Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 27 of 27
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2428
Gang Yin, Federico Lucas, Rolf Balte, John G. Cherng
This paper is to present a systematic study on many critical factors, such as angle of the testing panel, total scanning time of the intensity probe, source room noise level, number of microphones used in the source room, sample size, distance of the microphone in the source room, intensity probe spacer size, measurement time, and receiver room size. Additionally, three noise factors; background noise level, operator and measurement distance were also included. It were discovered that test panel angles and sample sizes were the two most dominant factors. All of above are relevant to experimental SEA or SEA validation process. The complete test results and the experience gained are presented in the paper.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0257
D. Sivaraj, P. K. Mallick, P. Mohanty, R. C. McCune
This paper presents a comparison of aqueous corrosion rates in 5% NaCl solution for eight experimental creep-resistant magnesium alloys considered for automotive powertrain applications, as well as three reference alloys (pure magnesium, AM50B and AZ91D). The corrosion rates were measured using the techniques of titration, weight loss, hydrogen evolution, and DC polarization. The corrosion rates measured by these techniques are compared with each other as well as with those obtained with salt-spray testing using ASTM B117. The advantages and disadvantages of the various corrosion measurement techniques are discussed.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0353
C. H. Cheng, L. C. Chan, C. P. Lai, C. L. Chow
In this paper, the formability of Ti-TWBs at different elevated temperatures is experimentally investigated. Ti-TWBs made of Ti-6Al-4V sheets with thicknesses of 0.7mm and 1.0mm are manufactured. Then, the tensile test and forming test at elevated temperatures, ranging from room temperature to 600°C, have been carried out to determine the mechanical properties and the formability of the prepared Ti-TWBs respectively. The effects of elevated temperatures on both the forming and failure behaviors of the Ti-TWBs are examined by comparing with that of the Ti-6Al-4V base metal. It is found that the formability of the Ti-TWBs at room temperature with a dissimilar thickness combination is lower than that of their base metal, whilst the formability of both the Ti-TWBs and their base metal increases with increasing forming temperature. In addition, failures have often been found at the thinner base metal during the Ti-TWB forming, provided that the quality weld is attained without defect.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0192
Hong Tae Kang, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Mark Amaya, John Bonnen, Hua-Chu Shih, Shahuraj Mane, Todd Link
In the North American automotive industry, various advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are used to lighten vehicle structures, improve safety performance and fuel economy, and reduce harmful emissions. Relatively thick gages of AHSS are commonly joined to conventional high strength steels and/or mild steels using Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) in the current generation body-in-white structures. Additionally, fatigue failures are most likely to occur at joints subjected to a variety of different loadings. It is therefore critical that automotive engineers need to understand the fatigue characteristics of welded joints. The Sheet Steel Fatigue Committee of the Auto/Steel Partnership (A/S-P) completed a comprehensive fatigue study on GMAW joints of both AHSS and conventional sheet steels including: DP590 GA, SAE 1008, HSLA HR 420, DP 600 HR, Boron, DQSK, TRIP 780 GI, and DP780 GI steels.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-0771
Shardul Bhambure, Pankaj K. Mallick
This study considers the thermal stresses in single lap adhesive joints between magnesium and steel. The source of thermal stresses is the large difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion of magnesium and steel. Two different temperature differentials from the ambient conditions (23°C) were considered, namely -30°C and +50°C. Thermal stresses were determined using finite element analysis. In addition to Mg-steel substrate combination, Mg-Mg and steel-steel combinations were also studied. Combined effect of temperature variation and applied load was also explored. It was observed that temperature increase or decrease can cause significant thermal stresses in the adhesive layer and thermal stress distribution in the adhesive layer depends on the substrate combination and the applied load.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0752
Pranab Sen Choudhury, Pankaj Mallick
With increasing use of biofuels in the automotive industry, it has become necessary to evaluate their effects on the properties of polymers used in the fuel delivery systems. In this study, we have considered the effect of biodiesel on the tensile properties of nylon-6, 30% E-glass fiber reinforced nylon-6 and impact-modified nylon-6. The tensile specimens were immersed in 100% biodiesel for up to 7 days before determining their tensile properties. Another set of specimens were immersed in 100% biodiesel under stressed condition and then their tensile properties were determined. The absorption of biodiesel and their effects on tensile modulus, tensile strength and failure strain are reported in this paper.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980079
M. Y. Demeri, C. L. Chow, W. H. Tai
Strains in most stamped parts are produced under non-proportional loading. Limit strains induced during forming are, therefore, path dependent. Experimental Forming Limit Diagrams (FLDs) are usually determined under proportional loading and are not applicable to most forming operations. Experimental results have shown that path dependent FLDs are different from those determined under proportional loading. A number of analytical methods have been used to predict FLDs under proportional loading. The authors have recently introduced a new method for predicting FLDs based on the theory of damage mechanics. The damage model was used successfully to predict proportional FLDs for VDIF steel and Al6111-T4. In this paper, the anisotropic damage model was used to predict non-proportional FLDs for VDIF steel. Experiments were conducted to validate model predictions by applying pre-stretch in plane strain followed by uniaxial and balanced biaxial tension.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1709
Vivek Bhise, Roger Shulze, Huzefa Mamoola, Jeffrey Bonner
This paper describes a unique interior design and multidisciplinary process implemented by the faculty and students to develop the interior for a Low Mass Vehicle (LMV). The 103 inch LMV was designed with the goal of about 30% reduction in weight than a typical class C segment vehicle and would require low investment in manufacturing. In the early stages of the program, the UM-Dearborn team developed detailed requirements of the vehicle interior based on the vehicle's exterior developed using a similar process. The requirements were given to a senior class of automotive design students from the College of Creative Studies in Detroit to create different interior design themes. Approximately twenty-five interior design themes were judged by a panel of automotive industry experts, and a winning design was selected.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0973
Vivek D. Bhise, Rashad Hammoudeh, Radhakrishnan Nagarajan, James D. Dowd, Marc Hayes
The automotive interior suppliers are challenged to develop materials, that not only perform functionally, but also provide the right combination sensory experience (e.g. visual appeal, tactile feeling) and brand differentiation at very competitive costs. Therefore, the objective of this research presented in this paper is to develop a methodology that can be used to measure customer perception of interior materials and to come up with a unique system for assessing value of different interior materials. The overall methodology involves the application of a number of psychophysical measurement methods (e.g. Semantic Differential Scaling) and statistical methods to assess: 1) overall customer perceived quality of materials, 2) elements (or attributes) of perception, and 3) value of materials from OEM's viewpoint in terms of the measurement of perception of quality divided by a measure of cost.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0144
Lavish Agarwal, P. K. Mallick, H. T. Kang
Spot friction welding is considered a cost-effective method for joining lightweight automotive alloys, such as magnesium and aluminum alloys. An experimental study was conducted to investigate the strength of spot friction welded joints of magnesium to magnesium, aluminum to aluminum, magnesium to aluminum and aluminum to magnesium. The joint structures and failure modes were also studied.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-1446
Sergey F. Golovashchenko, Andrey M. Ilinich
Current die design recommendations attempt to limit the production of burrs through accurate alignment of the upper and lower edges. For common automotive exterior sheet, this translates to a gap less than 0.06mm. Unfortunately, the tolerances required by such standards often exceed the capabilities of many trim dies. The objective of the research described in this paper is to study the mechanisms of burrs generation and their impact on AHSS formability in stretch flanging. Experimental results on influence of trimming conditions on the shape of the sheared surface will be combined with the results of stretching strips after trimming.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1474
Vivek Bhise, Rhita Boufelliga, Thomas Roney, James Dowd, Marc Hayes
The objective of the paper is to present a unique design approach and its outputs: the design concepts for automotive center consoles for a near term SUV that can be produced in 2-3 years, and the second for, a more futuristic SUV, that could be produced in 10 or more years. In the first phase of this two phase project, we benchmarked center consoles from a number of existing and concept vehicles, analyzed available data (e.g. J.D. Power customer feedback surveys), and conducted studies (e.g. survey of items stored in the vehicles, item location preferences in the console area) to understand customer/user needs in designing the center consoles. In the second phase, we provided the information generated in the first phase to four groups of student teams who competed to create winning designs of the center consoles.
2009-04-20
Journal Article
2009-01-0017
Vivek D. Bhise, Pankaj K. Mallick, Vishnuvardhan H. Sarma
This paper presents results of a three-phase research project aimed at understanding how future automotive interior materials should be selected or designed to satisfy the needs of the customers. The first project phase involved development of 22 five-point semantic differential scales to measure visual, visual-tactile, and evaluative characteristics of the materials. Some examples of the adjective pairs used to create the semantic differential scales to measure the perceptual characteristics of the material are: a) Visual: Light vs. Dark, Flat vs. Shiny, etc., b) Visual-Tactile: Smooth vs. Rough, Slippery vs. Sticky, Compressive vs. Non-Compressive, Textured vs. Non-Textured, etc., c) Evaluative (overall perception): Dislike vs. Like, Fake vs. Genuine, Cheap vs. Expensive, etc. In the second phase, 12 younger and 12 older drivers were asked to evaluate a number of different automotive interior materials by using the 22 semantic differential scales.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-0037
Kimberly Lazarz, Robert C. McCune, Wenchao Wang, P. K. Mallick
This study reports the performance of three different automotive magnesium substrate materials (AM60B diecastings, AZ31-H24 sheet, and AM30 extrusions), each bonded to a common aluminum reference material with two different toughened adhesives. The magnesium substrates were pretreated with six different commercial pretreatments both with and without a final fused-powder polymeric topcoat. These samples were then evaluated by comparing initial lap-shear strength to the lap-shear strength after cyclic-corrosion testing. Additionally, use of a scribe through the polymer primer permitted assessment of: 1) distance of corrosion undercutting from the scribe (filiform), and 2) percent corrosion over the area of the coupon. The results showed that the performance of each magnesium pretreatment varied on cast AM60B, sheet AZ31-H24, and extruded AM30 substrates.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1722
G. Reyes, A. Rasheed, A. Al-Mutar, E. Farha, N. Lotfi
This paper presents the design and manufacture a sandwich structure bumper beam that could withstand at least the same load required to have plastic deformation in a 2002 Jeep Wrangler bumper beam at a lower weight. The dimensions from a bumper beam were scaled down in order to match the limiting length of the sandwich structure specimens. Theoretical optimization calculations were conducted in order to find the optimal dimensions and face thicknesses for the hybrid structures. Sandwich panels were based on Glass Fiber Reinforced Polypropylene (Twintex) and an Aluminum foam core (Alporas). Three point bending tests were performed on the sandwich structures. The resulting failure modes were revealed and found to be in agreement with those offered by the analytical predictions.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0995
Q. Le, H. Kang, A. Khosrovaneh, C. Y. Sa, B. Yan
The component being formed experiences some type of prestrain that may have an effect on its fatigue strength. This study investigated the forming effects on material fatigue strength of dual phase sheet steel (DP600) subjected to various uniaxial prestrains. In the as-received condition, DP600 specimens were tested for tensile properties to determine the prestraining level based on the uniform elongation corresponding to the maximum strength of DP600 on the stress-strain curve. Three different levels of prestrain at 90%, 70% and 50% of the uniform elongation were applied to uniaxial prestrain specimens for tensile tests and fatigue tests. Fatigue tests were conducted with strain controlled to obtain fatigue properties and compare them with the as-received DP600. The fatigue test results were presented with strain amplitude and Neuber's factor.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1217
Vivek D. Bhise, Sonal Onkar, Marc Hayes, Jim Dalpizzol, James Dowd
This paper presents results of a five phase study conducted to evaluate touch feel and appearance of door armrest materials. Seven different production door armrests with different material characteristics such as softness, smoothness, compressibility, texture, etc. were evaluated. In the first phase, the subjects seated in a vehicle buck in their preferred seating position with the armrests adjusted at their preferred heights, provided ratings on a number of touch feel and appearance of the door armrest materials using 5-point semantic differential scales. In the second phase, the armrests were presented to each subject in all possible pairs and they were asked to select preferred armrest material in each pair.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1265
Nia R. Harrison, S. George Luckey, Breana Cappuccilli, Ghassan Kridli
Abstract The typical paint bake cycle includes multiple ramps and dwells of temperature through e-coat, paint, and clear coat with exposure equivalent to approximately 190°C for up to 60 minutes. 7xxx-series aluminum alloys are heat treatable, additional thermal exposure such as a paint bake cycle could alter the material properties. Therefore, this study investigates the response of three 7xxx-series aluminum alloys with respect to conductivity, hardness, and yield strength when exposed to three oven curing cycles of a typical automotive paint operation. The results have indicated that alloy composition and artificial aging practice influence the material response to the various paint bake cycles.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0343
Xiao Wu, Zhigang Wei, HongTae Kang, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh
Abstract Over the decades, several attempts have been made to develop new fatigue analysis methods for welded joints since most of the incidents in automotive structures are joints related. Therefore, a reliable and effective fatigue damage parameter is needed to properly predict the failure location and fatigue life of these welded structures to reduce the hardware testing, time, and the associated cost. The nodal force-based structural stress approach is becoming widely used in fatigue life assessment of welded structures. In this paper, a new nodal force-based structural stress recovery procedure is proposed that uses the least squares method to linearly smooth the stresses in elements along the weld line. Weight function is introduced to give flexibility in choosing different weighting schemes between elements. Two typical weighting schemes are discussed and compared.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0776
C.L. Chow, W.H. Tai, Sing Tang
In this paper, a predictive method is developed to determine the forming limit strain and fracture limit strain in a stamped automotive component subjected to a complex strain history that would be experienced during an actual forming operation. The method of analysis is based on a damage mechanics model developed recently by the authors and extended to take into account the hysteretic effects of the principal strain and damage planes. The forming limit and fracture limit strains are then predicted using the modified damage model. Satisfactory predictions have been achieved for a practical case where the complex strain history is prescribed based an actual stamping operation.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0772
Ghassan T. Kridli, Peter A. Friedman, Andrew M. Sherman
The use of tailor welded blanks (TWBs) in automotive applications is increasing due to the potential of weight and cost savings. These blanks are manufactured by joining two or more sheets of dissimilar gauge, properties, or both, to form a lighter blank of desired strength and stiffness. This allows an engineer to “tailor” the properties of the blank to meet the design requirements of a particular panel. TWBs are used in such places as door inner panels, lift gates, and floor pans. Earlier investigations of the use of TWBs targeted steel alloys, but the potential of further weight savings with aluminum TWBs is gaining interest in the automotive industry. Unlike steel TWBs, the welds in aluminum TWBs are not significantly stronger than the base material and are occasionally the fracture site. Additionally, the reduced formability of aluminum, as compared with drawing-quality steels, makes the application of aluminum TWBs more difficult than steel TWBs.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0045
P. K. Mallick, P. Daly
Current plastic intake manifolds are manufactured using the injection molding process. In this paper, thermoforming is explored as an alternative to injection molding for making intake manifold shells, which can then be joined by one of the welding techniques used for thermoplastic materials. The investigation reported here includes press-forming experiments of a simple bowl shaped shell and subsequent welding experiments to join these shells.
2001-03-05
Technical Paper
2001-01-1129
C. L. Chow, X. J. Yang, E. Chu
LS-DYNA3D has been widely used to perform computer simulation of sheet metal forming. In the material library of LS-DYNA3D there are a number of user defined material models. In order to take full advantage of the material subroutines, it is important for the users to be able to display user defined history variables in the post processing and to establish user-defined failure criterion. In this report, the development of a damage coupled plastic model is firstly described. The damage model is then programmed in a user defined material subroutine. This is followed by performing finite element simulation of sheet metal forming with the LS-DYNA3D that has incorporated the damage coupled plastic model. The way to display the user defined history variables and how to deal with the failure criterion during the postprocessing of ETA/DYNAFORM are described. History variable distributions at several time steps are displayed and discussed in this paper.
2002-06-03
Technical Paper
2002-01-1891
D. Kanawade, G. Jandali, G. T. Kridli, P. K. Mallick
This paper presents cost-benefit analysis of glass and carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic matrix composites for structural automotive applications based on press forming operation. Press forming is very similar to stamping operation for steel. The structural automotive applications involve beam type components. The part selected for a case study analysis is a crossbeam support for instrument panels.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0118
G. Reyes-Villanueva, H. Kang, R. Singh, S. Gupta
This study investigates numerically and experimentally the formability of two Fiber-Metal Laminate systems based on a thermoplastic self-reinforced polypropylene and a glass fiber polypropylene composite materials. These hybrid systems consist of layered arrangements of aluminum 2024-T3 sheets and thermoplastic-based composite materials. Flat panels were manufactured using a fast one step cold press manufacturing procedure. Punch-stretch forming tests and numerical simulations were performed in order to evaluate the formability of the hybrid systems. Experimental and simulation results revealed that the self reinforced thermoplastic composite-based Fiber-Metal Laminate exhibit excellent forming properties similar to that of the monolithic aluminum alloy of comparable thickness.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0117
G. Reyes-Villanueva, S. Gupta
This paper investigates the interfacial fracture properties of composite-metal laminates by using the single-cantilever beam testing technique. The hybrid systems consisted of a layer of aluminum alloy (6061 or 2024-T3) bonded to polypropylene based composites. In this study, two non-chromate surface treatments were applied to the aluminum substrates: SafeGard CC-300 Chrome free seal (from Sanchem Inc.) and TCP-HF (from Metalast International Inc.). These are environmentally friendly surface treatments that enhance the adhesion and corrosion resistance of aluminum alloys. Flat hybrid panels were manufactured using a one step cold press manufacturing procedure. Single cantilever bend specimens were cut from the panels and tested at 1mm/min. Results have shown that the CC-300 treated Al 2024-T3 alloy and Twintex exhibited higher interfacial fracture energy values.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1709
Zhigang Wei, Sarat Das, Ryan Barr, Greg Rohrs, Robert Rebandt, Xiao Wu, HongTae Kang
Abstract Recent stringent government regulations on emission control and fuel economy drive the vehicles and their associated components and systems to the direction of lighter weight. However, the achieved lightweight must not be obtained by sacrificing other important performance requirements such as manufacturability, strength, durability, reliability, safety, noise, vibration and harshness (NVH). Additionally, cost is always a dominating factor in the lightweight design of automotive products. Therefore, a successful lightweight design can only be accomplished by better understanding the performance requirements, the potentials and limitations of the designed products, and by balancing many conflicting design parameters. The combined knowledge-based design optimization procedures and, inevitably, some trial-and-error design iterations are the practical approaches that should be adopted in the lightweight design for the automotive applications.
Viewing 1 to 27 of 27

    Filter

    • Range:
      to:
    • Year: