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Viewing 1 to 30 of 108
1989-11-01
Technical Paper
892461
Paul S. Fancher, Kenneth L. Campbell, Daniel F. Blower
The implications of restricting axle loads to preserve pavements while at the same time allowing gross combination weights over 80,000 pounds are examined with respect to the design qualities of the types of heavy trucks that might be developed. The proposed vehicles would have more axles than current designs thereby achieving higher gross combination weights with smaller axle loads. Design factors influencing mobility, productivity, preservation of the highway infrastructure, and performance in safety-related maneuvers are discussed.
1989-11-01
Technical Paper
892499
Paul S. Fancher
Directional performance characteristics of heavy truck combinations are reviewed with respect to the influences of multiple axles and articulation points. The performance characteristics considered include steady turning, directional stability, and forced responses in obstacle avoidance maneuvers. The review provides useful insights to engineers interested in the handling and safety qualities of these types of vehicles.
1985-06-01
Technical Paper
851244
Guy S. Nusholtz, Patricia S. Kaiker, Gail J. Muscott, Bryan R. Suggitt
This paper discusses techniques developed and used by the Biosciences Group at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) for measuring three-dimensional head motion, skull bone strain, epidural pressure, and internal brain motion of repressurized cadavers and Rhesus monkeys during head impact. In the experimental design, a stationary test subject is struck by a guided moving impactor of 10 kg (monkeys) and 25 or 65 kg (cadavers). The impactor striking surface is fitted with padding to vary the contact force-time characteristics. The experimental technique uses a nine-accelerometer system rigidly affixed to the skull to measure head motion, transducers placed at specific points below the skull to record epidural pressure, repressurization of both the vascular and cerebrospinal systems, and high-speed cineradiography (at 1000 frames per second) of radiopaque targets.
1983-10-17
Technical Paper
831609
D. H. Robbins, J. W. Melvin, D. F. Huelke, H. W. Sherman
The purpose of this paper is to describe a combination of state-of-the-art detailed accident investigation procedures, computerized vehicle crash and occupant modeling, and biomechanical analysis of human injury causation into a method for obtaining enhanced biomechanical data from car crashes. Four accident cases, out of eighteen investigated, were selected for detailed reconstruction. Three were frontal impacts while the fourth was lateral. The CRASH II and MVMA 2-D analytical models were used in the reconstruction process. Occupant motions, force interactions with vehicle components, accelerations on the various body segments, and much other information was produced in the simulation process and is reported in this paper along with scene and injury data from the accidents.
1983-10-17
Technical Paper
831606
Guy S. Nusholtz, John W. Melvin, Paula Lux
A test series using unembalmed cadavers was conducted to investigate thoracic response differences in lateral impacts between high energy (rib fractures produced) and low energy (no rib fractures produced) testing and also the response to low energy impacts for different impact directions (frontal, 45°, and lateral). Five of the test subjects were instrumented with a nine-accelerometer package and an eighteen-accelerometer array to measure thoracic response. Seven of the test subjects were instrumented with a triaxial accelerometer on the head and a six-accelerometer array to measure thoracic response. Impact events were performed with either the UMTRI pendulum impact device or the UMTRI pneumatic impact device. The subject was struck with a free-traveling mass (25 or 56 kg) which was fitted with either a 15 cm round or 20 cm square rigid metal surface.
1983-10-17
Technical Paper
831616
G. S. Nusholtz, D. E. Huelke, P. Lux, N. M. Alem, F. Montalvo
A test series using eight unembalmed cadavers was conducted to investigate factors affecting the creation of cervical spine damage from impact to the crown of the head. The crown impact was accomplished by a free-fall drop of the test subject onto a load plate. The load plate striking surface was covered with padding to vary the contact force time characteristics. The orientations of the head, cervical spine, and torso were adjusted relative to a laboratory coordinate system to investigate the effects of head and spinal configuration on the damage patterns. Load and acceleration data are presented as a function of time and as a function of frequency in the form of mechanical impedance.
1983-10-17
Technical Paper
831617
D. H. Robbins, L. W. Schneider, R. G. Snyder, M. Pflug, Mark Haffner
This paper describes the methodology and results from a project involving development of anthropometrically based design specifications for a family of advanced adult anthropomorphic dummies. Selection of family members and anthropometric criteria for subject sample selection were based on expected applications of the devices and on an analysis of U.S. population survey data. This resulted in collection of data for dummy sizes including a small female, a mid-sized male, and a large male. The three phases of data collection included: 1. in-vehicle measurements to determine seat track position and seating posture preferred by the subjects for use in development of laboratory seat bucks; 2. measurement of subject/seat interface contours for fabrication of an average hard seat surface for use in the buck; and 3. measurement of standard anthropometry, seated anthropometry (in the buck), and three-dimensional surface landmark coordinates using standard and photogrammetric techniques.
1984-02-01
Technical Paper
840528
Joe Benson, Larry Schneider
As a result of improved educational opportunities, handicapped children have increased exposure to transportation related risks. Many of these children require specialized orthopedic seating and posture control devices and must remain in them while riding in a vehicle. The lack of impact protection features in these seating devices introduces an unnecessary level of risk. The emphasis of this program was to demonstrate that proven restraint principles could be applied to handicapped seating without compromising the medical requirements of these units. Efforts were concentrated on two such systems: a molded-shell orthotic seat and a stroller-type Travel Chair. Sled impact tests at 30 mph and 20 g's were used to assist in the evaluation of the upgraded restraints. The results have been encouraging and have shown that handicapped seating can supply the same level of crash protection provided by conventional child restraint systems.
1991-02-01
Technical Paper
910811
Donald F. Huelke, Timothy W. Compton, Charles P. Compton
Frontal crashes (11-1 o'clock) were reviewed from the National Accident Severity Study file (NASS) for years 1980-87. Adult drivers and front right passengers, with lower extremity injuries of the pelvis, thigh, knee, leg or ankle/foot were reviewed. Analysis of age differences, injury contacts, and effectiveness of the 3-point restraint system were studied. Unrestrained drivers have a higher frequency of knee injuries than passengers, fewer leg injuries than passengers and both have the same frequency of ankle/foot injuries. Older unbelted drivers have more injuries to the pelvis, leg, and ankle/foot region than do young drivers. Passengers have more leg injuries. The instrument panel is the major contact for most of the lower extremity injuries. Lap/shoulder belts significantly reduce lower extremity injury frequency.
1991-02-01
Technical Paper
910822
Michael Flannagan, Michael Sivak, Andrew W. Gellatly
Electrochromic rearview mirrors can provide continuous levels of reflectivity and unobtrusive, automatic control. The availability of this technology has increased the importance of understanding how to select the best level of reflectivity for a given set of lighting conditions. For night driving with glare from following headlights, the best reflectivity level will always depend on a tradeoff among several variables. This study was designed to help clarify what variables are important and how they should be quantified. Twenty subjects, 10 younger and 10 older, performed a number of visual tasks while viewing stimuli through an electrochromic rearview mirror. Subjects were seated in an automobile mockup in a laboratory, and the reflectivity level of the mirror was changed before each of a series of discrete trials. On each trial, subjects saw reflected in the mirror a visual-acuity stimulus and a glare source of varying intensity.
1989-08-01
Technical Paper
891632
Paul S. Fancher, Arvind Mathew
A method is presented for checking vehicle designs to see if they will meet size and weight rules that may be applicable to vehicles weighing more than 80,000 lb. Then, examples of heavy trucks that have been designed to be productive are used in illustrating analytical evaluations of measures of performance in safety-related maneuvering situations. The paper concludes with the point of view that trucks over 80,000 lb could have design attributes that would allow these heavier vehicles to have levels of intrinsic safety exceeding or comparable to those of current trucks.
2013-11-11
Technical Paper
2013-22-0002
Matthew P. Reed, Sheila M. Ebert, Jason J. Hallman
A laboratory study of posture and belt fit was conducted with 46 men and 51 women, 61% of whom were age 60 years or older and 32% age 70 years or older. In addition, 28% of the 97 participants were obese, defined as body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2. A mockup of a passenger vehicle driver's station was created and five belt anchorage configurations were produced by moving the buckle, outboard-upper (D-ring), and outboard-lower anchorages. An investigator recorded the three-dimensional locations of landmarks on the belt and the participant's body using a coordinate measurement machine. The location of the belt with respect to the underlying skeletal structures was analyzed, along with the length of belt webbing. Using linear regression models, an increase in age from 20 to 80 years resulted in the lap belt positioned 18 mm further forward relative to the pelvis, 26 mm greater lap belt webbing length, and 19 mm greater shoulder belt length.
2005-11-09
Technical Paper
2005-22-0018
Matthew P. Reed, Sheila M. Ebert-Hamilton, Lawrence W. Schneider
The initial positioning of anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) can influence the outcomes of crash tests. Current procedures for positioning ATDs in rear seats are not based on systematic studies of passenger postures. This paper compares the postures of three side-impact ATDs to the postures of 24 men and women in three vehicle rear seats and 16 laboratory conditions. When positioned using current procedures, the locations of the ES-2 and SID-HIII ATD heads are generally rearward of those observed with similar-size passengers. The SID-IIs head locations matched the expected locations of heads of passengers of similar size more closely. As the seat back angle was increased, people reclined less than the ATDs. Based on these findings, a new ATD positioning procedure for rear seats was developed. The primary objective of the new procedure is to place the ATD head in the location that is most likely for people of similar size.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0250
Nichole L. Ritchie, Stewart C. Wang, Mark R. Sochor, Lawrence W. Schneider
A method has been developed to identify and document the locations of rib fractures from two-dimensional CT images obtained from occupants of crashes investigated in the Crash Injury Research Engineering Network (CIREN). The location of each rib fracture includes the vertical location by rib number (1 through 12), the lateral location by side of the thorax (inboard and outboard), and the circumferential location by five 36-degree segments relative to the sternum and spine. The latter include anterior, anterior-lateral, lateral, posterior-lateral, and posterior regions. 3D reconstructed images of the whole ribcage created from the 2D CT images using Voxar software are used to help identify fractures and their rib number. A geometric method for consistently locating each fracture circumferentially is described.
2009-06-09
Technical Paper
2009-01-2261
F. Scott Gayzik, Craig A. Hamilton, Josh C. Tan, Craig McNally, Stefan M. Duma, Kathleen D. Klinich, Joel D. Stitzel
This study outlines a protocol for image data collection acquired from human volunteers. The data set will serve as the foundation of a consolidated effort to develop the next generation full-body Finite Element Analysis (FEA) models for injury prediction and prevention. The geometry of these models will be based off the anatomy of four individuals meeting extensive prescreening requirements and representing the 5th and 50th percentile female, and the 50th and 95th percentile male. Target values for anthropometry are determined by literature sources. Because of the relative strengths of various modalities commonly in use today in the clinical and engineering worlds, a multi-modality approach is outlined. This approach involves the use of Computed Tomography (CT), upright and closed-bore Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and external anthropometric measurements.
2014-11-10
Technical Paper
2014-22-0015
Lauren K. Wood, Carl S. Miller, Nathaniel H. Madura, Matthew P. Reed, Lawrence W. Schneider, Kathleen D. Klinich, Jonathan D. Rupp
Eight whole fresh-frozen cadavers (6 female, 2 male) that were elderly and/or female were laterally impacted using UMTRI's dual-sled side-impact test facility. Cadavers were not excluded on the basis of old age or bone diseases that affect tolerance. A thinly padded, multi-segment impactor was used that independently measured force histories applied to the shoulder, thorax, abdomen, greater trochanter, iliac wing, and femur of each PMHS. Impactor plates were adjusted vertically and laterally toward the subject so that contact with body regions occurred simultaneously and so that each segment contacted the same region on every subject. This configuration minimized the effects of body shape on load sharing between regions. Prior to all tests, cadavers were CT scanned to check for pre-existing skeletal injuries. Cadavers were excluded if they had pre-existing rib fractures or had undergone CPR.
2013-11-11
Technical Paper
2013-22-0015
Carl S. Miller, Nathaniel H. Madura, Lawrence W. Schneider, Kathleen D. Klinich, Matthew P. Reed, Jonathan D. Rupp
Lateral impact tests were performed using seven male post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) to characterize the force-deflection response of contacted body regions, including the lower abdomen. All tests were performed using a dual-sled, side-impact test facility. A segmented impactor was mounted on a sled that was pneumatically accelerated into a second, initially stationary sled on which a subject was seated facing perpendicular to the direction of impact. Positions of impactor segments were adjusted for each subject so that forces applied to different anatomic regions, including thorax, abdomen, greater trochanter, iliac wing, and thigh, could be independently measured on each PMHS. The impactor contact surfaces were located in the same vertical plane, except that the abdomen plate was offset 5.1 cm towards the subject.
2013-11-11
Technical Paper
2013-22-0004
Stephen W. Rouhana, Srinivasan Sundararajan, Derek Board, Priya Prasad (Retired), Jonathan D. Rupp, Carl S. Miller, Thomas A. Jeffreys, Lawrence W. Schneider
NHTSA estimates that more than half of the lives saved (168,524) in car crashes between 1960 and 2002 were due to the use of seat belts. Nevertheless, while seat belts are vital to occupant crash protection, safety researchers continue efforts to further enhance the capability of seat belts in reducing injury and fatality risk in automotive crashes. Examples of seat belt design concepts that have been investigated by researchers include inflatable, 4-point, and reverse geometry seat belts. In 2011, Ford Motor Company introduced the first rear seat inflatable seat belts into production vehicles. A series of tests with child and small female-sized Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATD) and small, elderly female Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS) was performed to evaluate interactions of prototype inflatable seat belts with the chest, upper torso, head and neck of children and small occupants, from infants to young adolescents.
2010-11-03
Technical Paper
2010-22-0005
Kathleen D. Klinich, Carol A. C. Flannagan, Kristen Nicholson, Lawrence W. Schneider, Jonathan D. Rupp
The NASS-CDS (1998-2008) and CIREN datasets were analyzed to identify factors contributing to abdominal injury in crash environments where belt use and airbag deployment are common. In frontal impacts, the percentage of occupants sustaining abdominal injury is three times higher for unbelted compared to belted front-row adult occupants (p≺0.0001) at both AIS2+ and AIS3+ injury levels. Airbag deployment does not substantially affect the percentage of occupants who sustain abdominal injuries in frontal impacts (p=0.6171), while belt use reduces the percentage of occupants sustaining abdominal injury in both nearside and farside crashes (p≺0.0001). Right-front passengers in right-side impacts have the highest risk (1.91%) of AIS 3+ abdominal injury (p=0.03). The percentage of occupants with AIS 3+ abdominal injuries does not vary with age for frontal, nearside, or farside impacts.
1991-10-01
Technical Paper
912864
Gregory L. Mayhew, Jason Erlichman, Keith L. Shirley, Fritz Streff
Abstract Intelligent Vehicle Highway System (IVHS) represents the application of information technology to improve the effectiveness of the existing road transportation system resulting in increased safety and better traffic management [1,2]. In-Vehicle Safety Advisory and Warning System (IVSAWS) Program is a Federal Highway Admisistration project to develop a system that provides drivers with advance notification of roadway hazards. IVSAWS units will provide supplemental warnings in order to ameliorate hazardous scenarios (e.g., railroad grade crossings, slow moving vehicles) which are particularly hazardous and have remained hazardous despite traditional crash reduction techniques such as additional mechanical signing. Program aspects include hazard scenario identification, system architecture design, driver alert warning subsystem design, communication subsystem design, and proof of concept field testing.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920560
Donald F. Huelke, G. Murray Mackay, Andrew Morris, Maureen Bradford
Abstract Crash injury reduction via lap-shoulder belt use has been well documented. As any interior car component, lap-shoulder belts may be related to injury in certain crashes. Relatively unknown is the fact that cervical fractures or fracture-dislocations to restrained front seat occupants where, in the crash, no head contact was evidenced by both medical records and car inspection. An extensive review of the available world's literature on car crash injuries revealed more than 100 such cases. A review of the NASS 80-88 was also conducted, revealing more examples. Cases from the author's own files are also detailed.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920562
Donald F. Huelke, G. Murray Mackay, Andrew Morris, Maureen Bradford
Abstract The effects of child safety seats have been well documented in the medical literature. Scattered throughout the medical literature are individual case reports of cervical injury to children restrained in child restraint systems. A review of the literature is provided identifying previous documented cases. The authors also provide new case details of children with cervical spine injury without head contact. An overview of the growth of the infant and specific details in the cervical spine that may contribute to significant cervical injury without head impact is presented.
1993-03-01
Technical Paper
930644
Matthew P. Reed, Lawrence W. Schneider
In recent investigations of airbag deployments, drivers h v c reported abrasions to the face, neck, and forearms due to deploying airbags, A study of the airbag design and deployments parameters affecting the incidence and severity of abrasions caused by driver-side airbags has led to the development of a laboratory test procedure to evaluate the potential of an airbag design m cause skin injury This report describes the procedure, which is based an static deployments of airbags into a cylindrical lest fixture. The target area is covered with a material that responds to abrasion-producing events in a manner related to human skin tolerance. Test results show excellent correlation with abrasion injuries produced by airbag deployments into the skin of human volunteers.
1993-03-01
Technical Paper
930832
C. B. Winkler, S. E. Bogard, K. E. Campbell
Tilt-table testing is one means of quantifying the static roll stability of highway vehicles. By this technique, a test vehicle is subjected to a physical situation analogous to that experienced in a steady state turn. Although the analogy is not perfect, the simplicity and fidelity of the method make it an attractive means for estimating static rollover threshold. The NHTSA has suggested the tilt-table method as one means of regulating the roll stability properties of light trucks and utility vehicles. One consideration in evaluating the suitability of any test method for regulatory use is repeatability, both within and among testing facilities. As a first step toward evaluating the repeatability of the tilt-table method, an experimental study examining the sensitivity of tilt-table test results to variables associated with methodology and facility was conducted by UMTRI for the Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association. This paper reports some of the findings of that study.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980012
Miriam A. Manary, Carol A. C. Flannagan, Matthew P. Reed, Lawrence W. Schneider
SAE Recommended Practice J941 describes the eyellipse, a statistical representation of driver eye locations, that is used to facilitate design decisions regarding vehicle interiors, including the display locations, mirror placement, and headspace requirements. Eye-position data collected recently at University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) suggest that the SAE J941 practice could be improved. SAE J941 currently uses the SgRP location, seat-track travel (L23), and design seatback angle (L40) as inputs to the eyellipse model. However, UMTRI data show that the characteristics of empirical eyellipses can be predicted more accurately using seat height, steering-wheel position, and seat-track rise. A series of UMTRI studies collected eye-location data from groups of 50 to 120 drivers with statures spanning over 97 percent of the U.S. population. Data were collected in thirty-three vehicles that represent a wide range of vehicle geometry.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980856
Warren N. Hardy, Lawrence W. Schneider, Matthew P. Reed
Four unembalmed human cadavers were used in eight direct-forearm-airbag-interaction static deployments to assess the relative aggressivity of two different airbag modules. Instrumentation of the forearm bones included triaxial accelerometry, crack detection gages, and film targets. The forearm-fracture predictors, peak and average distal forearm speed (PDFS and ADFS), were evaluated and compared to the incidence of transverse, oblique, and wedge fractures of the radius and ulna. Internal-airbag pressure and axial column loads were also measured. The results of this study support the use of PDFS or ADFS for the prediction of airbag-induced upper-extremity fractures. The results also suggest that there is no direct relationship between internal-airbag pressure and forearm fracture. The less-aggressive system (LAS) examined in this study produced half the number of forearm fracture as the more-aggressive system (MAS), yet exhibited a more aggressive internal-pressure performance.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970910
Michael J. Flannagan, Michael Sivak, Eric C. Traube
Abstract The U.S. currently requires that reai-view mirrors installed as original equipment in the center and driver-side positions be flat. There has recently been interest in using nonplanar mirrors in those positions, including possibly mirrors with large radii (over 2 m). This has provided additional motivation to understand the effects of mirror curvature on drivers' perceptions of distance and speed. This paper addresses this issue by (1) reviewing the concepts from perceptual theory that are most relevant to predicting and understanding how drivers judge distance in nonplanar rearview mirrors, and (2) reviewing the past empirical studies that have manipulated mirror curvature and measured some aspect of distance perception. The effects of mirror curvature on cues for distance perception do not lead to simple predictions. The most obvious model is one based on visual angle, according to which convex mirrors should generally lead to overestimation of distances.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970458
P. Fancher, Z. Bareket, S. Bogard, C. MacAdam, R. Ervin
The tests described here have been used to provide a preliminary checkout of the control functionality of a prototype adaptive cruise control (ACC) system being used in a field operational test of intelligent cruise control. The results presented provide an initial characterization of the headway control performance of the ACC system. The inputs to these tests are the speed of the preceding vehicle. The results of the tests are based upon measurements of range, range rate, velocity, transmission shift commands, and velocity commands resident within the ACC system. Numerical performance measures are derived from these data and used to characterize system performance quantitatively. Results from these types of tests could be used in assessing differences in headway control characteristics associated with various ACC systems.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970493
Donald F. Huelke, Ryan Gilbert, Lawrence W. Schneider
In a review of 540 crashes in which the steering-wheel airbag deployed, 38% of the drivers sustained some level of upper extremity injury. The majority of these were AIS-1 injuries including abrasions, contusions and small lacerations. In 18 crashes the drivers sustained AIS-2 or-3 level upper extremity injuries, including fractures of the radius and/or ulna, or of the metacarpal bones, all related to airbag deployments. It was determined that six drivers sustained the fracture(s) directly from the deploying airbag or the airbag module cover. The remaining 12 drivers had fractures from the extremity being flung into interior vehicle structures, usually the instrument panel. Most drivers were taller than 170 cm and, of the 18 drivers, 10 were males.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970490
Donald F. Huelke, Lawrence W. Schneider, Matthew P. Reed, Ryan J. Gilbert
To determine the frequency of facial injuries from steering-wheel airbag deployments, 540 consecutive steering-wheel airbag deployments, investigated by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) personnel, were reviewed. About 1 in 3 drivers sustain an injury to the face. Injuries to the area surrounding the eye (periorbital) or to the eyeball (ocular) rarely occur. The frequencies of facial or ocular injuries are the same for belted and unbelted drivers. Drivers of short stature had a higher frequency of facial injury. Females sustained ocular injuries more frequently than males. Untethered airbags were not overly involved in drivers with an ocular injury. No specific make or model car were overly represented in the ocular injury cases.
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