Criteria

Text:
Sector:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 85
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2327
Roger Shulze, P.K. Mallick
The automotive industry is expected to accelerate the transition to revolutionary products, rapid changes in technology and increasing technological sophistication. This will require engineers to advance their knowledge, connect and integrate different areas of knowledge and be skilled in synthesis. In addition, they must learn to work in cross-disciplinary teams and adopt a systems approach. The College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) at the University of Michigan-Dearborn (UM-Dearborn) responded by creating interdisciplinary MS and Ph.D. programs in automotive systems engineering (ASE) and augmenting them with hands-on research. Students at the undergraduate level can also engage in numerous ASE activities. UM-Dearborn's ASE programs offer interesting and possibly unique advantages. The first is that it offers a spectrum of ASE degree and credit programs, from the MS to the Ph.D. to continuing education.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0192
Hong Tae Kang, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Mark Amaya, John Bonnen, Hua-Chu Shih, Shahuraj Mane, Todd Link
In the North American automotive industry, various advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are used to lighten vehicle structures, improve safety performance and fuel economy, and reduce harmful emissions. Relatively thick gages of AHSS are commonly joined to conventional high strength steels and/or mild steels using Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) in the current generation body-in-white structures. Additionally, fatigue failures are most likely to occur at joints subjected to a variety of different loadings. It is therefore critical that automotive engineers need to understand the fatigue characteristics of welded joints. The Sheet Steel Fatigue Committee of the Auto/Steel Partnership (A/S-P) completed a comprehensive fatigue study on GMAW joints of both AHSS and conventional sheet steels including: DP590 GA, SAE 1008, HSLA HR 420, DP 600 HR, Boron, DQSK, TRIP 780 GI, and DP780 GI steels.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0381
Vivek Bhise, Ghassan Kridli, Huzefa Mamoola, Shawn Devaraj, Anitha Pillai, Roger Shulze
This paper describes a research project currently in-progress to develop a parametric model of a vehicle for use in early design stages of a new vehicle program. The model requires key input parameters to define the kind of new vehicle to be designed — in terms of details such as its intended driver/user population, vehicle type (e.g. 2-box, 3-box designs), and some key exterior and interior dimensions related to its size and proportions. The model computes and graphically displays interior package, ergonomics zones for driver controls and displays, and field of views through window openings. It also allows importing or inputting and superimposing and manipulating exterior surfaces created by a designer to assess compatibility between the interior occupant package and the vehicle exterior.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1709
Vivek Bhise, Roger Shulze, Huzefa Mamoola, Jeffrey Bonner
This paper describes a unique interior design and multidisciplinary process implemented by the faculty and students to develop the interior for a Low Mass Vehicle (LMV). The 103 inch LMV was designed with the goal of about 30% reduction in weight than a typical class C segment vehicle and would require low investment in manufacturing. In the early stages of the program, the UM-Dearborn team developed detailed requirements of the vehicle interior based on the vehicle's exterior developed using a similar process. The requirements were given to a senior class of automotive design students from the College of Creative Studies in Detroit to create different interior design themes. Approximately twenty-five interior design themes were judged by a panel of automotive industry experts, and a winning design was selected.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2305
Steven E. Underwood, Bruce Maxim, John J. Cristiano
This paper describes the design and application of a business simulation to help train employees about the new business model and culture that for an automotive supplier company that designs connected vehicle and other advanced electronic products for the automotive industry. The simulation, called SIM-i-TRI, is a three to four day collaborative learning activity that simulates the executive, administrative, engineering, manufacturing, and marketing functions in three divisions of a manufacturer that supplies parts and systems to customers in industries similar to the automotive industry. It was originally designed to support the new employee orientation at the Tier 1 supplier and to provide the participants a safe environment to practice the lessons from the orientation. The simulation has been used several times a month in the US, England, and Germany for over four years.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0631
C.L. Chow, Y. Wei, Shen Wu, Bala Subbaraman, James Borchelt, Gregory Frederick
The paper presents a method of analysis based on the theory of damage mechanics to quantify the degree of damage in an engineering structure under load. The method is incorporated into a Ford in-house finite element program called FCRASH that is applied to analyze the cumulative damage in a bumper under multiple low speed impacts. The numerical results calculated at the peak value of the contact force are compared with the test results. The FEA results are used to identify the locations of the hotspot in the bumper system and the predicted location where a potential crack would initiate. The microscopic observations showed damage in the area predicted with the finite element program after the specified number of impacts.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0772
Ghassan T. Kridli, Peter A. Friedman, Andrew M. Sherman
The use of tailor welded blanks (TWBs) in automotive applications is increasing due to the potential of weight and cost savings. These blanks are manufactured by joining two or more sheets of dissimilar gauge, properties, or both, to form a lighter blank of desired strength and stiffness. This allows an engineer to “tailor” the properties of the blank to meet the design requirements of a particular panel. TWBs are used in such places as door inner panels, lift gates, and floor pans. Earlier investigations of the use of TWBs targeted steel alloys, but the potential of further weight savings with aluminum TWBs is gaining interest in the automotive industry. Unlike steel TWBs, the welds in aluminum TWBs are not significantly stronger than the base material and are occasionally the fracture site. Additionally, the reduced formability of aluminum, as compared with drawing-quality steels, makes the application of aluminum TWBs more difficult than steel TWBs.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0776
C.L. Chow, W.H. Tai, Sing Tang
In this paper, a predictive method is developed to determine the forming limit strain and fracture limit strain in a stamped automotive component subjected to a complex strain history that would be experienced during an actual forming operation. The method of analysis is based on a damage mechanics model developed recently by the authors and extended to take into account the hysteretic effects of the principal strain and damage planes. The forming limit and fracture limit strains are then predicted using the modified damage model. Satisfactory predictions have been achieved for a practical case where the complex strain history is prescribed based an actual stamping operation.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1027
Mangesh Natu, Vivek Bhise, Roger Shulze
This paper presents results of a research project conducted to develop a methodology and to refine the specifications of a small, low mass, low cost vehicle being developed at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. The challenge was to assure that the design would meet the needs and expectations of customers in three different countries, namely, China, India and the United States. U.S, Chinese and Indian students studying on the university campus represented customers from their respective countries for our surveys and provided us with the necessary data on: 1) Importance of various vehicle level attributes to the entry level small car customer, 2) Preferences to various features, and 3) Direction magnitude estimation on parameters to size the vehicle for each of the three markets.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-0771
Shardul Bhambure, Pankaj K. Mallick
This study considers the thermal stresses in single lap adhesive joints between magnesium and steel. The source of thermal stresses is the large difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion of magnesium and steel. Two different temperature differentials from the ambient conditions (23°C) were considered, namely -30°C and +50°C. Thermal stresses were determined using finite element analysis. In addition to Mg-steel substrate combination, Mg-Mg and steel-steel combinations were also studied. Combined effect of temperature variation and applied load was also explored. It was observed that temperature increase or decrease can cause significant thermal stresses in the adhesive layer and thermal stress distribution in the adhesive layer depends on the substrate combination and the applied load.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0071
Anjan Vincent, Vivek D. Bhise, Pankaj Mallick
Seat comfort is a highly subjective attribute and depends on a wide range of factors, but the successful prediction of seat comfort from a group of relevant variables can hold the promise of eliminating the need for time-consuming subjective evaluations during the early stages of seat cushion selection and development. This research presents the subjective seat comfort data of a group of 30 participants using a controlled range of seat foam samples, and attempts to correlate this attribute with a) the anthropometric and demographic characteristics of the participants, b) the objective pressure distribution at the body-seat interface and c) properties of the various foam samples that were used for the test.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0202
Yi L. Murphey, Dev Kochhar, Fang Chen, Yinghao Huang, Yong Wang
We present research in progress to develop and implement a transportable instrumentation package (TIP) to collect driver data in a vehicle. The overall objective of the project is to investigate the symbiotic relationship between humans and their vehicles. We first describe the state-of-art technologies to build the components of TIP that meet the criteria of ease of installation, minimal interference with driving, and sufficient signals to monitor driver state and condition. This method is a viable alternative to current practice which is to first develop a fully instrumented test vehicle, often at great expense, and use it to collect data from each participant as he/she drives a prescribed route. Another practice, as for example currently being used in the SHRP-2 naturalistic driving study, is to install the appropriate instrumentation for data collection in each individual's vehicle, often requiring several hours.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0312
ZiQiang Sheng, Pankaj Mallick
Abstract Based on findings from micromechanical studies, a Ductile Failure Criterion (DFC) was proposed. The proposed DFC treats localized necking as failure and critical damage as a function of strain path and initial sheet thickness. Under linear strain path assumption, a method to predict Forming Limit Curve (FLC) is derived from this DFC. With the help of predetermined effect functions, the method only needs a calibration at uniaxial tension. The approach was validated by predicting FLCs for sixteen different aluminum and steel sheet metal materials. Comparison shows that the prediction matches quite well with experimental observations in most cases.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1265
Nia R. Harrison, S. George Luckey, Breana Cappuccilli, Ghassan Kridli
Abstract The typical paint bake cycle includes multiple ramps and dwells of temperature through e-coat, paint, and clear coat with exposure equivalent to approximately 190°C for up to 60 minutes. 7xxx-series aluminum alloys are heat treatable, additional thermal exposure such as a paint bake cycle could alter the material properties. Therefore, this study investigates the response of three 7xxx-series aluminum alloys with respect to conductivity, hardness, and yield strength when exposed to three oven curing cycles of a typical automotive paint operation. The results have indicated that alloy composition and artificial aging practice influence the material response to the various paint bake cycles.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0144
Lavish Agarwal, P. K. Mallick, H. T. Kang
Spot friction welding is considered a cost-effective method for joining lightweight automotive alloys, such as magnesium and aluminum alloys. An experimental study was conducted to investigate the strength of spot friction welded joints of magnesium to magnesium, aluminum to aluminum, magnesium to aluminum and aluminum to magnesium. The joint structures and failure modes were also studied.
2009-06-15
Technical Paper
2009-01-1952
Keshav S. Varde, Nanda Kumar Manoharan
Gasoline-ethanol blends are being used or have been considered as a fuel for spark ignition engines. The motivation for using the blends varies in indifferent parts of the world and even in regions within a country. The increasing cost of gasoline, combined with regional tax incentives, is one of the reasons for increased interests in gasoline-ethanol blends in recent years in the U.S. Many vehicular engines are not designed to use a specific gasoline-ethanol blend. Rather, the engines have multi-blend capability, ranging from E0 to about E85. It is plausible that engine-out emissions will vary depending on the blend being used which may be further impacted by the level of EGR used with the blends. The present work was carried out to investigate engine out emissions when a vehicular spark-ignition engine was operated on E0 and E85 and different levels of EGR. A 4-cylinder, 2.5 liter, PFI engine was used in the experimental investigation.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-0037
Kimberly Lazarz, Robert C. McCune, Wenchao Wang, P. K. Mallick
This study reports the performance of three different automotive magnesium substrate materials (AM60B diecastings, AZ31-H24 sheet, and AM30 extrusions), each bonded to a common aluminum reference material with two different toughened adhesives. The magnesium substrates were pretreated with six different commercial pretreatments both with and without a final fused-powder polymeric topcoat. These samples were then evaluated by comparing initial lap-shear strength to the lap-shear strength after cyclic-corrosion testing. Additionally, use of a scribe through the polymer primer permitted assessment of: 1) distance of corrosion undercutting from the scribe (filiform), and 2) percent corrosion over the area of the coupon. The results showed that the performance of each magnesium pretreatment varied on cast AM60B, sheet AZ31-H24, and extruded AM30 substrates.
2009-04-20
Journal Article
2009-01-0017
Vivek D. Bhise, Pankaj K. Mallick, Vishnuvardhan H. Sarma
This paper presents results of a three-phase research project aimed at understanding how future automotive interior materials should be selected or designed to satisfy the needs of the customers. The first project phase involved development of 22 five-point semantic differential scales to measure visual, visual-tactile, and evaluative characteristics of the materials. Some examples of the adjective pairs used to create the semantic differential scales to measure the perceptual characteristics of the material are: a) Visual: Light vs. Dark, Flat vs. Shiny, etc., b) Visual-Tactile: Smooth vs. Rough, Slippery vs. Sticky, Compressive vs. Non-Compressive, Textured vs. Non-Textured, etc., c) Evaluative (overall perception): Dislike vs. Like, Fake vs. Genuine, Cheap vs. Expensive, etc. In the second phase, 12 younger and 12 older drivers were asked to evaluate a number of different automotive interior materials by using the 22 semantic differential scales.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0995
Q. Le, H. Kang, A. Khosrovaneh, C. Y. Sa, B. Yan
The component being formed experiences some type of prestrain that may have an effect on its fatigue strength. This study investigated the forming effects on material fatigue strength of dual phase sheet steel (DP600) subjected to various uniaxial prestrains. In the as-received condition, DP600 specimens were tested for tensile properties to determine the prestraining level based on the uniform elongation corresponding to the maximum strength of DP600 on the stress-strain curve. Three different levels of prestrain at 90%, 70% and 50% of the uniform elongation were applied to uniaxial prestrain specimens for tensile tests and fatigue tests. Fatigue tests were conducted with strain controlled to obtain fatigue properties and compare them with the as-received DP600. The fatigue test results were presented with strain amplitude and Neuber's factor.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0438
Allen Hale, Derek Pelowski, Vivek Bhise
This paper presents results of two surveys, namely, a photographic measurements survey and a rider survey, conducted to determine how the type and origin of a motorcycle related to motorcycle dimensions, rider characteristics, seating posture, and motorcycle controls and displays. In the photographic survey, 12 most popular motorcycles covering three types (cruiser, sport, and touring) and three origins (Europe, Asia and North America) were measured from photographs taken in a standardized procedure with and without a rider. The data showed that the Asian and North American cruisers were very similar in all dimensions. These include seat height, seat to handlebar location, seat to foot rest location, foot rest size, and handgrip stance. This resulted in similar rider posture. North American sport motorcycles were more like cruisers than the Asian and European sport motorcycles.
2004-05-04
Technical Paper
2004-01-2097
Taehyun Shim, Daniel Toomey
It is well understood that driver's steering input strongly affects lateral vehicle dynamics and excessive steering command may result in unstable vehicle motion. In a certain driving condition, it is possible for a skilled driver to prevent vehicle rollover with better perceptive capability of judging conditions and responding faster with smooth compensatory actions. This paper investigates the possibility of using active steering and wheel torque control to assist drivers in avoiding vehicle rollovers in emergency situations. The effectiveness of steering control alone and combination of steering/wheel torque control in recovery from unstable vehicle roll condition was demonstrated through simulation of both low and high vehicle speeds.
2004-05-04
Technical Paper
2004-01-2052
Russell P. Osborn, Taehyun Shim
The sophistication of all-wheel-drive technology is approaching the point where the drive torque to each wheel can be independently controlled. This potentially offers vehicle handling enhancements similar to those provided by Dynamic Stability Control, but without the inevitable reduction in vehicle acceleration. Independent control of all-wheel-drive torque distribution would therefore be especially beneficial under acceleration close to the limit of stability. A vehicle model of a typical sports sedan was developed in Simulink, with fully independent control of torque distribution. Box-Behnken experimental design was employed to determine which torque distribution parameters have the greatest impact on the vehicle course and acceleration. A proportional-integral control strategy was implemented, applying yaw rate feedback to vary the front-rear torque distribution, and lateral acceleration feedback to adjust the left-right distribution.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2428
Gang Yin, Federico Lucas, Rolf Balte, John G. Cherng
This paper is to present a systematic study on many critical factors, such as angle of the testing panel, total scanning time of the intensity probe, source room noise level, number of microphones used in the source room, sample size, distance of the microphone in the source room, intensity probe spacer size, measurement time, and receiver room size. Additionally, three noise factors; background noise level, operator and measurement distance were also included. It were discovered that test panel angles and sample sizes were the two most dominant factors. All of above are relevant to experimental SEA or SEA validation process. The complete test results and the experience gained are presented in the paper.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1722
G. Reyes, A. Rasheed, A. Al-Mutar, E. Farha, N. Lotfi
This paper presents the design and manufacture a sandwich structure bumper beam that could withstand at least the same load required to have plastic deformation in a 2002 Jeep Wrangler bumper beam at a lower weight. The dimensions from a bumper beam were scaled down in order to match the limiting length of the sandwich structure specimens. Theoretical optimization calculations were conducted in order to find the optimal dimensions and face thicknesses for the hybrid structures. Sandwich panels were based on Glass Fiber Reinforced Polypropylene (Twintex) and an Aluminum foam core (Alporas). Three point bending tests were performed on the sandwich structures. The resulting failure modes were revealed and found to be in agreement with those offered by the analytical predictions.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0366
Nikhil Bhat, Hong Tae Kang, Vivek Bhise
This paper presents a design and development approach for automotive bucket seat frame using a parametric modeling and a finite element analysis methodology. This approach is expected to help build a lightweight seat structure quickly and efficiently. This approach is general, and it can be applied in designing and developing any mechanical structural component. The design process involves, first parametric modeling of the front bucket seat frame using Pro E. This CAD model was then optimized using optimization software called Optistruct, for two cases of load case and boundary condition. The optimized design was then tested for FMVSS seat requirements using LS-DYNA. The dynamic nature of the design approach helps in changing design parameters during different stages of the design process, until the seat structure satisfies the design criteria and the strength requirements. The construction and testing of this design and the design model are still under progress.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0118
G. Reyes-Villanueva, H. Kang, R. Singh, S. Gupta
This study investigates numerically and experimentally the formability of two Fiber-Metal Laminate systems based on a thermoplastic self-reinforced polypropylene and a glass fiber polypropylene composite materials. These hybrid systems consist of layered arrangements of aluminum 2024-T3 sheets and thermoplastic-based composite materials. Flat panels were manufactured using a fast one step cold press manufacturing procedure. Punch-stretch forming tests and numerical simulations were performed in order to evaluate the formability of the hybrid systems. Experimental and simulation results revealed that the self reinforced thermoplastic composite-based Fiber-Metal Laminate exhibit excellent forming properties similar to that of the monolithic aluminum alloy of comparable thickness.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0117
G. Reyes-Villanueva, S. Gupta
This paper investigates the interfacial fracture properties of composite-metal laminates by using the single-cantilever beam testing technique. The hybrid systems consisted of a layer of aluminum alloy (6061 or 2024-T3) bonded to polypropylene based composites. In this study, two non-chromate surface treatments were applied to the aluminum substrates: SafeGard CC-300 Chrome free seal (from Sanchem Inc.) and TCP-HF (from Metalast International Inc.). These are environmentally friendly surface treatments that enhance the adhesion and corrosion resistance of aluminum alloys. Flat hybrid panels were manufactured using a one step cold press manufacturing procedure. Single cantilever bend specimens were cut from the panels and tested at 1mm/min. Results have shown that the CC-300 treated Al 2024-T3 alloy and Twintex exhibited higher interfacial fracture energy values.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0814
Vivek D. Bhise
With recent advances in microprocessors and data storage technologies, vehicle users can now bring or access large amounts of data in vehicles for purposes such as communication (e.g. e-mail, phone books), entertainment (e.g. music and video files), browsing and searching for information (e.g. on-board computers and internet). The challenge for the vehicle designer is how to design data displays and retrieval methods to allow data search and manipulation tasks by managing driver workload at safe acceptable levels. This paper presents a data retrieval menu system developed to assess levels of screens (depth of menu) that may be needed to select required information when a vehicle is equipped with the capability to access audio files, cell phone, PDA, e-mail and “On-star” type functions.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1277
Chinar Ghike, Taehyun Shim
A vehicle model is an important factor in the development of vehicle control systems. Various vehicle models having different complexities, assumptions, and limitations have been developed and applied to many different vehicle control systems. A 14 DOF vehicle model that includes a roll center as well as non-linear effects due to vehicle roll and pitch angles and unsprung mass inertias, is developed. From this model, the limitations and validity of lower order models which employ different assumptions for simplification of dynamic equations are investigated by analyzing their effect on vehicle roll response through simulation. The possible limitation of the 14 DOF model compared to an actual vehicle is also discussed.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1284
Jamie Gertsch, Taehyun Shim
Yaw and roll stability limits are derived for three quasi-static roll plane models: rigid vehicle, suspended vehicle, and compliant tire vehicle. A generalized stability equation is identified that fits the stability limits for each model. This generalized stability equation leads to the definition of two new parameters referred to as the generalized superelevation and generalized center of gravity height. These parameters are shown to be physically meaningful. The use of linearizing assumptions is minimized and road superelevation is included, resulting in a more complete equation for each stability limit. Each derived stability limit is then compared and contrasted to the typical representations found in the literature.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 85

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: