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Viewing 1 to 30 of 90
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0691
Gökhan Tabanoglu
A novel scheduling concept, called switched scheduling, for efficient bandwidth usage in a FlexRay cluster is introduced. It assumes a synchronized FlexRay cluster divided into several branches using an intelligent active star. The concept allows the simultaneous usage of the same timeslot by different nodes as well as the realization of slot multiplexing without changing the FlexRay protocol version 2.1. Furthermore it enables the usage of heterogeneous cycle configurations for each branch while synchronization is still provided for the whole cluster. In addition to the scheduling concept a design approach based on AUTOSAR is presented to enable the model-driven development of the resulting schedule which is called multidimensional schedule.
2004-06-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1918
G. Suck, J. Jakobs, S. Nicklitzsch, T. Lee, W. G. Bessler, M. Hofmann, F. Zimmermann, C. Schulz
In direct-injection gasoline (GDI) engines with charge stratification, minimizing engine-out nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission is crucial since exhaust-gas aftertreatment tolerates only limited amounts of NOx. Reduced NOx production directly lowers the frequency of energy-inefficient catalyst regeneration cycles. In this paper we investigate NO formation in a realistic GDI engine. Quantitative in-cylinder measurements of NO concentrations are carried out via laser-induced fluorescence imaging with excitation of NO (A-X(0,2) band at 248 nm), and subsequent fluorescence detection at 220-240 nm. Engine modifications were kept to a minimum in order to provide results that are representative of practical operating conditions. Optical access via a sapphire ring enabled identical engine geometry as a production line engine. The engine is operated with commercial gasoline (“Super-Plus”, RON 98).
2004-06-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1830
B. Heller, G. Lach, J.D. Baronick, W. Fabinski, M. Moede
For the measurement of NO and NO2 the CLD-analyzer (chemiluminescense detector) has been used for more than twenty-five years. The disadvantage of the CLD is that NO can be measured only. To obtain total NOX (NO+NO2) the exhaust gas sample has to flow through a catalytic converter, which reduces NO2 to NO. The converter has a efficiency between 90 and 100%. For precise NO and NO2 values it is an advantage to analyze NO and NO2 directly. This paper describes a new UV NOX-analyzer for the simultaneous measurement of NO and NO2. Two different configurations, for high and low concentrations, eg. CVS-bag analysis are presented. The performance of the analyzers is documented in comparison to the UV-RAS analyzer with converter for NOX [1] and the conventional CLD-analyzer. The benefits of the new analyzer compared to analyzers equipped with a converter are given in detailed test results.
1999-10-25
Technical Paper
1999-01-3542
Volker Aust, Gerd Zimmermann, Peter-Wolfgang Manz, Werner Hentschel
Crank-angle resolved, gas temperatures are determined in the combustion chamber of a Volkswagen (VW) standard-production, port-injected SI engine. During idle, two different methods are applied: (1) a direct spectroscopic emission-absorption technique at a resonance line of potassium, seeded to the air stream to generate sufficient spectral absorptance (‘colouring’ technique), and (2) a more standard, indirect method in which temperatures are derived from pressure recordings using a two-zone thermodynamic model. Combustion temperatures obtained during idle with both the spectroscopic (1) and ‘two-zone’ (2) methods are in good agreement. In addition, the spectroscopic technique is extended to transient operating conditions where the ‘two-zone’ method is not applicable. Combustion temperatures measured during cold-start and abrupt load alteration are in good agreement with former investigations.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0865
Michael Breuer, Christof Schernus, Robert Böwing, André Kuphal, Stefan Lieske
A uniform flow distribution at converter inlet is one of the fundamental requirements to meet high catalytic efficiency. Commonly used tools for optimization of the inlet flow distribution are flow measurements as well as CFD analysis. This paper puts emphasis on the experimental procedures and results. The interaction of flow measurements and CFD is outlined. The exhaust gas flow is transient, compressible and hot, making in-situ flow measurements very complex. On the other hand, to utilize the advantages of flow testing at steady-state and cold conditions the significance of these results has to be verified first. CFD analysis under different boundary conditions prove that - in a first approach - the flow situation can be regarded as a sequence of successive, steady-state situations. Using the Reynolds analogy a formula for the steady-state, cold test mass flow is derived, taking into account the cylinder displacement and the rated speed.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0857
J. Baronick, B. Heller, G. Lach, B. Ramacher
Sulfur content in gasoline is known to reduce the efficiency of the catalytic converters that are used to reduce pollutants in the exhaust gas of cars. There is some concern that nitrous oxide emissions (N2O) increase when fuel with a high sulfur content is used. The engine out and tailpipe mass emissions of two cars conforming to the California LEV-standard were analyzed. The influence of the fuel sulfur content on the emissions of the regulated and some unregulated pollutants during FTP test cycles was determined. Four fuels covering the range from less than 1 to 330 ppm sulfur content were used. Over that range of fuel sulfur concentration the engine out emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2 ) of both cars increased. Tailpipe emissions of SO2 were only found at fuel sulfur concentrations of 150 and 330 ppm. For both vehicles a correlation between the N2O emissions and the fuel sulfur content was found.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0662
H. Bensler, F. Bühren, E. Samson, L. Vervisch
A 3-dimensional numerical study has been conducted investigating the combustion process in a VW 1.9l TDI Diesel engine. Simulations were performed modeling the spray injection of a 5-hole Diesel injector in a pressure chamber. A graphical methodology was utilized to match the spray resulting from the widely used Discrete Droplet Spray model to pressure chamber spray images. Satisfactory agreement has been obtained regarding the simulated and experimental spray penetration and cone angles. Thereafter, the combustion process in the engine was simulated. Using engine measurements to initialize the combustion chamber conditions, the compression stroke, the spray injection and the combustion simulation was performed. The novel RTZF two-zone flamelet combustion model was used for the combustion simulation and was tested for partial load operating conditions. An objective analysis of the model is presented including the results of a numerical parameter study.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0660
Rory Sinclair, Tim Strauss, Peter Schindler
A new method for the analysis of the gas flow in an internal combustion engine has been developed. It is based on the interactive coupling between commercially available three (STAR-CD) and one dimensional (PROMO) fluid dynamics codes. With this method the detailed transient flow distribution for any engine component of interest can be calculated taking into account the overall gas dynamic interaction with other engine components. The underlying physics and numerics are outlined. A description of the coupling procedure ensuring proper communication between the two computer codes is given. Also addressed is the averaging procedure adopted at the 3D boundaries, including the influence of the 1D/3D interface placement. A first application of this new method is presented, in which the gas flow in a turbo-charged DI-diesel-engine is simulated.
1999-10-25
Technical Paper
1999-01-3660
W. Hentschel, A. Homburg, G. Ohmstede, T. Müller, G. Grünefeld
The paper describes detailed studies about the spray formation of a direct-injection high-pressure gasoline injector and the interaction of the droplets with the surrounding compressed air in pressure chamber experiments and inside an optically accessible research engine. Different optical techniques, like stroboscopic video technique, high-speed filming with flood-light illumination or with light-sheet illumination by a copper vapour laser, particle image velocimetry of the droplets, laser-induced fluorescence of the liquid phase, and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy for the measurement of the fuel/air ratio are used. From the recorded images spray characteristics such as spray penetration and spray cone angle are evaluated for different settings of the chamber pressure and temperature and for different rail pressures. The results show that all techniques are suitable to derive the quantities mentioned above.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0244
M. Schütte, G. Grünefeld, P. Andresen, W. Hentschel, A. Homburg, D. Nassif-Pugsley
One dimensional Spontaneous Raman Scattering measurements (RS) have been performed in a spray (standard gasoline, one-component and multi-component model fuels) which was operated in a high-temperature, high-pressure chamber, so that realistic engine conditions have been simulated. The present work investigates under what conditions 1D-RS can be employed for fuel/air-ratio measurements in realistic DI gasoline sprays. The distance from the spray axis has been determined, til that, coming from the outside, quantitative Raman measurement are possible. The equivalence ratio has been quantified for the one component fuel close to the spray. It turns out that the measurement error depends strongly on the type of fuel. These problems are caused by the PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) content of the fuel, which leads to interfering laser-induced fluorescence signals.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-1013
Wolfgang Sinz, Robert Greimel, Heinz Hoschopf, Karsten Raguse, Henrik Färnstrand
The use of a newly developed approach results in a highly accurate three dimensional analysis of the occupant movement. The central point of the new method is the calculation of precise body-trajectories by fitting standard sensor-measurements to video analysis data. With the new method the accuracy of the calculated trajectories is better than 5 to 10 millimeters. These body trajectories then form the basis for a new multi-body based numerical method, which allows the three dimensional reconstruction of the dummy kinematics. In addition, forces and moments acting on every single body are determined. In principle, the body movement is reconstructed by prescribing external forces and moments to every single body requiring that it follows the measured trajectory. The newly developed approach provides additional accurate information for the development engineers. For example the motion of dummy body parts not tracked by video analysis can be determined.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1351
Gareth Thomas, Robert Zobel, Thomas Schwarz
Compatibility has been a passive safety research issue for many years. Great advancements in secondary (passive) safety have been achieved in the last decades through focussing on the self-protection level provided by passenger cars. The next step is to consider the other vehicle involved in the collision as well. Compatibility relates to the simultaneous improvement of both self- and partner- protection. Several tests procedures have been proposed around the world to assess the compatibility of passenger cars. None are considered ready to be implemented. This paper shows that controlling vehicle front-end geometry is the most feasible step to improve both self- and partner-protection. Through this, an increase in the structural interaction potential offered by passenger cars would result. To improve structural interaction, a convergence of front-end structures, to within certain vertical limits, is necessary.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1534
Thorsten Gerke, Carsten Schanze
Due to the increase in demand for comfort and safety features in today's automobiles, the internal vehicle communication networks necessary to accommodate these features are very complex. These networks represent a heterogeneous architecture consisting of several ECUs exchanging information via bus systems such as CAN, LIN, MOST, or FlexRay buses. Development and verification of internal vehicle networks include multiple design layers. These layers are the logical layer represented by the software application, the associated data link layer, and the physical connection layer containing bus interfaces, wires, and termination. Verification of these systems in the early stages of the design process (before a physical network is available for testing) has become a critical need. As a result, the need to simulate these designs at all their levels of complexity has become critically important.
2010-05-05
Technical Paper
2010-01-1488
Wolfram Gottschalk, Olaf Magnor, Matthias Schultalbers, Jan Jakobs, Juergen Willand
Internal combustion engines with lean homogeneous charge and auto-ignition combustion of gasoline fuels have the capability to significantly reduce fuel consumption and realize ultra-low engine-out NOx emissions. Group research of Volkswagen AG has therefore defined the Gasoline Compression Ignition combustion (GCI®) concept. A detailed investigation of this novel combustion process has been carried out on test bench engines and test vehicles by group research of Volkswagen AG and IAV GmbH Gifhorn. Experimental results confirm the theoretically expected potential for improved efficiency and emissions behavior. Volkswagen AG and IAV GmbH will utilize a highly flexible externally supercharged variable valve train (VVT) engine for future investigations to extend the understanding of gas exchange and EGR strategy as well as the boost demands of gasoline auto-ignition combustion processes.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-1203
Rashad Mustafa, Mirko Schulze, Peter Eilts, Ferit Küçükay, Tobias Jaeckel, Christoph Lund
A vehicle thermal management system is required to increase the operating efficiency of components, to transfer the heat efficiently and to reduce the energy required for the vehicle. Vehicle thermal management technologies, such as engine compartment encapsulation together with grille shutter control, enable energy efficiency improvements through utilizing waste heat in the engine compartment for heating powertrain components as well as cabin heating and reducing the aerodynamic drag . In this work, a significant effort is put on recovering waste heat from the engine compartment to provide additional efficiency to the components using a motor compartment insulation technique and grille shutter. The tests are accelerated and the cost is reduced using a co-simulation tool based on high resolution, complex thermal and kinematics models. The results are validated with experimental values measured in a thermal wind tunnel, which provided satisfactory accuracy.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1167
Dietmar Haenchen, Thomas Schwarz, Gareth Thomas, Robert Zobel
Compatibility has been a research issue for many years now. It has gained more importance recently due to significant improvements in primary and secondary safety. Using a rigorous approach, combining accident research and theoretical scientific considerations, measures to improve vehicle-vehicle compatibility, with an emphasis on feasibility, were discussed. German accident research statistics showed that frontal impacts are of higher statistical significance than side impacts. Based on this and the high potential for improvement due high available deformation energy, the frontal impact configuration was identified as the most appropriate collision mode for addressing the compatibility issue. In side impacts, accident avoidance was identified as the most feasible and sensible measure. For frontal vehicle-vehicle impacts, both trucks and passenger cars were identified as opponents of high statistical significance.
2016-11-16
Journal Article
2016-01-9048
Martin Theile, Egon Hassel, Dominique Thévenin, Bert Buchholz, Karsten Michels, Martin Hofer
Abstract Since the mechanisms leading to cyclic combustion variabilities in direct injection gasoline engines are still poorly understood, advanced computational studies are necessary to be able to predict, analyze and optimize the complete engine process from aerodynamics to mixing, ignition, combustion and heat transfer. In this work the Scale-Adaptive Simulation (SAS) turbulence model is used in combination with a parameterized lagrangian spray model for the purpose of predicting transient in-cylinder cold flow, injection and mixture formation in a gasoline engine. An existing CFD model based on FLUENT v15.0 [1] has been extended with a spray description using the FLUENT Discrete Phase Model (DPM). This article will first discuss the validation of the in-cylinder cold flow model using experimental data measured within an optically accessible engine by High Speed Particle Image Velocimetry (HS-PIV).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0039
Karsten Schmidt, Andreas Schulze, Kai R. Richter
Abstract New technologies such as multi-core and Ethernet provide vastly improved computing and communications capabilities. This sets the foundation for the implementation of new digital megatrends in almost all areas: driver assistance, vehicle dynamics, electrification, safety, connectivity, autonomous driving. The new challenge: We must share these computing and communication capacities among all vehicle functions and their software. For this step, we need a good resource planning to minimize the probability of late resource bottlenecks (e.g. overload, lack of real-time capability, quality loss). In this article, we summarize the status quo in the field of resource management and provide an outlook on the challenges ahead.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0206
Oldřich Vítek, Jan Macek, Miloš Polášek, Stefan Schmerbeck, Thomas Kammerdiener
This paper compares 4 different EGR systems by means of simulation in GT-Power. The demands of optimum massive EGR and fresh air rates were based on experimental results. The experimental data were used to calibrate the model and ROHR, in particular. The main aim was to investigate the influence of pumping work on engine and vehicle fuel consumption (thus CO2 production) in different EGR layouts using optimum VG turbine control. These EGR systems differ in the source of pressure drop between the exhaust and intake pipes. Firstly, the engine settings were optimized under steady operation - BSFC was minimized while taking into account both the required EGR rate and fresh air mass flow. Secondly, transient simulations (NEDC cycle) were carried out - a full engine model was used to obtain detailed information on important parameters. The study shows the necessity to use natural pressure differences or renewable pressure losses if reasonable fuel consumption is to be achieved.
2007-10-07
Technical Paper
2007-01-3949
Martin Dreyer, Rolf Radespiel, Matthias Körner, Friedhelm Decker
In this paper, the experimental and numerical simulation of the flow field in the simplified front wheel arch of a scaled-down VW Phaeton half-model (scale 1:2,5) is presented. For wind tunnel experiments a realistic, rotating wheel model with plexiglass treads (PMMA) was designed. The construction allowed for detailed measurements of the flow field directly at the brake disk by means of the stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique. The formation of the flow structures and the resulting three-dimensional boundary layers on the brake disk are analyzed. Furthermore, the oncoming air flow towards the brake disk and the flow field near the wheel rim openings were investigated. The experimental data is compared with results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations using the Lattice-Boltzmann based solver Powerflow. The validation shows the potential and the limitations of the numerical approach and indicates areas of further improvement.
2009-04-20
Journal Article
2009-01-1027
Tobias Carsten Müller, Olaf Krieger, Andreas Breuer, Klaus Lange, Thomas Form
As the complexity of current automobiles increases, new and innovative diagnostic methods for car maintenance and diagnostic inspection are greatly needed. This paper introduces a new diagnostic approach, which learns from previous repair cases with the help of neural networks in order to assist future diagnostic inspections. Practical experiments have shown that this approach is able to provide promising results even with the data that is already available today.
2009-06-15
Technical Paper
2009-01-1934
Dorothea Liebig, Richard Clark, Juliane Muth, Ingo Drescher
Synthetic fuels are expected to play an important role for future mobility, because they can be introduced seamlessly alongside conventional fuels without the need for new infrastructure. Thus, understanding the interaction of GTL fuels with modern engines, and aftertreatment systems, is important. The current study investigates potential benefits of GTL fuel in respect of diesel particulate filters (DPF). Experiments were conducted on a Euro 4 TDI engine, comparing the DPF response to two different fuels, normal diesel and GTL fuel. The investigation focused on the accumulation and regeneration behavior of the DPF. Results indicated that GTL fuel reduced particulate formation to such an extent that the regeneration cycle was significantly elongated, by ∼70% compared with conventional diesel. Thus, the engine could operate for this increased time before the DPF reached maximum load and regeneration was needed.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-0803
Leire Vadillo, Iñaki Pérez, Iñaki Eguía, Mª Ángeles Gutiérrez, Beatriz González, Uwe Paar, Martin Glatzer, Glenn S. Daehn, Rafael Iturbe
Looking for car weight reduction related to the use of High Strength Steels (HSS) for manufacturing body-in-white components, an innovative application of the high velocity forming techniques has been developed: the Electro Magnetic (EM) calibration and elimination of the spring-back effect (sidewall curl) of High Strength Steel U-channels. Within this paper the initial tests on L and U-shaped parts will be presented. Being the mechanical stiffness the main parameter for improving the coil endurance, the prediction of the coil strains under EM forces is a basic issue, which has been addressed within this study.
2008-06-23
Technical Paper
2008-01-1606
Martin Tunér, Michał Pasternak, Fabian Mauss, Henry Bensler
In one-dimensional engine simulation programs the simulation of engine performance is mostly done by parameter fitting in order to match simulations with experimental data. The extensive fitting procedure is especially needed for emissions formation - CO, HC, NO, soot - simulations. An alternative to this approach is, to calculate the emissions based on detailed kinetic models. This however demands that the in-cylinder combustion-flow interaction can be modeled accurately, and that the CPU time needed for the model is still acceptable. PDF based stochastic reactor models offer one possible solution. They usually introduce only one (time dependent) parameter - the mixing time - to model the influence of flow on the chemistry. They offer the prediction of the heat release, together with all emission formation, if the optimum mixing time is given.
2008-10-06
Technical Paper
2008-01-2471
Dorothea Liebig, Winfried Krane, Pauline Ziman, Thomas Garbe, Martin Hoenig
An investigation was conducted to elucidate, how the latest turbocharged, direct injection Volkswagen diesel engine generation with cylinder pressure based closed loop control, to be launched in the US in 2008, reacts to fuel variability. A de-correlated fuels matrix was designed to bracket the range of US market fuel properties, which allowed a clear correlation of individual fuel properties with engine response. The test program consisting of steady state operating points showed that cylinder pressure based closed loop control successfully levels out the influence of fuel ignition quality, showing the effectiveness of this new technology for markets with a wide range of fuel qualities. However, it also showed that within the cetane range tested (39 to 55), despite the constant combustion mid-point, cetane number still has an influence on particulate and gaseous emissions. Volatility and energy density also influence the engine's behavior, but less strongly.
2008-03-30
Technical Paper
2008-36-0567
Leonardo Miranda, Pedro L. Ferrador, Flavio Friesen
The acoustics insulation on the car body is ones of the more important target in the NVH (Noise Vibration and Harshness) vehicle development process. The method of SEA is a validated statistical approach to solve airborne noise transmission problems. In the vehicle analysis above 300 Hz where material trim and leakage paths makes a important contribution in the vehicle interior acoustics shows the methodology its advantages over deterministic methods.
2007-01-23
Technical Paper
2007-01-0035
Rudolf R. Maly, Volker Schaefer, Heinz Hass, G. F. (Barry) Cahill, Pierre Rouveirolles, Anders Röj, Rainer Wegener, Xavier Montagne, Alessandra Di Pancrazio, Julian Kashdan
Over the next decades to come, fossil fuel powered Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) will still constitute the major powertrains for land transport. Therefore, their impact on the global and local pollution and on the use of natural resources should be minimized. To this end, an extensive fundamental and practical study was performed to evaluate the potential benefits of simultaneously co-optimizing the system fuel-and-engine using diesel as an example. It will be clearly shown that the still unused co-optimizing of the system fuel-and-engine (including advanced exhaust after-treatment) as a single entity is a must for enabling cleaner future road transport by cleaner fuels since there are large, still unexploited potentials for improvements in road fuels which will provide major reductions in pollutant emissions both in vehicles already in the field and even more so in future dedicated vehicles.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0182
Markus C. Weikl, Frank Beyrau, Alfred Leipertz, Adam Loch, Christian Jelitto, Jürgen Willand
Laser-based measurements of charge temperature and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) ratio in an homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine are demonstrated. For this purpose, the rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy technique (CARS) was used. This technique allows temporally and locally resolved measurements in combustion environments through only two small line-of-sight optical accesses and the use of standard gasoline as a fuel. The investigated engine is a production-line four-cylinder direct-injection gasoline engine with the valve strategy modified to realize HCCI-operation. CARS-measurements were performed in motored and fired operation and the results are compared to polytropic calculations. Studies of engine speed, load, valve timing, and injection pressure were conducted showing the strong influence of charge temperature on the combustion timing.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3401
Alexander Schenck zu Schweinsberg, Martin Klenk, Alf Degen
Meeting current exhaust emission standards requires rapid catalyst light-off. Closed-coupled catalysts are commonly used to reduce light-off time by minimizing exhaust heat loss between the engine and catalyst. However, this exhaust gas system design leads to a coupling of catalyst heating and engine operation. An engine-independent exhaust gas aftertreatment can be realized by combining a burner heated catalyst system (BHC) with an underfloor catalyst located far away from the engine. This paper describes some basic characteristics of such a BHC system and the results of fitting this system into a Volkswagen Touareg where a single catalyst was located about 1.8 m downstream of the engine. Nevertheless, it was possible to reach about 50% of the current European emission standard EU 4 without additional fuel consumption caused by the BHC system.
2005-10-09
Technical Paper
2005-01-3916
Ralf Meyer
The prevention of any brake noise or brake-induced body vibrations is a key development target firmly integrated in the car development process. Emphasis is placed here on disc brake judder that is attributable to thickness variations in the disc. These deviations from the ideal plane surface can be caused either by wear and corrosion or by thermal stresses (changes within the microstructure of the disc material). They are termed “cold judder” and “thermal judder” respectively. During braking, possible vibration excitation passes through a wide frequency band due to the coupling between the judder frequency and the wheel rotational speed, and thus, resonant frequencies of many vehicle components can be excited. This includes wheel suspension components and the steering column. In this paper, it is reported on extensive investigations into the topic of “cold judder”.
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