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Viewing 1 to 23 of 23
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1773
Rahul Rajagopalan, Eric Pierre, AbdulNour Ramez
Evaporators for automotive air-conditioning systems are being coated externally to improve corrosion resistance, water drainage, and reduce potential odor concerns. The coating durability and efficiency in achieving its corrosion resistance depends on the coating uniformity and adhesion characteristics. Good coating adhesion on aluminum surface can be achieved after freeing the surface from the oxide and flux residues. Evaporators manufactured by the Controlled Atmosphere Brazing (CAB) process have flux residue remaining on the surface, the presence of which interferes with the coating process and also affects the performance of coated components. A methodology to quantify the effect of high Nocolok flux residue on heat exchanger coating uniformity has been presented.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1516
Hong Su, David Steinert, Kevin Egle, Brian Weipert
Plastic air induction system (AIS) has been widely used in vehicle powertrain applications for reduced weight, cost, and improved engine performance. Physical design validation (DV) tests of an AIS, as to meet durability and reliability requirements, are usually conducted by employing the frequency domain vibration tests, either sine sweep or random vibration excitations, with a temperature cycling range typically from -40°C to 120°C. It is well known that under high vibration loading and large temperature range, the plastic components of the AIS demonstrate much higher nonlinear response behaviors as compared with metal products. In order to implement a virtual test for plastic AIS products, a practical procedure to model a nonlinear system and to simulate the frequency response of the system, is crucial. The challenge is to model the plastic AIS assembly as a function of loads and temperatures, and to evaluate the dynamic response and fatigue life in frequency domain as well.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1255
Yuejun E. Lee, Sree Sreedhar, D. Marla, C. Pawlicki
Up to date, computer aided engineering (CAE) has been used in improvement of design quality and reduction of cost and delivery time. Although it has been widely accepted as a standard product development tool by the engineering community, CAE still faces many challenges in improving simulation process efficiency through process integration and automation, and simulation accuracy by analytical model/physical testing correlation. CAE engineers are constantly improving the accuracy of their analytical models through test correlation to deliver higher confidence for their analysis result. Although laboratory testing has provided an effective way to accelerate product development, analytical simulation of the lab test has been used frequently to further reduce the development cost and time throughout many industries. This paper presents a case study of CAE correlation of a finite element (FE) model of an automotive beam axle assembly in a laboratory test environment.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1209
Hong Su, David Moenssen, Chris Shaw, John Kostun
Virtual design validation of an air induction system (AIS) requires a proper finite element (FE) assembly model for various simulation based design tasks. The effect of the urethane air filter seal within an AIS assembly, however, still poses a technical challenge to the modeling of structural dynamic behaviors of the AIS product. In this paper, a filter seal model and its modeling approach for AIS assemblies are introduced, by utilizing the feature finite elements and empiric test data. A bushing element is used to model the unique nonlinear stiffness and damping properties of the urethane seal, as a function of seal orientation, preloading, temperature and excitation frequency, which are quantified based on the test data and empiric formula. Point mobility is used to character dynamic behaviors of an AIS structure under given loadings, as a transfer function in frequency domain.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0729
Hong Su
A test load specification is required to validate an automotive product to meet the durability and design life requirements. Traditionally in the automotive industry, load specifications for design validation tests are directly given by OEMs, which are generally developed from an envelop of generic customer usage profiles and are, in most cases, over-specified. In recent years, however, there are many occasions that a proposed load specification for a particular product is requested. The particular test load specification for a particular product is generated based on the measured load data at its mounting location on the given type of vehicles, which contains more realistic time domain load levels and associated frequency contents. The measured time domain load is then processed to frequency domain test load data by using the fast Fourier transform and damage equivalent techniques.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1483
Michael Keranen, Kumar Kulkarni, Jeff Stasevich, Ravi Thyagarajan
Interior compartment doors are required by Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 201, to stay closed during physical head impact testing, and when subjected to specific inertia loads. This paper defines interior compartment doors, and shows examples of several different latches designed to keep these doors closed. It also explores the details of the requirements that interior compartment doors and their latches must meet, including differing requirements from automobile manufacturers. It then shows the conventional static method a supplier uses to analyze a latch and door system. And, since static calculations can't always capture the complexities of a dynamic event, this paper also presents a case study of one particular latch and door system showing a way to simulate the forces experienced by a latch. The dynamic simulation is done using Finite Element Analysis and instrumentation of actual hardware in physical tests.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1482
Hong Su, Ravi Thyagarajan, Joel Brown
Visteon has developed a CAE procedure to qualify instrument panel (IP) products under the vehicle key life test environments, by employing a set of CAE simulation and durability techniques. The virtual key life test method simulates the same structural configuration and the proving ground road loads as in the physical test. A representative dynamic road load profile model is constructed based on the vehicle proving ground field data. The dynamic stress simulation is realized by employing the finite element transient analysis. The durability evaluation is based on the dynamic stress results and the material fatigue properties of each component. The procedure has helped the IP engineering team to identify and correct potential durability problems at earlier design stage without a prototype. It has shown that the CAE virtual key life test procedure provides a way to speed up IP product development, to minimize prototypes and costs.
2003-11-18
Technical Paper
2003-01-3565
Claudio Alexander Vossen, Wagner Luis Pompeo, Wander J.B. Pereira
In Brazil the market for plastic parts molds, in last few years had become very competitive, with several Vehicle Operations and a big number of a different models, and with today total market volume it means low volumes productions for each model. This market demands for good toolshops and at the same time a big pressure to reduce investments, one of the most important. Plastic components usage in the car, is increasing overtime, with new applications for Exterior, interior and powertrain, requiring new technologies for Injection molding processing and making molds to be more complex. The development of plastic parts in Brazil has its own characteristics, strengths and weaknesses. In fact a big and heterogeneous market. This paper intends to present an analysis of development of plastic parts in Brazil, considering the development of mold tooling locally, focusing the automotive market.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1139
Neville J. Bugli, Gregory S. Green
Engine air filtration technologies currently used in air induction systems typically utilize pleated paper or felt type air filters. These air filter designs have been used for many years in panels, cylindrical or round (pancake type) type air cleaners. Pleated air filters are specifically designed to be serviceable and hence their performance is inherently limited by vehicle under-hood packaging and manufacturing constraints. Due to these constraints, majority of air cleaner designs are not optimized for engine filtration and air flow management under the hood. Studies show that use of low performing serviceable aftermarket air filters significantly affect the performance and durability of engine air cleaners [9]. High mileage studies confirm that engine durability, service issues, warranty field returns and customer satisfaction was affected by use of aftermarket filter brands.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0782
Gary Leevy, Khoa Cao
The fundamentals of multi-leaf spring design as determined through beam theory offers a general perspective on how finite element analysis works. Additionally, the fundamentals of combining dissimilar materials require a basic knowledge of how the combined equivalent modulus affects the overall stiffness characteristics of multi-leaf design. By capturing these basic fundamentals into finite element modeling, an analysis of a steel-composite multi-leaf contact model relative to an idealized steel-composite multi-leaf model shows the importance of contact modeling. The results demonstrate the important differences between an idealized non-contact model relative to a complete contact model.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1429
Scott A. Schaffer, Anthony Arruda, James Bielicki, Neville Bugli
As OEMs race to build their sales fleets to meet ever more stringent California Air Resources Board (CARB) mobile source evaporative emissions requirements, new technologies are emerging to control pollution. Evaporative emissions emanating from sources up-stream in the induction flow and venting through the ducts of the engine air induction system (EIS) need to be controlled in order classify a salable vehicle as a Partial Zero Emissions Vehicle (PZEV) in the state of California. As other states explore adopting California's pollution control standards, demand for emissions control measures in the induction system is expected to increase. This paper documents some of the considerations of designing an adsorbent evaporative emissions device in to a 2007 production passenger car for the North American and Asian markets.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-0172
John J. Meyer
As global automobile manufacturers prepare for the phase-out of R134a in Europe, they must address the issue of using the new refrigerant for European sales only or launching the product worldwide. Several factors play into this decision, including cost, service, risk, customer satisfaction, capacity, efficiency, etc. This research effort addresses the minimal vehicle-level hardware differences necessary to provide a European solution of R1234yf while continuing to install R134a into vehicles for the rest of the world. It is anticipated that the same compressor, lubricant and condenser; most fluid transport lines; and in most cases the evaporator can be common between the two systems.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1221
Mike Keranen, Srikanth Krishnaraj, Kumar Kulkarni, Li Lu, Ravi Thyagarajan, Velayudham Ganesan
Occupant head impact simulations on automotive instrument panels (IP) are routinely performed as part of an integrated design process during the course of IP development. Based on the requirements (F/CMVSS, ECE), head impact zones on the IP are first established, which are then used to determine the various “hit” locations to be tested/analyzed. Once critical impact locations are identified, CAE simulations performed which is a repetitive process that involves computing impact angles, positioning the rigid head form with an assigned initial velocity and defining suitable contacts within the finite element model. A commercially available CAE process automation tool was used to automate these steps and generate a head impact simulation model. Once the input model is checked for errors by the automated process, it can be submitted to a solver without any user intervention for analysis and report generation.
2003-03-03
Technical Paper
2003-01-0662
Xiaoming Bian, Houliang Li, Joseph Lanzesira
Application of Ultra Thin Wall (UTW) ceramic substrates in the catalytic converter system requires the canner and component manufacturers to better understand the root cause and physics behind substrate breakage during the canning process. For this purpose, a ceramic substrate strength study for shoebox design has been conducted within Visteon Corporation. Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machined top and bottom fixtures, with identical inner surfaces as shoebox converter upper and lower shells, were used to crush mat wrapped substrates. Thin film pressure sensor technology enables the recording of substrate surface pressure during the compression process. Shell rib, washcoat, canning speed and cell density effects on substrate failure have been experimentally investigated. The development of a mathematical model helps to identify a better indicator to evaluate the substrate strength in the canning process and establish the strength for uncoated & coated substrates.
2003-03-03
Technical Paper
2003-01-1209
Hong Su, Chuck Dunn, Alex Krajcirovic
Visteon has developed a CAE procedure to qualify plastic door trim assemblies under the vehicle door slam Key Life Test (KLT) environments. The CAE Virtual Door Slam Test (VDST) procedure simulates the environment of a whole door structural assembly, as a hinged in-vehicle door slam configuration. It predicts the durability life of a plastic door trim sub-assembly, in terms of the number of slam cycles, based on the simulated stresses and plastic material fatigue damage model, at each critical location. The basic theory, FEA methods and techniques employed by the VDST procedure are briefly described in this paper. Door trim project examples are presented to illustrate the practical applications and their results, as well as the correlation with the physical door slam KLTs.
2003-05-05
Technical Paper
2003-01-1448
Kexin Hu, Chul Lee, Emile Homsi, David Moenssen
Reliable prediction of the radiated noise due to the air pressure pulsation inside air-intake manifolds (AIM) is of significant interest in the automotive industry. A practical methodology to model plastic AIMs and a prediction process to compute the radiated noise are presented in this paper. The measured pressure at the engine inlet valve of an AIM is applied as excitation on an acoustic boundary element model of the AIM in order to perform a frequency response analysis. The measured air pressure pulsation is obtained in the crank-angle domain. This pressure is read into MATLAB and transformed into the frequency domain using the fast Fourier transform. The normal modes of the structure are computed in ABAQUS and a coupled analysis in SYSNOISE is launched to couple the boundary element model and the finite element model of the structure. The computed surface vibration constitutes the excitation for an acoustic uncoupled boundary element analysis.
2003-03-03
Technical Paper
2003-01-1168
Srikanth Krishnaraj, Kumar B. Kulkarni, Vikram Narayanasamy, Ravi Thyagarajan
Occupant knee impact simulations are performed in the automotive industry as an integrated design process during the course of instrument panel (IP) development. All major automakers have different categories of dynamic testing methods as part of their design process in validating their designs against the FMVSS 208 requirement. This has given rise to a corresponding number of knee impact simulations performed at various stages of product development. This paper investigates the advantages and disadvantages of various types of these knee impact simulations. Only the knee load requirement portion of the FMVSS208 is considered in this paper.
2003-03-03
Technical Paper
2003-01-1175
Michael Keranen, James Hanford
In today's global economy, the automotive design engineer's responsibilities are made more complex by the differences between regulatory requirements of the various global markets. This paper compares instrument panel head impact requirements of FMVSS 201 with its European counterparts, ECE 21, and EEC/74/60, Interior Fittings. It describes the similarities and differences between these regulations and explains the unique requirements for each market. It then compares processes for development and validation testing in both markets. It also covers related topics like self-certification, witness testing, radii, projections, and interior compartment doors. The cockpit design engineer will gain an understanding of the factors involved in ensuring that their design fully meets the requirements of the subject regulations.
2002-03-04
Technical Paper
2002-01-0310
M. Pavlowski, B. Wichterman, M. Garrett, R. Bondar, S. Gretka
Recycled resins can meet performance requirements on products which were initially designed for virgin materials. Olefinic instrument panel (I/P) scrap is being recycled from the Mazda Tribute and the Ford Escape into glove box bins. As a result, a quality part is being supplied to the customer and Visteon's Saline Plant has realized both increased plant operating efficiencies and landfill cost avoidance. The development process is described including: plant regrind sources, part molding and testing.
2002-03-04
Technical Paper
2002-01-0311
Lisandro Trevino, Esther Sun, Anna Cardenas, Deepak Patel
Traditionally, the passenger airbag door for an instrument panel (I/P) is a separate component assembled to the substrate, where the panel has an opening for the airbag module. The airbag door (usually made of TPE material) arrives to the assembly line from the airbag module supplier to be installed to the I/P. The grain and gloss between the door cover and the I/P class “A” surface must match closely. This paper describes the implementation of the passenger airbag door as an integral part of the instrument panel. This approach provides superior craftsmanship to the vehicle interior system. The I/P area that contains the seamless passenger airbag is weakened from the B-surface.
2002-03-04
Technical Paper
2002-01-0723
Don H. Pham
Composite materials can be used effectively for structural applications where high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios are required. Although the design and analysis techniques for static, buckling and vibration loadings are fairly well established, methodologies for analysis of composite structures under impact loading are still a major research activity. This paper presents a nonlinear finite-element analysis method to analyze a composite structure subjected to axial impact load. The analysis was performed using MSC/DYTRAN FE code while pre and post processing were done using MSC/PATRAN program. In addition, a steel tube of the same geometry was analyzed for comparison purpose.
2002-03-04
Technical Paper
2002-01-0676
Haimian Cai, Mark Bewick
The demand for improved vehicle fuel economy drives the auto engineers to look for opportunities in weight reduction of automotive systems and components. This paper presents inventions on the design and development of a lightweight spindle. In this new product, the spindle body is made from an Al alloy for a substantial weight reduction in comparison to the tradition iron spindle body. The shaft of the spindle is made from high strength steel to meet strength requirements. The design shows the unique feature of the joining area between the spindle body and shaft. The related joining process is applied to produce a strong joint between the two parts made of different materials. The testing results will be presented and discussed.
2001-03-05
Technical Paper
2001-01-3798
Fred Lee, Rose A. Ryntz, Dottie Britz, Jared Summerville
This paper describes the applicability of optical imaging techniques to the analysis of the scratch resistance of automotive interior plastic materials. The evaluation of so-called “finger testing” has traditionally relied upon human vision for detection of the initial scratch position. Commonly performed under uniform and defined illumination conditions, the relative contrast difference signified by whitening on a surface as determined by unaided human vision is a highly variable subjective perception; thus individual inspectors may determine the “whitening” point differently. This paper compares test data obtained from both visual and instrumental evaluation methods and discusses the advantages of optical imaging techniques for surface defect analysis.
Viewing 1 to 23 of 23

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