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Viewing 1 to 30 of 51
1986-10-01
Technical Paper
861350
Walter Brandstetter, Eberhard v. Lany
The VOLKSWAGEN VANAGON SYNCRO is presented as a novel 4 WD. The visco coupling is the heart of the forward drive train. Main advantages are automatic performance distribution between the axles and self-locking at extreme revolution differences between front and rear. Another important advantage of the standard 2 WD Vanagon is the well-known excellent spring suspension and damping comfort which is not negatively effected by the 4 WD technique. The vehicle is equipped with a new more powerful engine with 2,1 liter displacement and 70 kW (95 HP) nominal power output which is based on the watercooled horizontally opposed engine program. Electronic fuel injection and ignition are integrated into a unique Volkswagen system called DIGIFANTR. Vehicle performance data and fuel economy figures are given in comparison with 2 WD designs and previously available engine power train combinations.
1990-02-01
Technical Paper
900496
Wolfgang Held, Axel König, Thomas Richter, Lothar Puppe
Several different possibilities will be described and discussed on the processes of reducing NOx in lean-burn gasoline and diesel engines. In-company studies were conducted on zeolitic catalysts. With lean-burn spark-ignition engines, hydrocarbons in the exhaust gas act as a reducing agent. In stationary conditions at λ = 1.2, NOx conversion rates of approx. 45 % were achieved. With diesel engines, the only promising variant is SCR technology using urea as a reducing agent. The remaining problems are still the low space velocity and the narrow temperature window of the catalyst. The production of reaction products and secondary reactions of urea with other components in the diesel exhaust gas are still unclarified.
2009-06-15
Technical Paper
2009-01-1934
Dorothea Liebig, Richard Clark, Juliane Muth, Ingo Drescher
Synthetic fuels are expected to play an important role for future mobility, because they can be introduced seamlessly alongside conventional fuels without the need for new infrastructure. Thus, understanding the interaction of GTL fuels with modern engines, and aftertreatment systems, is important. The current study investigates potential benefits of GTL fuel in respect of diesel particulate filters (DPF). Experiments were conducted on a Euro 4 TDI engine, comparing the DPF response to two different fuels, normal diesel and GTL fuel. The investigation focused on the accumulation and regeneration behavior of the DPF. Results indicated that GTL fuel reduced particulate formation to such an extent that the regeneration cycle was significantly elongated, by ∼70% compared with conventional diesel. Thus, the engine could operate for this increased time before the DPF reached maximum load and regeneration was needed.
2005-05-16
Technical Paper
2005-01-2514
Georg Eisele, Klaus Wolff, Norbert Alt, Michel Hüser
The overall perception of a vehicle's quality is significantly influenced by its interior noise characteristics. Therefore, it is important to strike a balance between “pleasant” and “dynamic” sound that fits the customer requirements with respect to vehicle brand and class [1]. Typically, a significant share of the interior vehicle noise is transferred through structure-borne paths. Hence, the powertrain mounting system plays an important role in designing the interior noise. This paper describes an application of the method of vehicle interior noise simulation (VINS) to achieve a characteristic interior sound. This approach is based on separate measurements (or calculations) of excitations and transfer functions and subsequent calculation of the interior noise in the time domain.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0911
Juliane Wetzel, Michael Henn, Mark Gotthardt, Hermann Rottengruber
Abstract The optimization of the mixture formation represents great potential to decrease fuel consumption and emissions of spark-ignition engines. The injector and the nozzle are of major importance in this concern. In order to adjust the nozzle geometry according to the requirements an understanding of the physical transactions in the fuel spray is essential. In particular, the primary spray break-up is still described inadequately due to the difficult accessibility with optical measuring instruments. This paper presents a methodology for the characterization of the nozzle-near spray development, which substantially influences the entire spray shape. Single hole injectors of the gasoline direct injection (GDI) with different nozzle hole geometries have been investigated in a high pressure chamber by using the MIE scattering technique. To examine the spray very close to the nozzle exit a long-distance microscope in combination with a Nd:YAG-laser was used.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1537
Thomas Wittka, Bastian Holderbaum, Teuvo Maunula, Michael Weissner
The regulations for mobile applications will become stricter in Euro 6 and further emission levels and require the use of active aftertreatment methods for NOX and particulate matter. SCR and LNT have been both used commercially for mobile NOX removal. An alternative system is based on the combination of these two technologies. Developments of catalysts and whole systems as well as final vehicle demonstrations are discussed in this study. The small and full-size catalyst development experiments resulted in PtRh/LNT with optimized noble metal loadings and Cu-SCR catalyst having a high durability and ammonia adsorption capacity. For this study, an aftertreatment system consisting of LNT plus exhaust bypass, passive SCR and engine independent reductant supply by on-board exhaust fuel reforming was developed and investigated. The concept definition considers NOX conversion, CO2 drawback and system complexity.
2010-05-05
Technical Paper
2010-01-1488
Wolfram Gottschalk, Olaf Magnor, Matthias Schultalbers, Jan Jakobs, Juergen Willand
Internal combustion engines with lean homogeneous charge and auto-ignition combustion of gasoline fuels have the capability to significantly reduce fuel consumption and realize ultra-low engine-out NOx emissions. Group research of Volkswagen AG has therefore defined the Gasoline Compression Ignition combustion (GCI®) concept. A detailed investigation of this novel combustion process has been carried out on test bench engines and test vehicles by group research of Volkswagen AG and IAV GmbH Gifhorn. Experimental results confirm the theoretically expected potential for improved efficiency and emissions behavior. Volkswagen AG and IAV GmbH will utilize a highly flexible externally supercharged variable valve train (VVT) engine for future investigations to extend the understanding of gas exchange and EGR strategy as well as the boost demands of gasoline auto-ignition combustion processes.
2012-04-16
Journal Article
2012-01-1203
Rashad Mustafa, Mirko Schulze, Peter Eilts, Ferit Küçükay, Tobias Jaeckel, Christoph Lund
A vehicle thermal management system is required to increase the operating efficiency of components, to transfer the heat efficiently and to reduce the energy required for the vehicle. Vehicle thermal management technologies, such as engine compartment encapsulation together with grille shutter control, enable energy efficiency improvements through utilizing waste heat in the engine compartment for heating powertrain components as well as cabin heating and reducing the aerodynamic drag . In this work, a significant effort is put on recovering waste heat from the engine compartment to provide additional efficiency to the components using a motor compartment insulation technique and grille shutter. The tests are accelerated and the cost is reduced using a co-simulation tool based on high resolution, complex thermal and kinematics models. The results are validated with experimental values measured in a thermal wind tunnel, which provided satisfactory accuracy.
1997-10-01
Technical Paper
972832
Werner Hentschel, Andreas Grote, Olaf Langer
This paper reports on a non-intrusive method for measuring the liquid fuel film thickness in the intake manifold of a series production SI engine with multi-point fuel injection. The technique is based on laser-induced fluorescence. The optical set-up uses a bifurcated optical fibre bundle for transmission of the laser light for excitation of the fluid and for detecting of the fluorescence light. Due to the special design of the optical probe head it is highly sensitive for thin film measurements and it allows the accurate determination of the fuel film thickness even between a few and 100 μm. Special emphasis is placed on the selection of an adequate tracer added to the iso-octane fuel to achieve the correct film thickness even under vaporizing conditions, and on a detailed study of the parameters influencing the evaluated film thickness.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970827
Michael Knapp, Volker Beushausen, Werner Hentschel, Peter Manz, Gerd Grünefeld, Peter Andresen
Mixture formation analysis in the combustion chamber of a slightly modified mass-production SI engine with port-fuel injection using nonintrusive laser measurement techniques is presented. Laser Raman scattering and planar laser-induced tracer fluorescence are employed to measure air-fuel ratio and residual gas content of the charge with and without spatial resolution. Single-cycle measurements as well as cycle-averaged measurements are performed. Engine operation parameters like load, speed, injection timing, spark timing, coolant temperature, and mean air-fuel ratio are changed to study whether the effects on mixture formation and engine performance can be resolved by the applied laser spectroscopic techniques. Mixture formation is also analyzed by measurement of the charge composition as a function of crank angle. Clear correlations of the charge composition data and engine operating conditions are seen.
1997-02-24
Technical Paper
970824
Michael Knapp, Andreas Luczak, Volker Beushausen, Werner Hentschel, Peter Manz, Peter Andresen
Quantitative 1-D spatially-resolved NO LIF measurements in the combustion chamber of a mass-production SI engine with port-fuel injection using a tunable KrF excimer laser are presented. One of the main advantages of this approach is that KrF laser radiation at 248 nm is only slightly absorbed by the in-cylinder gases during engine combustion and therefore it allows measurements at all crank angles. Multispecies detection turned out to be crucial for this approach since it is possible to calculate the in-cylinder temperature from the detected Rayleigh scattering and the simultaneously acquired pressure traces. Additionally, it allows the monitoring of interfering emissions and spectroscopic effects like fluorescence trapping which turned out to take place. Excitation with 248 nm yields LIF emissions at shorter wavelengths than the laser wavelength (at 237 and 226 nm).
1997-08-06
Technical Paper
972686
B. Georgi, S. Hunkert, J. Liang, M. Willmann
Volkswagen is the first automobile manufacturer to supply a passenger car with a direct fuel injection diesel engine to the US market, starting 1996. To meet the stringent US exhaust gas legislation the very successful European 1.9 liter TDI engine has been further developed for the 1996 and 1997 Passat. This TD1 incorporates a number of innovations in advanced diesel technology. Emissions-reducing innovations include: reduced crevice volume higher injection pressures upgraded injection management integrated EGR manifold system EGR cooling diesel catalytic converter This TDI engine configuration is also to be offered in the 1997 Golf and Jetta class and the new Passat in model year 1998. Over the coming years the TDI engine concept will be further optimized by utilizing variations of the above innovations.
1994-03-01
Technical Paper
940932
Wolfgang Held, Manfred Rohlfs, Wolfgang Maus, Helmut Swars, Rolf Brück, Friedrich W. Kaiser
1994-10-01
Technical Paper
941954
Werner Hentschel, Klaus-Peter Schindler, Otso Haahtela
Within the European research programme IDEA (Integrated Diesel European Action), detailed experimental and theoretical studies of the fundamental phenomena of the Diesel engine like flow, injection, mixture formation, auto-ignition, combustion and pollutant formation were carried out to improve knowledge and to set up models for a simulation code. Because this basic research of the Diesel combustion process is very complex and cost intensive, it was carried out jointly by the JRC (Joint Research Committee), an association of European car manufacturers (Fiat, Peugeot SA, Renault, Volvo and Volkswagen). The activities were also subsidized by the Commission of the European Communities and the Swedish National Board of Technical Development. The results of the research work will support the design of even more efficient engines and the further reduction of soot and NOx emissions and will also enable the companies to reduce time and cost in developing new engines.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950213
S. Röpke, G. W. Schweimer, T. S. Strauss
The NO formation is essentially determined by the flame temperature. In an engine the latter depends on the composition of the fuel and the intake gas. In this study the efficiency of various NO reducing measures is analysed by means of a comparison of measurements and computations for the Most frequent operation point of a 1.9 1 DI Diesel engine. The O2 concentration, which is shown to be the dominant source of influence on the flame temperature and NO formation, is varied using synthetic gas mixtures or by EGR. The molar heat capacity of CO2 and H2O in the recirculated exhaust gas, the intake temperature and the H/C ratio in the fuel are less important for the formation of NO. Measures which reduce the NO formation increase the ignition delay and thereby the fraction of the premixed combustion. The impact of EGR on the combustion process is illustrated by high speed filming.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950280
Tim Sebastian Strauss, Georg Wolfgang Schweimer, Ulrich Ritscher
The combustion and pollutant formation processes in a 1.9 I IDI Diesel engine are simulated with the SPEED computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. A part and a full load simulation of the production engine and a full load simulation of a modified engine design are analyzed. The mixing and combustion process is visualized for all cases by means of the isosurfaces of stoichiometric mixture. The correlation of this surface with global quantities as heat release, mean pressure and temperature and swirl ratio is emphasized. The global properties are presented resolved for the swirl, main chamber and the swirl chamber throat separately. The formation of thermal NO and soot are simulated and analyzed.
1995-10-01
Technical Paper
952517
Werner Hentschel, Jens-Uwe Richter
The formation of soot during the first phase and the oxidation of soot during the later phase of the combustion in a direct-injection diesel engine have been investigated in detail by an extinction method. The experiments were performed in a 1.9 l near-production high-speed four-cylinder in-line direct-injection diesel engine for passenger cars for different rates of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and for different fuels. The measurements result in crank angle resolved and cycle-averaged soot mass concentrations in the piston bowl and the combustion chamber. The results show that with increasing EGR-rates the amount of soot formed is increased only slightly but the amount of soot oxidized during combustion decreases significantly. This is assumed to be the main reason for the increase of soot in the exhaust gas with increasing EGR-rates.
1995-10-01
Technical Paper
952461
A. Roller, A. Arnold Paul, M. Decker, V. Sick, J. Wolfrum, W. Hentschel, K.-P. Schindler
Non-intrusive temperature measurements based on single-line laser-induced fluorescence of molecular oxygen in the transparent IDEA Diesel engine were investigated. Oxygen molecules were excited to fluorescence with a narrowband, tunable ArF excimer laser at 193 nm. The resulting fluorescence signals were recorded with an image-intensified CCD camera. The temperature increase during the compression phase of the four-cylinder direct injection Diesel engine could be evaluated from the LIF signals. In the crank angle range of the measurements, good agreement between measured and calculated temperatures (polytropic compression) was observed.
1995-10-01
Technical Paper
952356
C. Arcoumanis, A. Nagwaney, W. Hentschel, S. Ropke
The spray development, combustion and emissions in a 1.9L optical, four-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine were investigated by means of pressure analysis, high-speed cinematography, the two-colour method and exhaust gas analysis for various levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), three EGR temperatures (uncontrolled, hot and cold) and three fuels (diesel, n-heptane and a two-component fuel 7D3N). Engine operating conditions included 1000 rpm/idle and 2000 rpm/2bar with EGR-rates ranging from 0 to 70%. Independent of rate, EGR was found to have a very small effect on spray angle and spray tip penetration but the auto-ignition sites seemed to increase in size and number at higher EGR-rates with associated reduction in the flame luminosity and flame temperature, by, say, 100K at 50% EGR.
1996-05-01
Technical Paper
961206
H. Chaves, W. Hentschel, F. Obermeier, B. Stasicki
For high-speed imaging a newly developed eight-fold CCD camera, which permits framing rates of up to one million pictures per second, was used to obtain pictures of the injected sprays during the operation of a diesel engine. For the particular case studied here the framing rate was set at 50,000 pictures per second. This rate was sufficient to resolve the temporal development of the sprays in the transparent version of the four-cylinder, in-line, 1.9 litre DI production diesel engine of Volkswagen. The advantage of the camera is that it needs no light pulses for illumination, but can operate with a continuous light source. Each of the CCD chips is arranged around a central eight face reflecting pyramid, which splits the light coming from the camera lens to each CCD chip. The chips can be shuttered freely (asynchronously) at programmable inter-frame spacings thus permitting operation with continuous illumination. In this particular case a 30 Watt halogen lamp was used.
1996-10-01
Technical Paper
961999
P.-W. Manz
Abstract This paper describes an investigation of one operating point of the transient warmup curve of a gasoline engine. Coolant liquid and oil of this engine have been cooled down to a constant low level in order to perform detailed measurements and an analysis of this particular warmup point. The influence of low coolant temperature, different pressure drop in an air assisted fuel injection system and a variation of ignition angles on specific fuel consumption, exhaust emissions, energy conversion etc. will be shown. The results show that the suggested test procedure (keeping the coolant temperature at a constant low level) provides the possibility to simulate the behaviour of an engine with air assisted fuel injection during warmup. During this warmup period it is desired to run the engine with retarded ignition timing to realize a fast catalyst warmup.
1996-10-01
Technical Paper
962041
Axel König, Thomas Richter, Edward Jobson, Michael Preis, Emanuele Leveroni, Bernd Krutzsch, Rémi Noirot, Michèle Chevrier
In a joint research project between industrial companies and a number of research institutes, nitrogen oxide conversion in oxygen containing exhaust gas has been investigated according to the following procedure Basic investigations of elementary steps of the chemical reaction Production and prescreening of different catalytic material on laboratory scale Application oriented screening of industrial catalyst material Catalyst testing on a lean bum gasoline engine, passenger car diesel engines (swirl chamber and DI) and on a DI truck engine Although a number of solid body structures show nitrogen oxide reduction by hydrocarbons, only noble metal containing catalysts and transition metal exchanged zeolites gave catalytic efficiencies of industrial relevance. A maximum of 25 % NOx reduction was found in the European driving cycle for passenger cars, about 40 % for truck engines in the respective European test.
1996-05-01
Technical Paper
961122
Michael Knapp, Andreas Luczak, Volker Beushausen, Werner Hentschel, Peter Andresen
Laser-induced exciplex fluorescence has been applied to the mixture formation process in the combustion chamber of an optically-accessible four-cylinder in-line spark-ignition engine in order to distinguish between liquid and vapor fuel distribution during the intake and compression stroke for different injection timings. The naphthalene/N,N,N′N′-tetramethyl p-phenylene diamine (TMPD) exciplex system excited at 308nm with a broadband XeCl excimer laser is used to obtain spectrally-separated, single-shot fluorescence images of the liquid or vapor phase of the fuel. For different timings of the fuel injector this technique is applied to obtain crank-angle-resolved images of the resulting mixture in the combustion chamber. The fluorescence light is detected with an intensified slow-scan CCD-camera equipped with appropriate filters.
1995-10-01
Technical Paper
952394
Gerd Grüefeld, Michael Knapp, Volker Beushausen, Peter Andresen, Werner Hentschel, Peter Manz
A recently developed Laser Raman Scattering system was applied to measure the in-cylinder air-fuel ratio and the residual gas content (via the water content) of the charge simultaneously in a firing spark-ignition engine during cold start and warm-up. It is the main objective of this work to elucidate the origin of misfires and the necessity to over-fuel at cool ambient temperatures. It turns out that the overall air-fuel ratio and residual gas content (in particular the residual water content) of the charge appear to be the most important parameters for the occurrence of misfires (without appropriate fuel enrichment), i.e., the engine behaviour from cycle to cycle becomes rather predictable on the basis of these data. An alternative explanation for the necessity to over-fuel is given.
1998-10-19
Technical Paper
98C056
Horst Friedrich, Siegfried Köhle, Peter Lück
In addition to the price factor, the success of an electric vehicle primarily depends on its performance characteristics and operating range. Advances both in vehicle design and better technology help to improve these characteristics, thus providing the customer with a convincing vehicle concept. Three vehicle generations will be examined and the development advances between 1993 and 2003 will be listed by way of comparison. Improvement potential and technical limits will be analyzed from cost aspects. Since the limits of battery technology cannot be extended at will, it is necessary to develop both battery-driven electric vehicles and vehicles fitted with hybrid drive units. Based on the drive technology of purely electric-powered vehicles, concepts of range extender hybrid and fuel-cell hybrid vehicles will be presented.
1998-08-11
Technical Paper
981950
D. Bosch, U. Dörges, G. Goergens, S. Hunkert, J. R. Liang
With the introduction of the New Beetle, Volkswagen is offering the next generation of the 1.9l TDI engine. Several evolutionary changes have been made to the TDI concept to further improve its emissions, efficiency and performance. Emissions performance is improved with increased fuel injection pressure, optimized fuel injectors, calibration modifications, EGR cooling and reduced crevice volume in the combustion chamber. Efficiency is improved with new oil pump, vacuum pump and water pump drive systems and the elimination of an auxiliary driveshaft. Performance and efficiency is improved with the addition of a variable geometry turbocharger, which increases torque at lower engine speeds while preserving performance at higher engine speeds. This paper describes the many enhancements found in this latest generation TDI and gives a brief lookout to the future trends in diesel engine development such as a high pressure injection system with unit injectors.
2007-01-23
Technical Paper
2007-01-0035
Rudolf R. Maly, Volker Schaefer, Heinz Hass, G. F. (Barry) Cahill, Pierre Rouveirolles, Anders Röj, Rainer Wegener, Xavier Montagne, Alessandra Di Pancrazio, Julian Kashdan
Over the next decades to come, fossil fuel powered Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) will still constitute the major powertrains for land transport. Therefore, their impact on the global and local pollution and on the use of natural resources should be minimized. To this end, an extensive fundamental and practical study was performed to evaluate the potential benefits of simultaneously co-optimizing the system fuel-and-engine using diesel as an example. It will be clearly shown that the still unused co-optimizing of the system fuel-and-engine (including advanced exhaust after-treatment) as a single entity is a must for enabling cleaner future road transport by cleaner fuels since there are large, still unexploited potentials for improvements in road fuels which will provide major reductions in pollutant emissions both in vehicles already in the field and even more so in future dedicated vehicles.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0182
Markus C. Weikl, Frank Beyrau, Alfred Leipertz, Adam Loch, Christian Jelitto, Jürgen Willand
Laser-based measurements of charge temperature and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) ratio in an homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine are demonstrated. For this purpose, the rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy technique (CARS) was used. This technique allows temporally and locally resolved measurements in combustion environments through only two small line-of-sight optical accesses and the use of standard gasoline as a fuel. The investigated engine is a production-line four-cylinder direct-injection gasoline engine with the valve strategy modified to realize HCCI-operation. CARS-measurements were performed in motored and fired operation and the results are compared to polytropic calculations. Studies of engine speed, load, valve timing, and injection pressure were conducted showing the strong influence of charge temperature on the combustion timing.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3401
Alexander Schenck zu Schweinsberg, Martin Klenk, Alf Degen
Meeting current exhaust emission standards requires rapid catalyst light-off. Closed-coupled catalysts are commonly used to reduce light-off time by minimizing exhaust heat loss between the engine and catalyst. However, this exhaust gas system design leads to a coupling of catalyst heating and engine operation. An engine-independent exhaust gas aftertreatment can be realized by combining a burner heated catalyst system (BHC) with an underfloor catalyst located far away from the engine. This paper describes some basic characteristics of such a BHC system and the results of fitting this system into a Volkswagen Touareg where a single catalyst was located about 1.8 m downstream of the engine. Nevertheless, it was possible to reach about 50% of the current European emission standard EU 4 without additional fuel consumption caused by the BHC system.
2005-10-09
Technical Paper
2005-01-3916
Ralf Meyer
The prevention of any brake noise or brake-induced body vibrations is a key development target firmly integrated in the car development process. Emphasis is placed here on disc brake judder that is attributable to thickness variations in the disc. These deviations from the ideal plane surface can be caused either by wear and corrosion or by thermal stresses (changes within the microstructure of the disc material). They are termed “cold judder” and “thermal judder” respectively. During braking, possible vibration excitation passes through a wide frequency band due to the coupling between the judder frequency and the wheel rotational speed, and thus, resonant frequencies of many vehicle components can be excited. This includes wheel suspension components and the steering column. In this paper, it is reported on extensive investigations into the topic of “cold judder”.
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