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Viewing 1 to 30 of 40
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0957
Jian Jun Zhu, Amir Khajepour, Ebrahim Esmailzadeh, Alireza Kasaiezadeh
In a conventional vehicle, the longitudinal shocks caused by the road obstacles cannot be effectively absorbed due to the fact that the longitudinal connections between the chassis and wheels are typically very stiff compared with the vertical strut where the regular spring is mounted. To overcome this limitation, a concept design of a planar suspension system (PSS) is proposed. The rather stiff longitudinal linkages are replaced by a spring-damping strut in a PSS so that the vibration along any direction in the wheel plane can be effectively isolated. For a vehicle with such suspension systems, the wheels can move forth and back with respect to the chassis. The wheelbase and load distribution at the front and rear wheels can change as a consequence of the implementation of the PSS on a vehicle. The planar system can induce changes in the vehicle dynamic behavior. This paper presents the overview introduction of a dynamic study of a vehicle with such suspension systems.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0083
Lu Fan, Bing Zhou, Harry Zheng
In vehicles equipped with conventional Electric Power Steering (EPS) systems, the steering effort felt by the driver can be unreasonably low when driving on slippery roads. This may lead inexperienced drivers to steer more than what is required in a turn and risk losing control of the vehicle. Thus, it is sensible for tire-road friction to be accounted for in the design of future EPS systems. This paper describes the design of an auxiliary EPS controller that manipulates torque delivery of current EPS systems by supplying its motor with a compensation current controlled by a fuzzy logic algorithm that considers tire-road friction among other factors. Moreover, a steering system model, a nonlinear vehicle dynamics model and a Dugoff tire model are developed in MATLAB/Simulink. Physical testing is conducted to validate the virtual model and confirm that steering torque decreases considerably on low friction roads.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1015
Dan Kraehling, David Anderson, Michael Worswick, Tim Skszek
Abstract The effect of stress triaxiality on failure strain in as-cast magnesium alloy AM60B is examined. Experiments using one uniaxial and two notched tensile geometries were used to study the effect of stress triaxiality on the quasi-static constitutive response of super vacuum die cast AM60B castings. For all tests, local strains, failure location and specimen elongation were tracked using two-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) analysis. The uniaxial specimens were tested in two orthogonal directions to determine the anisotropy of the casting. Finite element models were developed to estimate effective plastic strain histories and stress state (triaxiality) as a function of notch severity. It was found that there is minimal, if any, anisotropy present in AM60B castings. Higher stress triaxiality levels caused increases in maximum stress and decreases in elongation and local effective plastic strain at failure.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0385
Ramin Masoudi, Hadi Adibi asl, Nasser Lashgarian Azad, John McPhee
Abstract Parameter identification of a math-based spark-ignition engine model is studied in this paper. Differential-algebraic equations governing the dynamic behavior of the engine combustion model are derived using a quasi-dimensional modelling scheme. The model is developed based on the two-zone combustion theory with turbulent flame propagation through the combustion chamber [1]. The system of equations includes physics-based equations combined with the semi-empirical Wiebe function. The GT-Power engine simulator software [2], a powerful tool for design and development of engines, is used to extract the reference data for the engine parameter identification. The models is GT-Power are calibrated and validated with experimental results; thus, acquired data from the software can be a reliable reference for engine validation purposes.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0571
Usman Ali, Roydon Andrew Fraser
In this paper, finite element methods are used to analyze the rear subframe for Chevrolet Malibu. Plasticity based material model along with dynamic and static analysis is used. Commercial software LS-DYNA is used to model the subframe. Half model for the subframe is used with the corresponding boundary conditions for our simulations. A material model based on power law is used to account for the material behavior in all simulations. Different loading conditions are used to analyze the subframe under normal driving conditions while the crash results are used to analyze the subframe under vehicle crash. This data is used to compare the performance and safety of the original stock car. A parametric study is also conducted to analyze the effect of material response by changing the material hardening properties. Results show that 1018 mild steel is the most suitable material under crash and normal loading conditions.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-0608
Ryan George, Michael J. Worswick, Duane Detwiler, Jidong Kang
This paper presents the numerical validation of the impact response of a hot formed B-pillar component with tailored properties. A laboratory-scale B-pillar tool is considered with integral heating and cooling sections in an effort to locally control the cooling rate of an austenitized blank, thereby producing a part with tailored microstructures to potentially improve the impact response of these components. An instrumented falling-weight drop tower was used to impact the lab-scale B-pillars in a modified 3-point bend configuration to assess the difference between a component in the fully hardened (martensitic) state and a component with a tailored region (consisting of bainite and ferrite). Numerical models were developed using LS-DYNA to simulate the forming and thermal history of the part to estimate the final thickness and strain distributions as well as the predicted microstructures.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1358
Paul Goossens, Avesta Goodarzi
A predictive model of a specific vehicle was modeled in the system-level physical modeling tool, MapleSim, for performance and fuel consumption prediction of a full vehicle powertrain, driving a multi-body chassis model with tire models. The project also includes investigation into overall fuel efficiency and effect on vehicle handling for different drive cycles. The goals of this project were to investigate: 1) the relationships between the forces at tire/road interfaces during various drive cycles and the fuel efficiency of a vehicle, and 2) the interaction between the powertrain and the chassis of the vehicle. To accomplish these goals, a complete vehicle model was created in the lumped-parameter physical modeling tool, MapleSim. A great deal of effort has gone into using real parameters and to assure that some mathematical rigour has been employed in its development.
2013-10-14
Journal Article
2013-01-2560
Joydeep Banerjee, John McPhee, Paul Goossens, Thanh-Son Dao, Hyun-Doo ahn
The analysis of nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery performance is very important for automotive researchers and manufacturers. The performance of a battery can be described as a direct consequence of various chemical and physical phenomena taking place inside the container. In this paper, a physics-based model of a Ni-MH battery will be presented. To analyze its performance, the efficiency of the battery is chosen as the performance measure, which is defined as the ratio of the energy output from the battery and the energy input to the battery while charging. Parametric sensitivity analysis will be used to generate sensitivity information for the state variables of the model. The generated information will be used to showcase how sensitivity information can be used to identify unique model behavior and how it can be used to optimize the capacity of the battery. The results will be validated using a finite difference formulation.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-39-7201
Thank-Son Dao, Aden Seaman, John McPhee, Koichi Shigematsu
The recent increase in oil prices and environmental concerns have attracted various research efforts on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) which provide promising alternatives to conventional engine-powered vehicles with better fuel economy and fewer emissions. To speed up the design and prototyping processes of new HEVs, a method that automatically generates mathematics equations governing the vehicle system response in an optimized symbolic form is desirable. To achieve this goal, we employed MapleSimTM, a new physical modeling tool developed by Maplesoft Inc., to develop the multi-domain model of a series-HEV, utilizing the symbolic computing algorithms of Maple software package to generate an optimized set of governing equations. The HEV model consists of a mean-value internal combustion engine (ICE), a chemistry-based Ni-MH battery pack, and a multibody vehicle model. Simulations are then used to demonstrate the performance of the developed HEV system.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980491
Michel St.Pierre, Bill Moreau, Ross Nairn, Roydon A. Fraser
The conversion design strategy, and emissions and performance results for a dedicated propane, vapour injected, 1995 Dodge Dakota truck are reported. Data is obtained from the University of Waterloo entry in the 1997 Propane Vehicle Challenge. A key feature of the design strategy is its focus on testing and emissions while preserving low engine speed power for drivability. Major changes to the Dakota truck included the following: installation of a custom shaped fuel tank, inclusion of a fuel temperature control module, addition of a vaporizer and a fuel delivery metering unit, installation of a custom vapour distribution manifold, addition of an equivalence ratio electronic controller, inclusion of a wide range oxygen sensor, addition of an exhaust gas recirculation cooler and installation of thermal insulation on the exhaust system. A competition provided natural gas catalyst was used.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920634
John A. Schey, S.W.A. Watts
Details of the development of metal transfer and friction were studied by drawing cold-rolled bare, galvannealed, electrogalvanized, and hot-dip galvanized strips with a mineral-oil lubricant of 30 cSt viscosity at 40 C, over a total distance of 2500 mm by three methods. An initial high friction peak was associated with metal transfer to the beads and was largest with pure zinc and smallest with Fe-Zn coatings. Insertion of a new strip disturbed the coating and led to the development of secondary peaks. Long-term trends were governed by the stability of the coating. Stearic acid added to mineral oil delayed stabilization of the coating and increased contact area and thus friction with pure zinc surfaces. The usual practice of reporting average friction values can hide valuable information on lubrication mechanisms and metal transfer.
1994-03-01
Technical Paper
940329
Jianfang Zhang, Roydon A. Fraser, Allan B. Strong
Direct injected natural gas diesel engines are currently being developed. Numerical analyses results are presented for 20.0 MPa (≈ 3000 psia; 200 atm), 444 K, natural gas injection into 4.0 MPa cylinder air where the ambient turbulence field is representative of diesel engines. Two very important non-intuitive, observations are made. First, the seemingly reasonable spatially uniform velocity profile currently used at the injector exit is not appropriate, rather a double-hump profile is correct. Second, a spatially uniform, injector exit, temperature profile results in local temperature overestimates as large as 300 K. Considering the strong role of temperature on chemical kinetics, this second observation may have profound implications on the validity of conclusions reached using uniform exit profiles.
1995-09-01
Technical Paper
952089
F. Honarvar, H. R. Martin
The detection and tracking of the damage process between surfaces in contact, together with an estimation of the remaining service life, are significant contributions to the efficient operation of hydraulic components. The commonly used approach of analyzing vibration signals in terms of spectral distributions, while being very effective, has some shortcomings. For example, the results are sensitive to both load and speed variations. The approach presented in this paper is based on the fact that the asperity distribution of surfaces in good condition have a near normal probability distribution. Deviation from this can be tracked using statistical moments. The Beta probability distribution provides a number of shapes, including normal, under the control of two positive numbers, α and β. Unlike the normal distribution, which indicates defects by kurtosis values higher than 3.0, the Beta distribution provides more flexibility.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1312
Chris Mendes, Roydon Fraser, Steve Lambert
The objective of this paper is to help students optimize project component selection or design by detailing, through two specific examples, the University of Waterloo's Alternative Fuels Team's (UWAFT's) successful design process. UWAFT successfully designed a fuel cell powered vehicle for the ChallengeX student engineering competition. The use of a formal, structured design process enabled this team to achieve great confidence in both the feasibility of their design and their ability to manifest the design. This design process is model-based whereby a parameterized software model is created. This paper hopefully assists students to overcome a common reluctance to implementing a model-based design process. After a component is constructed and tested, students can update their software model, which can help them assess the strength of their design.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1022
Byeongcho Lee, Amir Khajepour, Kamran Behdinan
This paper proposes a vehicle performance/safety method using combined active steering and differential braking to achieve yaw stability and rollover avoidance. The advantages and disadvantages of active steering and differential braking control methods are identified under a variety of input signals, such as J-turn, sinusoidal, and fishhook inputs by using the implemented linear 4 DOF model. Also, the nonlinear model of the vehicle is evaluated and verified through individual and integrated controller. Each controller gives the correction steering angle and correction moment to the simplified steering and braking actuators. The integrated active steering and differential braking control are shown to be most efficient in achieving yaw stability and rollover avoidance, while active steering and differential braking control has been shown to improve the vehicle performance and safety only in yaw stability and rollover avoidance, respectively.
2006-10-31
Technical Paper
2006-01-3568
N. L. Azad, A. Khajepour, J. McPhee
In this study, application of differential braking strategy to remove the oscillatory instability or snaking behavior of an articulated steer vehicle is presented. First, a linearized model of the vehicle is described that is used to represent the equations of motion in the state-space form. Then, this model is utilized for designing a sliding mode controller to adjust the differential braking on the rear axle to stabilize the vehicle during the snaking. The performance of the resulting active control system is evaluated in different driving conditions by using the linearized model. Finally, the control system is incorporated into a virtual prototype of the vehicle in ADAMS, and its operation is examined. The results from the linear model analysis and simulations in ADAMS are reasonably consistent.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0835
J. Gholipour, M. J. Worswick, D. Oliveira
This paper examines the application of damage models in tube bending and subsequent hydroforming of AlMg3.5Mn aluminum alloy tubes. An in-house Gurson-based damage model, incorporated within LS-DYNA, has been used for the simulations. The applied damage model contains several void nucleation and growth parameters that must be determined for each material. A simpler straight tube hydroforming process was considered first to check the damage parameters and predicted ductility. Then the model was applied to a sequence of bending and hydroforming. The damage history from pre-bending was mapped to the hydroforming stage, to allow prediction of the overall ductility. The applied forming parameters in the simulation were based on data extracted during the experimental tests. Finally, the numerical results were compared to the experimental data.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-3117
Reza Madjlesi, Amir Khajepour, Fathy Ismail, Joe Mihalic, Bernie Rice
Many design problems are discovered often late in the development process, when design flexibility is limited. It is the art of the refinement engineers to find a solution to any unpredicted issues at this stage. The refinement process contains many hours of testing and requires many prototypes. Having an accurate experimental model of the system in this phase could reduce refinement time significantly. One of the areas that usually require refinement and tuning late in the design process is engine and body mounting systems. In this paper, we introduce a technique to optimize the mounting system of a vehicle for a given objective function using experimental/numerical analysis. To obtain an accurate model of the vehicle, we introduce an experimental procedure based upon the substructuring method. The method eliminates the need for any accurate finite element method of the vehicle. Experimental results of the implementation of this approach to a real vehicle are presented.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1313
O. Vahid, C. R. Urbaniak, A. Khajepour
This paper deals with an identification method for engine rigid body inertia properties based on available accelerometer data at mount locations. Unlike other rigid body direct physical parameter identification methods, here inertia properties are extracted from an assembled engine under operating conditions. In addition to acceleration responses, only mount dynamic stiffness measurements are required and there is no need to measure unbalance forces and moments of engine. Using a linear frequency-domain model of engine, mounts, and chassis, a general algorithm is developed.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0742
Zengtao Chen, Michael Worswick, Keith Pilkey, David Lloyd
A so-called damage percolation model is coupled with Gurson-based finite element (FE) approach in order to accommodate the high strain gradients and localized ductile damage. In doing so, void coalescence and final failure are suppressed in Gurson-based FE modeling while a measured second phase particle field is mapped onto the most damaged mesh area so that percolation modeling can be performed to capture ductile fracture in real sheet forming operations. It is revealed that void nucleation within particle clusters dominates ductile fracture in aluminum alloy sheet forming. Coalescence among several particle clusters triggered final failure of materials. A stretch flange forming is simulated with the coupled modeling.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-2837
J. N. Dyment, M. J. Worswick, F. Normani, D. A. Oliveira, G. Khodayari
This research examines the effect of endfeed on the thickness and strains during bending of steel tubes. The tubes were bent using an instrumented rotary draw tube bender and subsequently hydroformed into a diamond-profile outside corner fill die. DQAK tubes with an OD of 76.2 mm and a thickness of 1.55 mm were investigated. Endfeed during bending was found to have a significant effect on the thickness and strains within the tube after bending, and numerical models that were generated showed good agreement with the experimental data. It is shown how slight changes in thickness can cause localized failure during hydroforming, and how excessive die clearances can cause large strains in undesired areas.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0314
J. Park, X. Li
A serpentine flow channel can be considered as neighboring channels connected in series, and is one of the most common and practical channel layouts for PEM fuel cells since it ensures the removal of liquid water produced in a cell with excellent performance and acceptable parasitic load. During the reactant flows along the flow channel, it can also leak or cross directly to the neighboring channel via the porous gas diffusion layer due to the high pressure gradient caused by the short distance. Such a cross flow leads to a larger effective flow area resulting in a substantially lower amount of pressure drop in an actual PEM fuel cell compared to the case without cross flow. In this work, an analytical solution is obtained for the cross flow in a PEM fuel cell with a serpentine flow channel based on the assumption that the velocity of cross flow is linearly distributed in the gas diffusion layer between two successive U-turns.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-1442
A. Bardelcik, M. J. Worswick
Abstract The Extended Stress-Based Forming Limit Curve (XSFLC) failure criterion has been shown to provide good qualitative and quantitative predictions of failure (necking) in straight tube hydro forming when the on the level of end-feed (EF) used during hydro forming, the failure criterion has a tendency to over predict failure pressure at low Keeler-Brazier (K-B) approximation is used to define the XSFLC failure curve. Depending EF and under predict failure pressure for high EF. The over/under predictions suggest that the strain-space εFLC, which the XSFLC is based on, has too high of a plane-strain intercept (FLCo), when it is obtained using the K-B approximation (developed for sheet metal).
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0589
Kiumars Jalali, Kai Bode, Steve Lambert, John McPhee
The vision for the future automotive chassis is to interconnect the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical dynamics by separately controlling driving, braking, steering, and damping of each individual wheel. A major advantage of all wheel drive electric vehicles with four in-wheel motors is the possibility to control the torque and speed at each wheel independently. This paper proposes a traction controller for such a vehicle. It estimates the road's adhesion potential at each wheel and adjusts each motor voltage, such that the longitudinal slip is kept in an optimal range. For development and validation, a full vehicle model is designed in ADAMS/View software, in co-simulation with motor and control elements, modeled in MATLAB/Simulink.
2008-12-02
Technical Paper
2008-01-2982
Kin Yuen, Christopher Thom, Duane Cronin
Vehicles designed for the Baja SAE competition operate on challenging off-road terrain and may be required to withstand accidental impacts with other vehicles and obstacles. Although significant injuries are not commonly observed in this competition, it is important to understand the performance of these vehicles in crash scenarios to optimize frame design and vehicle performance. A finite element model comprising the vehicle chassis and associated subsystem weights, a Hybrid III occupant, and safety systems was developed to evaluate vehicle impact performance in frontal crash. Impacts velocities up to 36 kph were considered, and no significant risk of head, neck or thoracic injury was predicted. Neck injury (as predicted by Nij) and chest acceleration were found to be the most critical, reaching 66% and 75% of their threshold values, respectively, in the most severe crashes considered.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-0360
Dongpu Cao, Amir Khajepour, Jianjun Zhu, Zhihong Yin
Ride performance characteristics of a road vehicle involving different suspension system layouts are investigated. The suspension layouts consist of conventional rectangular 4-wheel, novel diamond-shaped 4-wheel, triangular 3-wheel and inverse-triangular 3-wheel. A generalized full-vehicle model integrating different suspension system layouts is formulated. The fundamental suspension properties are compared in terms of bounce-, roll- and pitch-mode. The ride dynamic responses and power consumption characteristics are explored under two measured road roughness excitations and a range of vehicle speeds. The results demonstrate that the novel diamond-shaped suspension system layout could yield significantly enhanced vehicle ride performance in an energy-saving manner.
2009-04-20
Journal Article
2009-01-0435
Kiumars Jalali, Thomas Uchida, John McPhee, Steve Lambert
An electric vehicle model has been developed with four direct-drive in-wheel motors. A high-level vehicle stability controller is proposed, which uses the principles of fuzzy logic to determine the corrective yaw moment required to minimize the vehicle sideslip and yaw rate errors. A genetic algorithm has been used to optimize the parameters of the fuzzy controller. The performance of the controller is evaluated as the vehicle is driven through a double-lane-change maneuver. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed control system has the ability to improve the performance of the vehicle considerably.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0680
Renhua Feng, Yangtao Li, Jing Yang, Jianqin FU, Daming Zhang, Guangze Zheng
Abstract Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are considered as the most commercial prospects new energy vehicles. Most HEVs have adopted Atkinson cycle engine as the main drive power. Atkinson cycle engine uses late intake valve closing (LIVC) to reduce pumping losses and compression work in part load operation. It can transform more heat energy to mechanical energy, improve engine thermal efficiency and decrease fuel consumption. In this paper, the investigations of Atkinson cycle converted from conventional Otto cycle gasoline engine have been carried out. First of all, high geometry compression ratio (CR) has been optimized through piston redesign from 10.5 to 13 in order to overcome the intrinsic drawback of Atkinson cycle in that combustion performance deteriorates due to the decline in the effective CR. Then, both intake and exhaust cam profile have been redesigned to meet the requirements of Atkinson cycle engine.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1565
Joydeep Banerjee, John McPhee
Abstract Dynamic modelling of the contact between the tires of automobiles and the road surface is crucial for accurate and effective vehicle dynamic simulation and the development of various driving controllers. Furthermore, an accurate prediction of the rolling resistance is needed for powertrain controllers and controllers designed to reduce fuel consumption and engine emissions. Existing models of tires include physics-based analytical models, finite element based models, black box models, and data driven empirical models. The main issue with these approaches is that none of these models offer the balance between accuracy of simulation and computational cost that is required for the model-based development cycle. To address this issue, we present a volumetric approach to model the forces/moments between the tire and the road for vehicle dynamic simulations.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1051
Zengtao Chen, Michael Worswick, Oleg Orlov, Mark Finn, David Lloyd
Stretch flange features are commonly found in the corner regions of commercial parts, such as window cutouts, where large strains can induce localization and necking. In this study, laboratory-scale stretch flange forming experiments on AA5182 and AA5754 were conducted to address the formability of these aluminum alloys under undergoing this specific deformation process. Two distinct cracking modes were found in the stretch flange samples. One is radial cracking at the inner edge of flange (cutout edge) while the other is circumferential cracking away from the inner edge at the punch profile radius. Numerical simulation of the stretch flange forming operations was conducted with an explicit finite element code-LS-DYNA. A coalescence-suppressed Gurson-based material model is used in the finite element model. Void coalescence and final failure in stretch flange is simulated through measured second-phase particle fields with a so-called damage percolation model.
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