Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Affiliation:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 47
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1501
Yinhua Zheng
The paper addresses compressor body temperature (crankcase) importance to the vehicle AC system long-term durability. Majority of OEM vehicle test evaluation is to see if AC system can pass compressor discharge temperature and discharge pressure targets. Most OEMs adopt 130°C max compressor discharge temperature and 2350 kpag head pressure as the target. From the field, although some of the compressor failure results from a high compression ratio, and compressor discharge temperature that are caused by the poor front end airflow, etc., high percentage compressor failed systems exhibit not too high compression ratio and compressor discharge temperature, but having the trace of high temperature in the shaft area, gasket area, etc. With introducing more and more variable swash plate compressor applications, OEMs start to see more and more compressor failures that are not related to a high compressor discharge temperature but the trace of high compressor body temperature.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2350
Christopher E. Shaw, David J. Moenssen, William C. Montgomery
Engine air induction noise can play a significant role in the reduction of vehicle interior noise levels and tuning interior sound quality. Given the need to reduce prototyping and testing costs, it is important to gain an understanding of the level and frequency structure of the noise radiating from the open inlet of the air induction system. Engine simulation used independently can predict inlet noise; however, its utility is limited to systems that are largely one-dimensional. Systems that exhibit a three-dimensional nature, such as the wave dynamics in an engine air cleaner, require a more intensive approach. Boundary Element Analysis (BEA) has been demonstrated to be a tool that can be used to predict the frequency response of ducted systems and is particularly useful in highly three-dimensional systems.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3751
Ibrahim Haskara, Guoming Zhu, Chao Daniels, Jim Winkelman
This paper presents a combustion stability index derived from an in-cylinder ionization signal to control the engine maximum EGR limit. Different from the existing approaches that use the ionization signal values to gauge how much EGR was added during the combustion, the proposed method concentrates on using the ionization signal duration and its stochastic properties to evaluate the end result of EGR on combustion stability. When the duration index or indexes are higher than pre-determined values, the EGR limit is set. The dynamometer engine test results have shown promise for closed loop EGR control of spark ignition engines.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1884
Zheng David Lou
A dynamic computer model of automotive air conditioning systems was developed. The model uses simulation software for the coding of 1-D heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid flow, and control valves. The same software is used to model 3-D solid dynamics associated with mechanical mechanisms of the compressor. The dynamics of the entire AC system is thus simulated within the same software environment. The results will show the models potential applications in component and system design, calibration and control.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1773
Rahul Rajagopalan, Eric Pierre, AbdulNour Ramez
Evaporators for automotive air-conditioning systems are being coated externally to improve corrosion resistance, water drainage, and reduce potential odor concerns. The coating durability and efficiency in achieving its corrosion resistance depends on the coating uniformity and adhesion characteristics. Good coating adhesion on aluminum surface can be achieved after freeing the surface from the oxide and flux residues. Evaporators manufactured by the Controlled Atmosphere Brazing (CAB) process have flux residue remaining on the surface, the presence of which interferes with the coating process and also affects the performance of coated components. A methodology to quantify the effect of high Nocolok flux residue on heat exchanger coating uniformity has been presented.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0009
Dennis McDonald
Commonly, a significant event is detected when a normally stable engine parameter (ex. sensor voltage, sensor current, air flow, pedal position, fuel level, tire pressure, engine acceleration, etc.) transiently exceeds a calibrated detection threshold. Many implementations of detection thresholds rely on multi-input lookup tables or functions and are complex and difficult to calibrate. An approach is presented to minimize threshold calibration effort and complexity, while improving detection performance, by dynamically computing thresholds on-line based on current real-time data. Determining engine synchronization without a camshaft position sensor is presented as an illustrative application.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-1041
Xin Liu, Kyoung-Su Im, Yujie Wang, Jin Wang, David L.S. Hung, James R. Winkelman, Mark W. Tate, Alper Ercan, Lucas J. Koerner, Thomas Caswell, Darol Chamberlain, Daniel R. Schuette, Hugh Philipp, Detlef M. Smilgies, Sol M. Gruner
A low-pressure direct injection fuel system for spark ignition direct injection engines has been developed, in which a high-turbulence nozzle technology was employed to achieve fine fuel droplet size at a low injection pressure around 2 MPa. It is particularly important to study spray characteristics in the near-nozzle region due to the immediate liquid breakup at the nozzle exit. By using an ultrafast x-ray area detector and intense synchrotron x-ray beams, the interior structure and dynamics of the direct injection gasoline sprays from a multi-orifice turbulence-assisted nozzle were elucidated for the first time in a highly quantitative manner with μs-temporal resolution. Revealed by a newly developed, ultrafast computed x-microtomography technique, many detailed features associated with the transient liquid flows are readily observable in the reconstructed spray.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0607
Gang Wu
Knock correction is the spark angle retard applied to the optimum ignition timing to eliminate knock. In adaptive knock control, this amount of spark retard at an operating point (i.e. Speed, load) is stored in a speed/load characteristic map. It will be reused when the engine is operated in this range once more. In this paper, a method to learn the knock correction values into a speed/load characteristic map is described. This method proportionally distributes the knock correction into the characteristic map according to the distance between the speed/load of these nodes and the current operating point. The distributed knock correction value is filtered and accumulated in its adjacent nodes. Simulation examples demonstrate that the retrieved values from the map by the proposed method are smoother than those produced by the method of [2][3]. The mathematical basis for this method is developed. The one and two independent variable cases are illustrated.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0253
Hong Su
In this paper, an analytical procedure for prediction of shell radiated noise of air induction systems (AIS) due to engine acoustic excitation, without a prototype and physical measurement, is presented. A set of modeling and simulation techniques are introduced to address the challenges to the analytical radiated noise prediction of AIS products. A filter seal model is developed to simulate the unique nonlinear stiffness and damping properties of air cleaner boxes. A finite element model (FEM) of the AIS assembly is established by incorporating the AIS structure, the proposed filter seal model and its acoustic cavity model. The coupled acoustic-structural FEM of the AIS assembly is then employed to compute the velocity frequency response of the AIS structure with respect to the air-borne acoustic excitations.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3317
Guoming G. Zhu, David L. S. Hung, Jim Winkelman
It is well-known that in-cylinder ionization signals can be used for detecting combustion characteristics of IC (Internal Combustion) engines. For example, engine misfire, incomplete combustion (or partial-burn), knock, MBT (Minimum spark advance for Best Torque) timing and combustion stability can be detected using in-cylinder ionization signals. In addition, closed loop combustion spark timing control strategies have been developed to control engine MBT timing and to manage spark timing advance (knock) and retard (incomplete combustion) limits. In-cylinder ionization signals can also be used for closed loop control of maximum equivalence ratio (lean limit) at a desired combustion stability level. Up to now, most of the ionization applications have been for PFI (Port Fuel Injection) engines. This paper presents ionization detection for gasoline Direct Injection (DI) engines.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1506
Chris Swales, Christoph Capellmann, Matt Crompton, Marcus Matthes
Customer clinics and surveys have revealed the increased importance to the customer of good defrost and demist performance in their vehicle. Achieving this level of performance, within the time and cost constraints of a modern vehicle development program, places increased reliance on computational (CAE) techniques. However, this paper describes how the optimum development process should be to combine this reliance upon CAE methods with a newly developed experimental technique. This new laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) based methodology is employed at all stages of the development process and complements the CAE techniques perfectly. The end result is optimized airflow management within the vehicle cabin – essential if good defrost and demist performance is to be achieved in a vehicle.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1379
John Meyer, George Yang, Evangelos Papoulis
As powertrains continue to get more efficient, less waste heat is available for warming the passenger compartment. Although several supplemental heating devices are currently on the market, including electric heaters, viscous heaters, and fuel operated heaters, they each have shortcomings related to cost, capacity, efficiency, and/or environmental concerns[1]. In an attempt to provide superior time-to-comfort in a cost, weight, package efficient, and environmentally friendly manner, an R134a heat pump (HP) system was developed. Several technical issues were overcome while developing this system. Production vehicles have been retrofitted to incorporate the R134a heat pump system and tested in a climatic wind tunnel. Test results for a -18°C warm-up test were compared to baseline data, showing significant improvements in average discharge air and breath level temperatures.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-3266
Guoming G. Zhu, Chao F. Daniels, James Winkelman
MBT timing for an internal combustion engine is also called minimum spark timing for best torque or the spark timing for maximum brake torque. Unless engine spark timing is limited by engine knock or emission requirements at a certain operational condition, there exists an MBT timing that yields the maximum work for a given air-to-fuel mixture. Traditionally, MBT timing for a particular engine is determined by conducting a spark sweep process that requires a substantial amount of time to obtain an MBT calibration. Recently, on-line MBT timing detection schemes have been proposed based upon cylinder pressure or ionization signals using peak cylinder pressure location, 50 percent fuel mass fraction burn location, pressure ratio, and so on. Because these criteria are solely based upon data correlation and observation, both of them may change at different engine operational conditions. Therefore, calibration is still required for each MBT detection scheme.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1385
James Link, Ken Helberg, Karim Nasr
There are many opportunities in a current automotive HVAC case for improved performance, and cost savings. Based on these opportunities, a new HVAC case design has been developed. This new design is smaller and lighter than current cases while meeting many of the performance requirements. The case also features a unique plenum design for air distribution to the three modes, panel, floor, and defrost. The results of simulation and laboratory testing confirmed the concept of the new HVAC design.
2004-10-25
Technical Paper
2004-01-2977
Ibrahim Haskara, Guoming G. Zhu, Jim Winkelman
Internal combustion engines are designed to maximize power subject to meeting exhaust emission requirements and minimizing fuel consumption. However, the usable range of ignition timing is often limited by knock in the advance direction and by combustion instability (partial burn and misfire) in the retard direction. This paper details a retard limit management system utilizing ionization signals in order to maintain the desired combustion quality and prevent the occurrence of misfire without using fixed limits. In-cylinder ionization signals are processed to derive a metric for combustion quality and closeness of combustion to partial burn/misfire limit, which is used to provide a limiting value for the baseline ignition timing in the retard direction. For normal operations, this assures that the combustion variability is kept within an acceptable range.
2004-10-25
Technical Paper
2004-01-2976
Guoming G. Zhu, Chao F. Daniels, Jim Winkelman
Maximum Brake Torque (MBT) timing for an internal combustion engine is the minimum advance of spark timing for best torque. Traditionally, MBT timing is an open loop feedforward control whose values are experimentally determined by conducting spark sweeps at different speed, load points and at different environmental operating conditions. Almost every calibration point needs a spark sweep to see if the engine can be operated at the MBT timing condition. If not, a certain degree of safety margin is needed to avoid pre-ignition or knock during engine operation. Open-loop spark mapping usually requires a tremendous amount of effort and time to achieve a satisfactory calibration. This paper shows that MBT timing can be achieved by regulating a composite feedback measure derived from the in-cylinder ionization signal referenced to a top dead center crank angle position. A PI (proportional and integral) controller is used to illustrate closed-loop control of MBT timing.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-3149
Chao F. Daniels, Guoming G. Zhu, James Winkelman
Internal combustion engines are designed to maximize power subject to meeting exhaust emission requirements and minimizing fuel consumption. Maximizing engine power and fuel economy is limited by engine knock for a given air-to-fuel charge. Therefore, the ability to detect engine knock and run the engine at its knock limit is a key for the best power and fuel economy. This paper shows inaudible knock detection ability using in-cylinder ionization signals over the entire engine speed and load map. This is especially important at high engine speed and high EGR rates. The knock detection ability is compared between three sensors: production knock (accelerometer) sensor, in-cylinder pressure and ionization sensors. The test data shows that the ionization signals can be used to detect inaudible engine knock while the conventional knock sensor cannot under some engine operational conditions.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1139
Neville J. Bugli, Gregory S. Green
Engine air filtration technologies currently used in air induction systems typically utilize pleated paper or felt type air filters. These air filter designs have been used for many years in panels, cylindrical or round (pancake type) type air cleaners. Pleated air filters are specifically designed to be serviceable and hence their performance is inherently limited by vehicle under-hood packaging and manufacturing constraints. Due to these constraints, majority of air cleaner designs are not optimized for engine filtration and air flow management under the hood. Studies show that use of low performing serviceable aftermarket air filters significantly affect the performance and durability of engine air cleaners [9]. High mileage studies confirm that engine durability, service issues, warranty field returns and customer satisfaction was affected by use of aftermarket filter brands.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1071
Hong Su, James Kempf, Bill Montgomery, Ryan Grimes
A coupled vibration and pressure loading procedure has been developed to perform a CAE virtual test for engine air intake manifolds. The CAE virtual test simulates the same physical test configuration and environments, such as the base acceleration vibration excitation and pressure pulsation loads, as well as temperature conditions, for design validation (DV) test of air intake manifolds. The original vibration and pressure load data, measured with respect to the engine speed rpm, are first converted to their respective vibration and pressure power spectrum density (PSD) profiles in frequency domain, based on the duty cycle specification. The final accelerated vibration excitation and pressure PSD load profiles for design validation are derived based on the key life test (KLT) duration and reliability requirements, using the equivalent fatigue damage technique.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1149
Joe Z. Li, Chris Treusch, Benoît Honel, Stéphane Neyrat
In today's search for a better fuel economy and lower emissions, it is essential to precisely control the injected fuel quantity, as demanded by the engine load, into each of the engine cylinders. In fuel injection systems, the pressure pulsations due to the rapid opening and closing of the injectors can cause uneven injected fuel amounts between cylinders. In order to develop effective techniques to reduce these pressure pulsations, it is crucial to have a good understanding of the dynamic characteristics of such fuel injection systems. This paper presents the benefits of using simulation as a tool to analyze the dynamic behaviors of a V8 gasoline injection system. The fuel system modeling, based on a one-dimensional (1D) lumped parameter approach, has been developed in the AMESim® environment. The comparison between the simulation results and the experimental data shows good agreement in fluid transient characteristics for both time and frequency domains.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0048
Dennis McDonald
Engine position synchronous control of fuel injection and spark ignition at engine start can reduce regulated emissions, and improve start quality. Synchronous fuel and ignition control requires full 720° engine position information. Emissions and start quality benefits are gained if engine position is available at key-on before initial engine rotation. Typical engine position sensor sets require substantial engine rotation before engine position is initialized. Tracking engine stop position, for use on the next start, eliminates the initial engine angular travel required for synchronization. The previous stop position of the engine is stored in non-volatile memory, giving engine position immediately at start. This approach is applicable for systems in which the engine controller remains powered for some time after key-off. As the engine stops, direction reversals are common.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0018
Guoming G. Zhu, Ibrahim Haskara, Jim Winkelman
Spark timing of an Internal Combustion (IC) engine is often limited by engine knock in the advanced direction. The ability to operate the engine at its advanced (borderline knock) spark limit is the key for improving output power and fuel economy. Due to combustion cycle-to-cycle variations, IC engine combustion behaves similar to a random process and so does the engine performance criteria, such as IMEP (Indicated Mean Effective Pressure), and knock intensity. The combustion stability measure COVariance of IMEP assumes the IMEP is a random process. Presently, the spark limit control of IC engines is deterministic in nature. The controller does not utilize any stochastic information associated with control parameters such as knock intensity for borderline spark limit control. This paper proposes a stochastic limit control strategy for borderline knock control. It also develops a simple stochastic model for evaluating the proposed stochastic controller.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0524
Chang Yang
This paper describes two electronic throttle controllers of Visteon Corporation with one already in production and the other currently under development. Analysis and tuning of the two controllers are described. The general structure of the controllers consists of a reference shaping subsystem and a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative(PID) controller supplemented with additional terms that deal with the nonlinearility of the electronic throttle body. Due to a friction cancellation term in the controller that minimizes the nonlinearity of the system, linear system analysis techniques are applied. The transfer functions of the electronic throttle body at six different operating conditions are derived. Analysis of the closed-loop dynamics is performed based on the plant and the controller transfer-functions. Controller fine-tuning is performed using frequency response techniques, MATLAB simulations and testing on the actual system.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0565
Paul Turnbull, John Kuo, Roy Schultz, Bruce Turner
A twenty-five kilowatt (peak power for one minute), permanent magnet electric machine for a hybrid electric vehicle application was designed and tested. The electric machine is located in the clutch housing of an automatically shifted manual transmission and is subjected to 120 °C continuous ambient temperatures. The package constraints and duty cycle requirements resulted in an extremely challenging thermal design for an electric machine. The losses in the machine were predicted using models based on first principles and the heat transfer in the machine was modeled using computational fluid dynamics. The simulations were compared to test results over a variety of operating conditions and the results were used to validate the models. Parametric studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of potting materials and cooling topologies.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0276
Mark Hsu, Maher El-Jaroudi, Eric Bender
The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate our success in taking advantage of model-based development tools and auto-code technology to accelerate the typical life cycle development of powertrain software. In particular, we applied the technology as a clean sheet approach to Visteon's third generation Electronic Throttle Control system. In the process of applying model-based development and 100% auto-code, we identified various pitfalls and created solutions to overcome the gap between technology and development process during each phase of the entire software development life cycle. We will share our lessons learned during the requirement, design, implementation, and validation stages.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-1068
David L.S. Hung, David L. Harrington, Anand H. Gandhi, Lee E. Markle, Scott E. Parrish, Joseph S. Shakal, Hamid Sayar, Steven D. Cummings, Jason L. Kramer
With increasingly stringent emissions regulations and concurrent requirements for enhanced engine thermal efficiency, a comprehensive characterization of the automotive gasoline fuel spray has become essential. The acquisition of accurate and repeatable spray data is even more critical when a combustion strategy such as gasoline direct injection is to be utilized. Without industry-wide standardization of testing procedures, large variablilities have been experienced in attempts to verify the claimed spray performance values for the Sauter mean diameter, Dv90, tip penetration and cone angle of many types of fuel sprays. A new SAE Recommended Practice document, J2715, has been developed by the SAE Gasoline Fuel Injection Standards Committee (GFISC) and is now available for the measurement and characterization of the fuel sprays from both gasoline direct injection and port fuel injection injectors.
2008-06-23
Technical Paper
2008-01-1767
Guoming Zhu, Tom Stuecken, Harold Schock, Xiaojian Yang, David L. S. Hung, Andrew Fedewa
The requirement of reduced emissions and improved fuel economy led the introduction of direct-injection (DI) spark-ignited (SI) engines. Dual-fuel injection system (direct-injection and port-fuel-injection (PFI)) was also used to improve engine performance at high load and speed. Ethanol is one of the several alternative transportation fuels considered for replacing fossil fuels such as gasoline and diesel. Ethanol offers high octane quality but with lower energy density than fossil fuels. This paper presents the combustion characteristics of a single cylinder dual-fuel injection SI engine with the following fueling cases: a) gasoline for PFI and DI, b) PFI gasoline and DI ethanol, and c) PFI ethanol and DI gasoline. For this study, the DI fueling portion varied from 0 to 100 percentage of the total fueling over different engine operational conditions while the engine air-to-fuel ratio remained at a constant level.
2008-09-09
Technical Paper
2008-32-0028
Nicholas M. Danne, David L. S. Hung, Guoming G. Zhu, Jay McKoskey
To obtain the maximum output power and fuel economy from an internal combustion engine, it is often necessary to detect engine knock and operate the engine at its knock limit. This paper presents the ability to detect knock using in-cylinder ionization signals on a large displacement, air-cooled, “V” twin motorcycle engine over the engine operational map. The knock detection ability of three different sensors is compared: production knock (accelerometer) sensor, in-cylinder pressure sensor, and ionization sensor. The test data shows that the ionization sensor is able to detect knock better than the production knock sensor when there is high mechanical noise present in the engine.
2008-09-09
Technical Paper
2008-32-0054
Mahesh Balike, Richard M. Tricoli
This paper gives an overview of a scalable engine management system architecture for motorcycle and other small engine based vehicle applications. The system can accommodate any engine sizes and up to four cylinders. The architecture incorporates advanced functionalities such as oxygen sensing, closed loop fueling, wall-wetting compensation, purge control, start & idle control and deceleration fuel cut-off. Additionally, a number of vehicle-related controls are integrated in the system. Diagnostic and safety related features have also been incorporated with limp-home capability. The software architecture is compatible with different hardware solutions. The system has been implemented in several OEM vehicles around the globe and meets EURO-3 emission requirements.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1431
Neville J. Bugli, Scott Dobert, Scott Flora
Most new passenger vehicles on the road today are equipped with a disposable OEM engine intake filter made of cellulose paper or synthetic non-woven media. Engine intake filters have an expected and recommended service life (by OEMs) of approximately 45K to 75K kilometers under normal driving conditions [ref. 2, 3, 4 & 5]. Majority of air filter element manufacturers do not recommend any type of cleaning to be performed on their OEM products. However, cleaning OEM and aftermarket air filters is common for end-customers in areas such as Asia, Middle East and South America. Vehicle owners in some regions would like to service and clean their own air filter elements in an effort to reduce vehicle operating costs. As a result, a number of OEMs selling passenger vehicles in these regions are requesting their suppliers explore solutions and the effects of whether cleaning air filter elements is appropriate for proper engine operation.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 47

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: