, J.A. Yurko, J.W. Jones, J.E. Kearns, J.E. Allison
The effect of temperature and preload on the bolt load retention (BLR) behavior of AZ91D and AE42 magnesium die castings was investigated. The results were compared to those of 380 aluminum die castings. Test temperatures from 125 to 175°C and preloads from 7 to 28 kN were investigated. The loss of preload for AZ91D was more sensitive to temperature than that observed for AE42, especially at low preloads. In general, retained bolt-load was lowest in AZ91D. All test assemblies were preloaded at room temperature and load levels increased when the assemblies reached test temperature. The load-increase was dependent on the preload level, test temperature, alloy, and results from thermal expansion mismatch between the steel bolt and the magnesium alloy components, mitigated by the onset of primary creep. Thermal exposure (aging) of AZ91D at 150°C improved BLR behavior.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
971063
S. G. Liter, M. Kaviany, J. T. Wang
The permeability of some airbag fabrics is determined, along with the Ergun coefficient signifying departure from purely viscous flow, from gas flow rates and pressure drop measurements. The dependency of these coefficients on the fabric temperature is also examined. Preliminary results are reported on the transient response of these fabrics to temporal changes in the gas flow rate and temperature. The temperature history is measured and compared with the predictions of some simple models. The models make various assumptions regarding the microscale of the fabrics. The preliminary results show that the very fine microscales do not control the time response of the fabric.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970325
F. C. Chen, J. W. Jones, T. A. McGinn, J. E. Kearns, A. J. Nielsen, J. E. Allison
New high-temperature Mg alloys are being considered to replace 380 Al in transmission cases, wherein bolt-load retention, and creep, is of prime concern. One of these alloys is die cast AE42, which has much better creep properties than does AZ91D but is still not as creep resistant as 380 Al. It is thus important to investigate bolt-load retention and creep of AE42 as an initial step in assessing its suitability as a material for transmission housings. To that end, the bolt-load retention behavior of die-cast AE42, AZ91D and 380 Al have been examined using standard M10 bolts specially instrumented with stable high-temperature strain gages. The bolt-load retention test pieces were die cast in geometries approximating the flange and boss regions in typical bolted joints. Bolt-load retention properties were examined as a function of time (at least 100 hours), temperature (150 and 175 °C) and initial bolt preload (14 to 34 kN).
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920164
Daniel J. Kathios, Robert M. Ziff, Algis A. Petrulis, John C. Bonczyk
The automobile industry has been using high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as a material to fabricate fuel tanks. Because untreated HDPE is permeable to the primary constituents of gasoline, these fuel tanks are now being produced with various barrier technologies that significantly reduce this permeation rate. Four currently available barrier technologies are fluorination, sulfonation, coextrusion, and the laminar barrier technology. These technologies have successfully proven to decrease the permeation rate of pure gasoline. However, it is suspected that their effectiveness may be reduced when alcohols are introduced into the fuel blend. In this work, we determine the permeation rates of gasoline-alcohol fuel blends through HDPE by conducting tests on 22-gallon HDPE fuel tanks and on small HDPE bottles fabricated with and without these barrier technologies. The goal of this study is to provide a comprehensive evaluation of these four barrier technologies.
1996-02-01
Technical Paper
960410
K. Kar, G. A. Keoleian
Life cycle design (LCD) is a framework for designing product systems which are both economically and ecologically sustainable. Key elements of this framework are systems analysis, multicriteria analysis and multistakeholder participation. This paper illustrates the application of life cycle design for a comparative evaluation of a prototype sand-cast 2.0 l aluminum manifold for the 1995 Ford Contour and a 2.0 l equivalent of the 1.9 l multi-tube brazed aluminum manifold for the 1995 Ford Escort. A life cycle inventory analysis was performed for the intake manifolds by evaluating the energy and wastes in the raw material acquisition, material processing, manufacturing, use and retirement stages. The environmental data for the two manifolds were integrated with life cycle cost and performance data to enhance product design and decision making.
1998-11-30
Technical Paper
982224
Robert D. Stephens, Ronald L. Williams, Gregory A. Keoleian, Sabrina Spatari, Robb Beal
Federal standards that mandate improved fuel economy have resulted in the increased use of lightweight materials in automotive applications. However, the environmental burdens associated with a product extend well beyond the use phase. Life cycle assessment is the science of determining the environmental burdens associated with the entire life cycle of a given product from cradle-to-grave. This report documents the environmental burdens associated with every phase of the life cycle of two fuel tanks utilized in full-sized 1996 GM vans. These vans are manufactured in two configurations, one which utilizes a steel fuel tank, and the other a multi-layered plastic fuel tank consisting primarily of high density polyethylene (HDPE). This study was a collaborative effort between GM and the University of Michigan's National Pollution Prevention Center, which received funding from EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory.
2005-06-14
Technical Paper
2005-01-2712
M. A. Bhatti, Ray P.S. Han, Ryan Vignes
Since muscles act to translate an electrical impulse from the central nervous system into motion, it is essential to have a suitable mathematical model for muscles and groups of muscles for a virtual soldier environment. This paper presents a methodology in which the muscle contraction is broken down into three distinct physiological processes: calcium release and re-absorption by the sarcoplasmic reticulum, the rate at which calcium binds and unbinds to troponin, and the generation of force due to cross-bridge cycling and the elasticity of the muscle fibers. These processes have been successfully modeled by Ding and Wexler as a system of coupled differential and algebraic equations. These equations give the calcium-time history and the force time history of the muscle. By varying the electrical stimulation rates, the muscles can produce forces of varying magnitude and duration over which the force can be maintained.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1256
S. G. Arul, T. Pan, P.-C. Lin, J. Pan, Z. Feng, M. L. Santella
Microstructures and failure mechanisms of spot friction welds (SFW) in aluminum 5754 lap-shear specimens were investigated. In order to study the effect of tool geometry on the joint strength of spot friction welds, a concave tool and a flat tool were used. In order to understand the effect of tool penetration depth on the joint strength, spot friction welds were prepared with two different penetration depths for each tool. The results indicated that the concave tool produced slightly higher joint strength than the flat tool. The joint strength did not change for the two depths for the flat tool whereas the joint strength slightly increases as the penetration depth increases for the concave tool. The experimental results show that the failure mechanism is necking and shearing for the spot friction welds made by both tools. The failure was initiated and fractured through the upper sheet under the shoulder indentation near the crack tip.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0773
Chang Qi, Zheng-Dong Ma, Noboru Kikuchi, Basavaraju Raju
A Magic Cube (MQ) approach for crashworthiness design has been proposed in previous research [1]. The purpose of this paper is to extend the MQ approach to the blast protection design of a military vehicle system. By applying the Space Decompositions and Target Cascading processes of the MQ approach, three subsystem design problems are identified to systematize the blast protection design problem of a military vehicle. These three subsystems, including seat structure, restraint system, and under-body armor structure, are most influential to the overall blast-protective design target. The effects of a driver seat subsystem design and restraint-system subsystem design on system blast protection are investigated, along with a focused study on the under-body blast-protective structure design problem.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0218
Jim He, Geng Zhang, Nickolas Vlahopoulos
In this paper the development of statistical metamodels and statistical fast running models is presented first. They are utilized for propagating uncertainties in a multi-discipline design optimization process. Two main types of uncertainty can be considered in this manner: uncertainty due to variability in design variables or in random parameters; uncertainty due to the utilization of metamodels instead of the actual simulation models during the optimization process. The value of the new developments and their engagement in multi-discipline design optimization is demonstrated through a case study. An underwater vehicle is designed under four different disciplines, namely, noise radiation, self-noise due to TBL excitation, dynamic response due to propulsion impact loads, and response to an underwater detonation.
2009-04-20
Journal Article
2009-01-0028
K. Sripichai, K. Asim, W. H. Jo, J. Pan, M. Li
Fatigue behavior of laser welds in lap-shear specimens of high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels is investigated based on a fatigue crack growth model. Fatigue experiments of laser welded lap-shear specimens were conducted. Analytical global stress intensity factor solutions are developed and compared with finite element computational results. A fatigue crack growth model based on the analytical local stress intensity factor solutions of kinked cracks and the Paris law for crack growth is then adopted to estimate the fatigue lives of the laser welds under cyclic loading conditions. The estimated fatigue lives are compared with the experimental results. The results indicate that the fatigue life predictions based on the fatigue crack growth model are slightly longer than the experimental results.
2009-04-20
Journal Article
2009-01-0036
V.-X. Tran, J. Pan
Fatigue behavior of dissimilar Al/Fe spot friction welds between aluminum 6000 series alloy and coated steel sheets in lap-shear and cross-tension specimens is investigated based on experiments and three-dimensional finite element analyses. Micrographs of the welds after failure under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions show that the Al/Fe welds in lap-shear and cross-tension specimens failed along the interfacial surface. Three-dimensional finite element analyses based on the micrographs of the welds before testing were conducted to obtain the J-integral solutions at the critical locations of the welds under lap-shear and cross-tension loading conditions. The numerical results suggest that the J-integral solutions at the critical locations of the welds can be used as a fracture mechanics parameter to correlate the experimental fatigue data of the Al/Fe spot friction welds in lap-shear and cross-tension specimens.
2008-10-20
Technical Paper
2008-21-0017
Mohamed Alamgir, Ann Marie Sastry
This paper reviews and analyzes the current and future battery technologies suitable for transportation applications. The success of battery-enabled hybridization of gasoline and diesel power-trains in the past decade has clearly established it as the most credible alternative to the conventional propulsion systems. The current enthusiasm for electric vehicles further accentuates this success. In this paper, we compare the performance of a number of established and emerging battery technologies against the now well-established performance targets for electric-drive vehicles. Lithium-ion cells' superior performance and life are described, as are requirements for supplantation of NiMH cells in vehicles. Trends are discussed in technology development, which has largely been achieved through insertion of Li technologies in consumer electronics. Recent developments have given rise to several variants of the Li ion chemistry.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1706
S. G. Arul, T. Pan, W. J. Schwartz, A. J. Shih, P. K. Mallick, S. F. Miller
The effects of lubricant on lap shear strength of Spot Friction Welded (SFW) joints made of 6111-T4 alloys were studied. Taguchi L8 design of experiment methodology was used to determine the lubricant effects. The results showed that the lap shear strength increased by 9.9% when the lubricant was present at the top surface compared to that of the baseline (no lubricant) whereas the lap shear strength reduced by 10.2% and 10.9% when the lubricant was present in the middle and at the bottom surfaces compared to that of the baseline (no lubricant), respectively. The microstructure analysis showed a zigzag interface at the joint between the upper and the lower sheet metal for the baseline specimen, the specimens with the lubricant at the top and at the bottom. However, a straight line interface is exhibited at the joint between the upper and the lower sheet for the specimen with the lubricant in the middle. The weld nugget sizes of the lap shear tested specimens were measured.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1025
Akane Suzuki, Nicholas D. Saddock, Jessica R. TerBush, J. Wayne Jones, Tresa M. Pollock, Bob R. Powell
Solidification paths and phase stability have been investigated in the creep resistant Mg-Al-Ca based alloys for powertrain applications. The liquidus projection and isothermal sections of the Mg-Al-Ca ternary system were determined, including a ternary (Mg, Al)2Ca intermetallic compound. The solidification of the alloys in the α-Mg primary phase field involves L→α+(Mg, Al)2Ca eutectic reaction in a wide range of compositions and is terminated with invariant reactions that form Mg2Ca or Mg17Al12 phases. The (Mg, Al)2Ca is a high temperature phase and decomposes into Mg2Ca and Al2Ca phases between 773 and 673 K, but the transformation is kinetically quite slow at temperatures below 473 K. Based on this new knowledge, alloy modifications through quaternary elemental additions to improve the solid-solution strength and aging treatments to reinforce the α-Mg phase with precipitates have been demonstrated.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1027
Nicholas D. Saddock, Akane Suzuki, Jessica R. TerBush, J. Wayne Jones, Tresa M. Pollock, Jake Zindel, John E. Allison
Creep-resistant magnesium alloys for automotive powertrain applications offer significant potential for vehicle weight reduction. In this study permanent mold casting, microstructure and creep behavior have been investigated for a series of ternary magnesium alloys (Mg-4Al-4X (X: Ca, Ce, La, Sr) wt%) and AXJ530 (Mg-5Al-3Ca-0.15Sr, wt%). A permanent mold was instrumented with twelve thermocouples and mold temperature was monitored during the casting process. Average mold temperature increased from 200°C to 400°C during a typical alloy casting series (fifteen to twenty castings). The cast microstructure for all alloys consists of primary α-Mg globular phase surrounded by eutectic structure which is composed of intermetallic(s) and α-Mg magnesium phases. The primary cell size of the AXJ530 increased from 18 to 24 μm with increasing mold temperature and a similar trend is expected for all alloys.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1220
Kevin R. Cox, Richard E. Robertson
When weakening a skin/foam bilaminate by mechanically scoring the polymer skin on its back surface, where it is bonded to the foam, the weakness of the bilaminate is determined by the depth of the score groove. The deeper the groove, the weaker the bilaminate. But also, the deeper the groove, the greater the tendency for read-through. Read-through is seeing on the front surface the location of this groove that was created on the back surface. Scored skins, after mounting flat on a glass plate, were viewed with an optical interferometer. It was found that the topographical feature that constituted read-through was a valley. A Silly Putty model was used to better understand the strains induced by mechanical scoring and this understanding was used to identify factors affecting read-through. Blade thickness and the ultimate elongation of the skin material were identified as factors. This work is applicable to certain types of passenger-side seamless airbag systems, for example.
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