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Viewing 1 to 30 of 48
1991-09-01
Technical Paper
911906
Tor Larsson, Kjell ac Bergstrom, Ake Bengtsson, John Petersson, Ingemar Denbratt
During 1991 Volvo Car Corporation has introduced the new Volvo 850 GLT model featuring front wheel drive with transverse installation of the engine and gearbox. The powertrain; consists of a new in-line five-cylinder engine in combination with a four speed electronically controlled automatic gearbox or a five speed manual gearbox. The engine features DOHC 20 valves, V-VIS (Volvo Variable Induction System), well tuned exhaust system and microprocessor controlled engine management systems. The engine was designed and developed as a new member of Volvo's modular engine family. The first member was the in-line six-cylinder engine B6304F [1] introduced in 1990. The modular engines have a large number of identical components and the major components are machined in common transfer lines which makes the manufacturing process highly rational and cost-effective.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1569
Andrzej Pietrzyk
A broad measurement campaign was run at Volvo aiming at the evaluation of dispersion in test-based NVH characteristics of a car body and at the derivation of reference data for judging the accuracy of CAE predictions. Within this work 6, nominally identical, vehicles were tested. Tests included operational noise on Complete Vehicle (CV) level (road noise, engine noise and idling noise), NTF, VTF & Acoustic FRF measurements in CV, Trimmed Body (TB) & TB-Stripped (TBS) configurations. Additionally, modal analysis and NTF, VTF, AFRF tests were carried out on 4 BIPs of the same vehicle type. Further, limited tests were carried out on 28 vehicles of the same type. The aim of the work was to study the development of dispersion with increasing complexity of the test object, from the BIP to TB and CV.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1674
Magnus Olsson, Mikael Törmänen, Sylvain Sauvage, Catharina Hansen
In modern vehicles, each system must meet tough demands to fulfill the many different attribute requirements, design constraints and manufacturing limitations. It becomes difficult and time-consuming to find an optimal and robust design using a traditional engineering process. Volvo Cars has for several years been using Multi-Disciplinary Optimization, MDO, that basically shows the customer attributes levels, such as NVH, ride comfort, and driveability as a function of different parameter configurations. This greatly facilitates project team understanding of the limitations and possibilities of the different systems, and has become a key enabler to achieving a good balance between different attributes. Traditionally, this type of comprehensive Design of Experiments (DOE) optimization demands huge time and computer resources. Frequently, experimental designs will not fulfill manufacturing limitations or attribute targets, making this decision process slow, tedious, and fruitless.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0733
Anders Wirje, Kristian Carlsson
The durability peak load events Driving over a curb and Skid against a curb have been simulated in Adams for a Volvo S80. Simulated responses in the front wheel suspension have been validated by comparison with measurements. Due to the extreme nature of the peak load events, the component modeling is absolutely critical for the accuracy of the simulations. All components have to be described within their full range of excitation. Key components and behaviors to model have been identified as tire with wheel strike-through, contacts between curb and tire and between curb and rim, flexibility of structural components, bump stops, bushings, shock absorbers, and camber stiffness of the suspension. Highly non-linear component responses are captured in Adams. However, since Adams only allows linear material response for flexible bodies, the proposed methods to simulate impact loads are only valid up to small, plastic strains.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0473
Magdalena Lindman, Emma Tivesten
One way of avoiding crashes or mitigating the consequences of a crash is to apply an autonomous braking system. Quantifying the benefit of such a system in terms of injury reduction is a challenge. At the same time it is a fundamental input into the vehicle development process. This paper describes a method to estimate the effectiveness of reducing speed prior to impact. A holistic view of quantifying the benefit is presented, based on existing real life crash data and basic dynamic theories. It involves a systematic and new way of examining accident data in order to extract information concerning pre-crash situations. One problem area when implementing collision mitigation systems is being able to achieve sufficient target discrimination. The results from the case study highlight frontal impact situations from real world accident data that have the greatest potential in terms of improving accident outcome.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0608
Stefan Solyom, Sören Eriksson
The article describes a model-based control method for idle speed of spark-ignition (SI) engines. It is based on mid-ranging, a multivariable control strategy that is more commonly used in process control. The basic building blocks of the control structure are two PI controllers.
2012-06-13
Technical Paper
2012-01-1559
Sabry Allam, Magnus Knutsson, Hans Boden
Automotive turbo compressors generate high frequency noise in the air intake system. This sound generation is of importance for the perceived sound quality of luxury cars and may need to be controlled by the use of silencers. The silencers usually contain resonators with slits, perforates and cavities. The purpose of the present work is to develop acoustic models for these resonators where relevant effects such as the effect of a realistic mean flow on losses and 3D effects are considered. An experimental campaign has been performed where the two-port matrices and transmission loss of sample resonators have been measured without flow and for two different mean flow speeds. Models for two resonators have been developed using 1D linear acoustic theory and a FEM code (COMSOL Multi-physics). For some resonators a separate linear 1D Matlab code has also been developed.
2012-09-10
Technical Paper
2012-01-1572
Fredrik B. Ekstrom, Joop Somhorst
Passenger cars equipped with diesel engines will meet challenging emission legislation for the coming decade, with introduction of Euro6 and Euro7, which comprises reduced NOX emissions and possibly new driving cycles including off-cycle limits. The technology measures to meet these legislative limits comprise a broad spectrum of engine and aftertreatment, i.e., engine measures such as improved fuel injection with respect to mass and timing, improved exhaust gas recirculation, improved warm-up and reduced friction, as well as aftertreatment measures such as selective catalytic reduction and lean NOX trap in combination with diesel particulate filter, and the thereby associated engine control. The resulting technology matrix is therefore large, and calls for a multidisciplinary simulation approach for appropriate selection and optimization of technology and control with the objectives and constraints of emissions, fuel consumption, performance and cost.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-0355
Markus Grahn, Krister Johansson, Christian Vartia, Tomas McKelvey
The development and implementation of a new structure for data-driven models for NOX and soot emissions is described. The model structure is a linear regression model, where physically relevant input signals are used as regressors, and all the regression parameters are defined as grid-maps in the engine speed/injected fuel domain. The method of using grid-maps in the engine speed/injected fuel domain for all the regression parameters enables the models to be valid for changes in physical parameters that affect the emissions, without having to include these parameters as input signals to the models. This is possible for parameters that are dependent only on the engine speed and the amount of injected fuel. This means that models can handle changes for different parameters in the complete working range of the engine, without having to include all signals that actually effect the emissions into the models.
1998-09-29
Technical Paper
982311
Mikael Fermér, Magnus Andréasson, Björn Frodin
A finite-element (FE) based method for numerically predicting fatigue life of MAG-welded thin-sheet structures has been established and tested. The method uses nodal forces and moments calculated along the weld line, together with an analytical expression for the structural stress at the weld toe. The calculated stress is used together with an experimentally determined Wöhler, or S-N, curve. A “stiff” welded joint with structural stress dominated by membrane forces is found to have a steeper S-N curve than a “flexible” joint with structural stress dominated by bending moment. All test results were seen to lie close to one of two different S-N curves. The proportion of bending stress over total structural stress could be used for choosing the appropriate S-N curve.
1998-09-29
Technical Paper
982269
Lutz Hanicke, Robert Häller, Patric Högström
To give the customer an immediate impression of quality several of criteria must be fulfilled such as styling, paint finish and fitting of outer panels/closures. Therefore, higher demands on geometrical quality e.g. stability for both exterior and interior are needed. The structural part of the car body is the key element for success. Beside the visual impression, lack of noise and vibrations during driving can convince a potential buyer to become an actual customer. To achieve this, car manufacturers have to draw up an overall strategy in combination with proper working methods to be able to guarantee a stable geometrical output throughout the entire development process and during series production over the lifetime of the vehicle. On a simultaneous engineering basis, the OEM, the system/component- and the process suppliers (for the industrial system from press shop to final assembly) have to adopt a common measurement strategy.
2005-06-14
Technical Paper
2005-01-2722
Dan Lämkull, Lars Hanson, Roland Örtengren
The objective of this paper is to investigate whether different appearance modes of the digital human models (DHM or manikins) affect the observers when judging a working posture. A case where the manikin is manually assembling a battery in the boot with help of a lifting device is used in the experiment. 16 different pictures were created and presented for the subjects. All pictures have the same background, but include a unique posture and manikin appearance combination. Four postures and four manikin appearances were used. The subjects were asked to rank the pictures after ergonomic assessment based on posture of the manikin. Subjects taking part in the study were either manufacturing engineering managers, simulation engineers or ergonomists. Results show that the different appearance modes affect the ergonomic judgment. A more realistic looking manikin is rated higher than the very same posture visualized with a less natural appearance.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0200
S. Etemad, J. Wallesten, C.F. Stein, S. Eriksson, K. Johansson
It is demonstrated that the cycle averaged heat flux on the hot gas side of the cylinders can be obtained using in-cylinder CFD-analysis. Together with the heat transfer coefficient obtained from the coolant jacket CFD-analysis, a complete set of boundary conditions are made available exclusively based on simulations. The engine metal temperatures could then be predicted using FEA and the results are compared to an extensive set of measured data. Also 1-D codes are used to provide cooling circuit boundary conditions and gas exchange boundary condition for the CFD-models. The predicted temperature distribution in the engine is desirable for accurate and reliable prediction of knock, durability problems, bore distortion and valve seat distortion.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0109
Christian Fyhr, Olof Dahlberg
When developing gas exchange and combustion systems at Volvo Car Corporation, CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) is today a key tool. Three dimensional CFD is by tradition used to study one single component (e.g. manifolds and ports) at a time. Our experience is that this approach suffers from two main limitations; first that the boundary conditions (both upstream and downstream) are uncertain; and secondly that validation against experimental data is extremely difficult since any measured parameter will depend on the complete engine. Distribution of secondary gases and AFR (Air to Fuel ratio) are typical examples where traditional CFD methods fail. One proposed way to overcome these problems is to use 1D gas exchange models coupled with 3D CFD. The main problem with this approach is however the positioning and treatment of the boundaries between the models. Furthermore, the boundaries themselves will unconditionally cause disturbances in the pressure fields.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-2884
Nader Asnafi, Gunnar Lassl, Björn Olsson, Tomas Nilsson
In this study, hydropiercing after hydroforming and prior to unloading was investigated. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate how the used hydropiercing method and the selected material and process parameters affect the hole quality. Hydropiercing inwards, hydropiercing by folding the ‘scrap’ piece inwards and hydropiercing outwards were tested. The tube material was extruded AA6063-T4. The tube diameter and wall thickness were 107 mm and 2.5 mm respectively. Straight 1110-mm long tubes of this material were first hydroformed at 1300 bar and then hydropierced. Assuming that the largest (in magnitude) acceptable deflection at the hole edge is 0.2 mm, hydropiercing inwards at ≥ 1300 bar yield the best hole quality. However, the remaining scrap piece (in the tube) causes a handling problem that must be solved.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0051
Anders Jerhamre, Anders Jönson
This paper describes the development of a robust and accurate method to model one-phase heat exchangers in complete vehicle air flow simulations along with a comprehensive comparison of EFD and CFD results. The comparison shows that the inlet radiator coolant temperatures obtained with CFD were within ±4°C of the experimental data with a trend in the differences being dependent on the car speed. The relative differences in cooling air mass flow rates increase with increasing car speed, with CFD values generally higher than EFD. From the investigation, the conclusion is that the methodology and modeling technique presented offer an accurate tool for concept and system solutions on the front end design, cooling package and fan. Care must be taken in order to provide the best possible boundary conditions paying particular attention to the heat losses in the engine, performance data for the radiator and fan characteristics.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-2751
Nicklas Bylund
Car body structures and the joints between beam members have a great impact on global vehicle stiffness. With the method presented in this paper it is possible to experimentally assess the stiffness of joints by a robust and economic means. The stiffness of a beam can easily be found experimentally just by cutting it in two and using the cross-sections to calculate the polar moment of inertia. When it comes to a joint, there are no formulae or explicit expressions describing its behavior. Therefore, measurement of its mechanical behavior has to be made. The dynamic joint method presented here does not need levers or a costly, rigid set-up, but an economical free-free set-up and cast-on weights. Furthermore, the same method can be emulated by FEM when a digital model exists.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-2755
Harald A. Fredricson
Structural topology optimization is a truly interesting and important area, which has developed very rapidly and matured considerably in many fields. However, the use of topology optimization for global structures, using detailed design, is still tremendously time-consuming. From this perspective, the author sees the development of methods and tools to include optimization on simplified models during the design process as the most interesting and important step towards implementing structure topology optimization in the vehicle industry. In the design process, structures are broken down into beams and joints, and are described using a PBM (Property Based Model). Beams are described using a rectangular cross-section with the possibility of being changed in size, shape and orientation. Joints are described as flexible elements using a set of sub-elements called 2-joints that makes it possible for the joint model to change topology and stiffness.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0728
Per Olsson
This paper presents how hardware in the loop (HIL) simulations have been used for testing during the development of the adaptive cruise control (ACC) and collision warning with brake support (CWBS) functions implemented in the Volvo S80. Both the brake system controller and the controller where the ACC and CWBS functions were implemented were tested. The HIL simulator was used for automated batch simulations in which different controller software releases were analyzed from both system, fail-safe and functional performance perspectives. This paper presents the challenges and the benefits of using HIL simulations when developing distributed active safety functions. Some specific simulation results are analyzed and discussed. The conclusion shows that although it is difficult and time-consuming to develop a complete HIL simulation environment for active safety functions such as ACC and CWBS, the benefits justify the investment.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0127
Fredrik Törner, D. J. Chen, Rolf Johansson, Henrik Lönn, Martin Törngren
Automotive electronic systems are becoming safety related causing a need for more systematic and stringent approaches for demonstrating the functional safety. The safety case consists of an argumentation, supported by evidence, of why the system is safe to operate in a given context. It is dependent on referencing and aggregating information which is part of the EAST-ADL2, an architecture description language for automotive embedded systems. This paper explores the possibilities of integrating the safety case metamodel with the EAST-ADL2, enabling safety case development in close connection to the system model. This is done by including a safety case object in EAST-ADL2, and defining the external and internal relations.
2008-04-14
Technical Paper
2008-01-0097
Lasse Christoffersen, David Söderblom, Lennart Löfdahl, Anders Jönson
During the development of the aerodynamic properties of fore coming road vehicles down scaled models are often used in the initial phase. However, if scale models are to be utilised even further in the aerodynamic development they have to include geometrical representatives of most of the components found in the real vehicle. As the cooling package is one of the biggest single generators of aerodynamic drag the heat exchangers are essential to include in a wind tunnel model. However, due mainly to limitations in manufacturing techniques it is complicated to make a down scaled heat exchanger and instead functional dummy heat exchangers have to be developed for scaled wind tunnel models. In this work a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code has been used to show that it is important that the simplified heat exchanger model has to be of comparable size to that of the full scale unit.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0875
Ludvig Adlercreutz, Andreas Cronhjort, Johannes Andersen, Roy Ogink
Abstract With alternative fuels having moved more into market in light of their reduction of emissions of CO2 and other air pollutants, the spark ignited internal combustion engine design has only been affected to small extent. The development of combustion engines running on natural gas or Biogas have been focused to maintain driveability on gasoline, creating a multi fuel platform which does not fully utilise the alternative fuels’ potential. However, optimising these concepts on a fundamental level for gas operation shows a great potential to increase the level of utilisation and effectiveness of the engine and thereby meeting the emissions legislation. The project described in this paper has focused on optimising a combustion concept for CNG combustion on a single cylinder research engine. The ICE’s efficiency at full load and the fuels characteristics, including its knock resistance, is of primary interest - together with part load performance and overall fuel consumption.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2533
Mirko Bovo, Joop Somhorst
The focus on engine thermal management is rapidly increasing due to the significant effect of heat losses on fuel consumption, engine performance and emissions. This work presents a time resolved, high resolution 3D engine heat balance model, including all relevant components. Notably, the model calculates the conjugated heat transfer between the solid engine components, the coolant and the oil. Both coolant and oil circuits are simultaneously resolved with a CFD solver in the same finite volume model as the entire engine solid parts. The model includes external convection and radiation. The necessary boundary conditions of the thermodynamic cycle (gas side) are mapped from a calibrated 1D gas exchange model of the same engine. The boundary conditions for the coolant and at the oil circuits are estimated with 1D models of the systems. The model is calibrated and verified with measurement data from the same engine as modeled.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1582
Dirk Wieser, Sabine Bonitz, Lennart Lofdahl, Alexander Broniewicz, Christian Nayeri, Christian Paschereit, Lars Larsson
Abstract Flow visualization techniques are widely used in aerodynamics to investigate the surface trace pattern. In this experimental investigation, the surface flow pattern over the rear end of a full-scale passenger car is studied using tufts. The movement of the tufts is recorded with a DSLR still camera, which continuously takes pictures. A novel and efficient tuft image processing algorithm has been developed to extract the tuft orientations in each image. This allows the extraction of the mean tuft angle and other such statistics. From the extracted tuft angles, streamline plots are created to identify points of interest, such as saddle points as well as separation and reattachment lines. Furthermore, the information about the tuft orientation in each time step allows studying steady and unsteady flow phenomena. Hence, the tuft image processing algorithm provides more detailed information about the surface flow than the traditional tuft method.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1606
Charalampos Kounenis, Sabine Bonitz, Emil Ljungskog, David Sims-Williams, Lennart Lofdahl, Alexander Broniewicz, Lars Larsson, Simone Sebben
Abstract The aerodynamic drag, fuel consumption and hence CO2 emissions, of a road vehicle depend strongly on its flow structures and the pressure drag generated. The rear end flow which is an area of complex three-dimensional flow structures, contributes to the wake development and the overall aerodynamic performance of the vehicle. This paper seeks to provide improved insight into this flow region to better inform future drag reduction strategies. Using experimental and numerical techniques, two vehicle shapes have been studied; a 30% scale model of a Volvo S60 representing a 2003MY vehicle and a full scale 2010MY S60. First the surface topology of the rear end (rear window and trunk deck) of both configurations is analysed, using paint to visualise the skin friction pattern. By means of critical points, the pattern is characterized and changes are identified studying the location and type of the occurring singularities.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1368
Hongwen Wu, Johan Brunberg, Mireia Altimira, Niclas Bratt, Henrik Nyberg, Andreas Cronhjort, Justinas Peciura
Abstract To improve fuel efficiency and facilitate handling of the vehicle in a dense city environment, it should be as small as possible given its intended application. This downsizing trend impacts the size of the engine bay, where the air filter box has to be packed in a reduced space, still without increased pressure drop, reduced load capacity nor lower filtering efficiency. Due to its flexibility and reduced cost, CFD simulations play an important role in the optimization process of the filter design. Even though the air-flow through the filter box changes as the dust load increases, the current modeling framework seldom account for such time dependence. Volvo Car Corporation presents an industrial affordable model to solve the time-dependent dust load on filter elements and calculate the corresponding flow behavior over the life time of the air filter box.
2015-12-01
Journal Article
2015-01-9116
Filip Nielsen, Sam Gullman, Fredrik Wallin, Åsa Uddheim, Jan-Olof Dalenbäck
Abstract In recent years fuel consumption of passenger vehicles has received increasing attention by customers, the automotive industry, regulatory agencies and academia. However, some areas which affect the fuel consumption have received relatively small interest. One of these areas is the total energy used for vehicle interior climate which can have a large effect on real-world fuel consumption. Although there are several methods described in the literature for analyzing fuel consumption for parts of the climate control system, especially the Air-Condition (AC) system, the total fuel consumption including the vehicle interior climate has often been ignored, both in complete vehicle testing and simulation. The purpose of this research was to develop a model that predicts the total energy use for the vehicle interior climate.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0250
Filip Nielsen, Åsa Uddheim, Jan-Olof Dalenbäck
Abstract In recent years fuel consumption of passenger vehicles has received increasing attention by customers, the automotive industry, regulatory agencies and academia. However, some areas which affect the fuel consumption have received relatively small interest. One of these areas is the total energy used for vehicle interior climate which can have a large effect on real-world fuel consumption. Realistic combinations of energy saving measures were evaluated regarding the total energy use for vehicle interior climate using a one dimensional (1D) simulation model. The 1D simulation model included sub models of the passenger compartment, the air-handling unit, the Air Conditioning (AC) system, engine and engine cooling system. A test cycle representative for real-world conditions was developed. The test cycle included tests in cold, intermediate and warm conditions and the results were weighted with the estimated use in each condition.
2005-05-10
Technical Paper
2005-01-2052
Anders Jönson
This paper describes how simultaneous numerical simulation of cooling performance and aerodynamic drag can be used to achieve attribute-balanced solutions. Traditionally at Volvo, evaluation of cooling performance and aerodynamics are done by separate teams using separate models and software. However, using this approach, any project changes can be evaluated in terms of their effect on cooling performance and drag from one single model. This enables the project to make decisions that are optimal in a more global perspective. If several proposals have similar levels of cooling performance, the proposal that yields the lowest overall drag can be chosen, thus reducing the fuel consumption of the vehicle. The first part of the paper discusses the prerequisites for the method in terms of boundary conditions, mesh and solution strategy. For the cooling performance part, the importance of high quality boundary conditions is reviewed.
2005-05-10
Technical Paper
2005-01-2051
Anders Jerhamre, Rolf Lindén
When designing components, systems and fluid characteristics, thermal loads gathered over the life cycle of an automobile are of great interest. Ageing and deterioration based on the temperature/time distribution that a component or fluid is exposed to, affects the functionality and/or durability of electronics, polymers and lubricants. Optimal design in terms of quality and cost are two of the most governing parameters at Volvo Cars at present. To meet this need, designing terms of life cycles from a thermal perspective has been developed during recent years. This paper presents a methodology for designing components and choosing system solutions from life span thermal loads in Volvo Car's vehicles. The fundamental ideas behind the method, design criteria and examples of usage are discussed from a holistic point of view.
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