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Viewing 1 to 14 of 14
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980346
Mike Luettgen
This paper describes a method for calculating the temperature of a semi-infinite heat sink plate of a given thickness, subjected to transient heating by a D2Pak power IC. Accurate prediction of the heat sink temperature over time then allows for more accurate calculation of the IC junction temperature. A set of curves have been developed for the time variation of heat sink plate temperature. This has been achieved by the use of finite element methods, and modeling a large range of configurations. The system variables were put into dimensionless form, and the model results plotted. The resulting plot indicates an effective thermal resistance of a given heat sink plate at a given point in time. A curve fit has also performed on the results. The results of the finite element model have been compared with laboratory data.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980973
Rose A. Ryntz, Brad D. Abell, Felicia Hermosillo
The scratch resistance of automotive plastic coatings has been studied extensively over the past few years. Most testing methodology to correlate damage of the coating to field conditions has been in the form of small particulate wearing, e.g., alumina oxide abrasive, or indentation resistance of the coating to an external probe, e.g., a nanoindentation device. The subsequent damage imparted to the coating has generally been analyzed by the amount of coating mass lost in the wear event or through a ratio of optical reflectance of the damaged area to the undamaged surface. In this paper, we attempt to delineate surface damage resistance of several automotive clearcoats through an optical interferometry methodology developed to measure volume and depth of damage incurred with small particle alumina oxide erodents in a simulated wear environment.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-1277
Jonathan Cole, Martin Passmore, Eddie Rice
The established method of clearing a misted car windshield or of maintaining a clear view under misting conditions is through the application of an air supply via jet outlets in the instrument panel. The ability of such arrangements to perform adequately is a function of the prevailing environmental conditions, the vehicle speed, the condition of the demist air source and the geometry and arrangement of the jet outlets. This paper presents experimental data obtained in a purpose built environmental chamber designed to accommodate simple rectangular jets impinging on a misted glass surface. The facility consists of three conditioned air sources applied to a test chamber designed to represent the external, internal and demist air flows. Mist conditions on the glass surface are determined using a novel technique employing a CCD camera acquiring grey scale images which are digitally analysed to generate mist detection, grading and clearing contour data.
1999-09-28
Technical Paper
1999-01-3179
Russell Bloomfield, David Crossman, Ali Raeissi
This paper will discuss the analysis of a high-heat, unfilled polyetherimide (PEI) thermoplastic in a complex reflector application with conventional aim (bubble-vial) beam pattern. The advantages and disadvantages of using PEI thermoplastic vs. bulk molding compound (BMC) in a complex reflector will be presented. Design features, testing methodology, and processing techniques for the use of PEI in such applications will also be highlighted.
1999-09-28
Technical Paper
1999-01-3154
Aashir Patel, Daniela Olejnik, Gary Licciardi, Jeff Lippy
Pressures to increase the recyclable and recycled content of passenger vehicles are accelerating. In Europe, there is interest in eliminating halogenated polymers. Globally, more and more concern is focused on materials and methods that are ecologically friendly. Automakers and their suppliers are being encouraged to design and assemble components in new ways to facilitate separation, identification, and resource recovery at the end of the vehicle’s useful life - something that is not only good for the environment, but also the bottom line. One area of the vehicle that has proved challenging for applying such design for disassembly and recycling (DFD/R) principles has been the interior, owing to the sheer number of materials used there, and the great number of laminate structures that make disassembly nearly impossible. A good example is a door panel inner, which typically consists of a rigid plastic substrate, a foam pad, and a vinyl, leather, or cloth covering.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0577
Christopher J. Seeton, David R. Henderson, Derryl C. Wright, John Meyer, William Abate
Environmental concerns have spawned renewed interest in naturally occurring refrigerants such as carbon dioxide. CO2 has attractive features such as high enthalpy of evaporation and low cost compared to halocarbons. However, the vapor pressure of CO2 is high at temperatures normally encountered in refrigeration and air conditioning systems when compared to traditional and alternative refrigerants such as CFC-12 and HFC-134a. Major research efforts are underway to investigate the transcritical CO2 cycle, in which a gas cooler instead of a condenser accomplishes heat rejection to ambient, since carbon dioxide in this cycle is above the critical point. The vapor pressure in the gas cooler may exceed 120 bar (1,740 lb/in2). In this paper a reduced pressure carbon dioxide system is revisited1, 2. The working fluid is a mixture of CO2 and a non-volatile liquid, referred to as a co-fluid, in which CO2 is highly soluble and readily absorbed and desorbed.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0578
George Mozurkewich, Russell D. Roberts, Michael L. Greenfield, William F. Schneider, John J. Meyer, David C. Zietlow, Leonard I. Stiel
A low-pressure CO2-based climate-control system has the environmental benefits of CO2 refrigerant but avoids the extremely high pressures of the transcritical CO2 cycle. In the new cycle, a liquid “cofluid” is circulated in tandem with the CO2, with absorption and desorption of CO2 from solution replacing condensation/gas cooling and evaporation of pure CO2. This work compares the theoretical performance of the cycle using two candidate cofluids: N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone and acetone. The optimal coefficient of performance (COP) and refrigeration capacity are discussed in terms of characteristics of the CO2-cofluid mixture. Thermodynamic functions are determined either from an activity coefficient model or using the Soave equation of state, with close agreement between the two approaches. Reductions in COP due to nonideal compressor and heat exchangers are also estimated.
1999-05-10
Technical Paper
1999-01-1640
Mohammad Usman, Michael J. Garrett, Ralf Poggenborg
Plastics manufacturing technology is rapidly changing. The use of process simulation to increase competitiveness has proliferated. Visteon Automotive Systems is committed to developing competent workforce and niche capabilities in plastics processing simulation. In this paper the current capabilities and future development plan for plastic process simulation are discussed. An integrated concurrent engineering process has been developed and implemented to deliver high quality robust plastics automotive products and systems. This paper highlights the technological advancements achieved by Visteon in the field of analytical simulation of common manufacturing processes. In addition, future development initiatives towards the technical competency in plastics manufacturing simulation are discussed throughout the manuscript.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0692
Keith Kauffmann, Mansour Mirdamadi, Peter Cate, Mark Turner, Bob Turner, Mike Sammut, Chris Arundel, Jeff Laya
In a joint effort between Ford Motor Company, Visteon Automotive Systems, Textron Automotive Company, and Dow Automotive the 1999 Mercury Cougar instrument panel (IP) was designed and engineered to reduce the weight and overall cost of the IP system. The original IP architecture changed from a traditional design that relied heavily upon the steel structure to absorb and dissipate unbelted occupant energy during frontal collisions to a hybrid design that utilizes both plastic and steel to manage energy. This design approach further reduced IP system weight by 1.88 Kg and yielded significant system cost savings. The hybrid instrument panel architecture in the Cougar utilizes a steel cross car beam coupled to steel energy absorbing brackets and a ductile thermoplastic substrate. The glove box assembly and the driver knee bolster are double shell injection molded structures that incorporate molded-in ribs for added stiffness.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0693
Richard Byrd, Edward L. Peterson
Many engineers today use large, powerful multi-purpose test systems to do squeak & rattle testing of modules and subsystems such as Instrument Panels, Consoles and Seat Assemblies. Such test systems include Multi-Axis Hydraulic Shaker Tables and Electrodynamic Vibration Systems with large head expanders and rigid (or at least stiff) fixtures. These test systems have been successful when used for squeak & rattle test programs, have been validated as approved test methods, and have become the standards of comparison in many labs today. They are, however, expensive and throughput can be limited due to the time needed to unbolt, unload, handle, load, and re-bolt a test item at its many attachment points on the rigid fixture. Furthermore, the capital cost of these Legacy systems can be prohibitive, especially for the smaller supplier, who is being compelled to perform squeak & rattle testing on the products they supply to their customers, the vehicle manufacturers and Tier 1 suppliers.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0163
Bob Knoell, Rick Adams, Patrick McCluskey
The automotive electronics market has seen and will continue to see unimpeded growth due to the substitution of mechanical and electromechanical devices with electrical devices wherever feasible for increased reliability. In addition, automakers are increasingly looking to incorporate advanced electronics technology into their vehicles to satisfy customer demands for more and innovative features. Examples of this are the use of global positioning system (GPS) for directions and roadside assistance and increased integration of the engine and powertrain to provide smoother, more fuel-efficient operation. Despite this growth, however, the automotive electronics market continues to shrink as a percentage of the total market due to the phenomenal growth of the computer and telecommunications markets.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-1205
Rose A. Ryntz, Dennis J. Mihora
Damage to painted automotive plastics induced by Hertzian contact stresses continues to plague the material engineer involved in the design and selection of fascias, bumpers, body-side moldings, and the like. Studies conducted to determine the root cause of such failures have focused on the effects of paint and the role of friction in the compressive, tensile and shear failure of painted thermoplastic olefins (TPOs). The study described herein probes the effects of paint type on the compressive, tensile and shear damage resistance of painted TPO substrates. Coating variations, e.g., adhesion promoter and topcoat type, and their effect on damage type and damage sensitivity will be described. The apparatus utilized to impart the damage, SLIDO, and the variables studied affecting the damage, e.g., acceleration, velocity, temperature, and loading pressure, are also discussed.
2001-03-05
Technical Paper
2001-01-1140
Phil Ogren, Ganesh Padiyar, Tim Parkinson, Michael Rabideau, James F. Smithson
The drive to reduce weight, simplify assembly, and cut total system cost in today's vehicles is relentless. Replacing metal systems with thermoplastics has been of considerable interest in the engineering community. The current generations of engineering thermoplastic resins are enabling the use of plastic systems in demanding underhood applications. Technical data and discussion regarding the materials, design, molding, and assembly of lightweight composite throttle bodies will be presented in this paper. Comparisons with machined aluminum throttle housings are drawn to establish a baseline with the throttle body housing component that is most common in production today. Design flexibility and process simplification are some of the approaches highlighted. Much of the technical information provided in the paper applies to both cable driven mechanical throttle bodies as well as electronic throttle bodies under development.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0868
Hans O. Spauschus, David R. Henderson, Christopher J. Seeton, Derryl C. Wright, David C. Zietlow, Gary D. Bramos, William Abate
Environmental concerns have spawned renewed interest in naturally occurring refrigerants such as carbon dioxide. CO2 has attractive features such as high enthalpy of evaporation and low cost compared to halocarbons. However, the vapor pressure of CO2 is high at temperatures normally encountered in refrigeration and air conditioning systems when compared to traditional and alternative refrigerants such as CFC-12 and HFC-134a. Major research efforts are underway to investigate the transcritical CO2 cycle, in which a gas cooler instead of a condenser accomplishes heat rejection to ambient, since carbon dioxide under these conditions is above the critical point. The vapor pressure in the gas cooler may exceed 120 bar (1,740 lb/in2). In this paper a reduced pressure carbon dioxide system is reported (Ref 1). Two companion papers will address properties of working fluids (Ref 2) and thermodynamic and cycle models (Ref 3) for the low pressure carbon dioxide cycle.
Viewing 1 to 14 of 14

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