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Viewing 1 to 30 of 79
1989-02-01
Technical Paper
890778
Aaron George, Nigel Clark, James Smith, Jonathan Cox
Compression and power stroke cycles for a 4 stroke cycle spark ignition engine modified by extending the connecting rod to simulate purely sinusoidal piston motion are analyzed over a range of operating speeds and are compared with those of a similar conventional engine. Heat release rate is estimated for both engines using a simple Wiebe function with the functional parameters found via a simplex curve fitting method used in conjunction with experimental pressure curves. It is shown that the functional parameters which represent the combustion and the duration of fuel burn are slightly larger over the range of operation in the sinusoidal engine while the shape factor remains largely the same. However, the pressure-crank angle curves are sufficiently similar such that conventional slider-crank curves can be used to model sinusoidal engines, which was the motivation behind this research.
1987-11-08
Technical Paper
871225
James E. Smith, Nigel Clark, Alfred Stiller, Randolph Churchill, A.D. McKisic
With few exceptions most internal combustion engines use a slider-crank mechanism to convert reciprocating piston motion into a usable rotational output. One such exception is the Stiller-Smith Mechanism which utilizes a kinematic inversion of a Scotch yoke called an elliptic trammel. The device uses rigid connecting rods and a floating/eccentric gear train for motion conversion and force transmission. The mechanism exhibits advantages over the slider-crank for application in internal combustion engines in areas such as balancing, size, thermal efficiency, and low heat rejection. An overview of potential advantages of an engine utilizing the Stiller-Smith Mechanism is presented.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1099
Matthew C. Robinson, Nigel Clark
Conventional crank-based engines are limited by mechanical, thermal, and combustion inefficiencies. The free piston of a linear engine generator reduces frictional losses by avoiding the rotational motion and crankshaft linkages. Instead, electrical power is generated by the oscillation of a translator through a linear stator. Because the free piston is not geometrically constrained, dead center positions are not specifically known. This results in a struggle against adverse events like misfire, stall, over-fueling, or rapid load changes. It is the belief that incorporating springs will have the dual benefit of increasing frequency and providing a restoring force to aid in greater cycle to cycle stability. For dual free piston linear engines the addition of springs has not been fully explored, despite growing interest and literature.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3769
Teresa L. Alleman, Robb Barnitt, Leslie Eudy, Matt Miyasato, Adewale Oshinuga, Tom Corcoran, Sougato Chatterjee, Todd Jacobs, Ralph A. Cherrillo, Nigel Clark, W. Scott Wayne
Six 2001 International Class 6 trucks participated in a project to determine the impact of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (DPFs) on emissions and operations from December 2003 through August 2004. The vehicles operated in Southern California and were nominally identical. Three vehicles operated “as-is” on California Air Resources Board (CARB) specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices. Three vehicles were retrofit with Johnson Matthey CCRT® (Catalyzed Continuously Regenerating Technology) filters and fueled with Shell GTL Fuel. Two rounds of emissions tests were conducted on a chassis dynamometer over the City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Route (CSHVR) and the New York City Bus (NYCB) cycle. The CARB-fueled vehicles served as the baseline, while the GTL-fueled vehicles were tested with and without the CCRT filters. Results from the first round of testing have been reported previously (see 2004-01-2959).
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1861
Michael Block, Nigel Clark, Scott Wayne, Ralph Nine, William Miller
Increasingly stringent oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) regulations worldwide have prompted considerable activity in developing emission control technology to reduce the emissions of these two constituents from heavy-duty diesel engines. NOx has come under particular scrutiny by regulators in the US and in Europe with the promulgation of very stringent regulation by both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the European Union (EU). In response, heavy-duty engine manufacturers are considering Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) as a potential NOx reduction option. While SCR performance has been well established through engine dynamometer evaluation under laboratory conditions, there exists little data characterizing SCR performance under real-world operating conditions over time. This project evaluated the field performance of ten SCR units installed on heavy-duty Class 8 highway and refuse trucks.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1085
Marc C. Besch, Joshua Israel, Arvind Thiruvengadam, Hemanth Kappanna, Daniel Carder
Abstract This study was aimed at experimentally investigating the impact of diesel/natural gas (NG) dual-fuel retrofitting onto gaseous emissions emitted by i) legacy, model year (MY) 2005 heavy-duty engines with cooled EGR and no after-treatment system, and ii) a latest technology engine equipped with DPF and urea-SCR after-treatment systems that is compliant with 2010 US-EPA emissions standards. In particular, two different dual-fuel conversion kits were evaluated in this study with pure methane (CH4) being used as surrogate for natural gas. Experiments were conducted on an engine dynamometer over a 13-mode steady-state test cycle as well as the transient FTP required for engine certification while gaseous emissions were sampled through a CVS system. Tailpipe NOx emissions were observed at a comparable level for diesel and diesel/CH4 dual-fuel operation for the 2010 compliant engine downstream the SCR.
2015-03-10
Technical Paper
2015-01-0006
Alberto Boretti, Shuheng Jiang, Joseph Scalzo
Abstract The paper discusses the benefits of a four stroke engine having one intake and one exhaust rotary valve. The rotary valve has a speed of rotation half the crankshaft and defines an open passage that may permit up to extremely sharp opening or closing and very large gas exchange areas. The dual rotary valve design is applied to a racing engine naturally aspirated V-four engine of 1000cc displacement, gasoline fuelled with central direct injection and spark ignition. The engine is then modeled by using a 1D engine & gas dynamics simulation software package to assess the potentials of the solution. The improved design produces much larger power densities than the version of the engines with traditional poppet valves revving at higher speeds, with reduced frictional losses, and with larger gas exchange areas while also improving the fuel conversion efficiency thanks to the sharpness of opening or closing events.
2015-03-10
Technical Paper
2015-01-0009
Bingjie Zhang, Siti Khalijah Mazlan, Shuheng Jiang, Alberto Boretti
Abstract With the purpose of reducing emission level while maintaining the high torque character of diesel engine, various solutions have been proposed by researchers over the world. One of the most attractive methods is to use dual fuel technique with premixed gaseous fuel ignited by a relatively small amount of diesel. In this study, Methane (CH4), which is the main component of natural gas, was premixed with intake air and used as the main fuel, and diesel fuel was used as ignition source to initiate the combustion. By varying the proportion of diesel and CH4, the combustion and emissions characteristics of the dual fuel (diesel/CH4) combustion system were investigated. Different cases of CFD studies with various concentration of CH4 were carried out. A validated 3D quarter chamber model of a single cylinder engine (diesel fuel only) generated by using AVL Fire ESE was modified into dual fuel mode in this study.
2015-03-10
Technical Paper
2015-01-0007
Alberto Boretti, Shuheng Jiang, Joseph Scalzo
Abstract Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicles using a traditional ICE that has been modified to use hydrogen fuel are an important mid-term technology on the path to the hydrogen economy. Hydrogen-powered ICEs that can run on pure hydrogen or a blend of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) are a way of addressing the widespread lack of hydrogen fuelling infrastructure in the near term. Hydrogen-powered ICEs have operating advantages as all weather conditions performances, no warm-up, no cold-start issues and being more fuel efficient than conventional spark-ignition engines. The Wankel engine is one of the best ICE to be converted to run hydrogen. The paper presents some details of an initial investigation of the CAD and CAE modeling of a novel design where two jet ignition devices per rotor are replacing the traditional two spark plugs for a faster and more complete combustion.
2009-11-02
Technical Paper
2009-01-2672
Yuebin Wu, Nigel Clark, Daniel Carder, Benjamin Shade
Dual primary full-flow dilution tunnels represent an integral part of a heavy-duty transportable emissions measurement laboratory designed and constructed to comply with US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 40 Part 1065 requirements. Few data exist to characterize the evolution of particulate matter (PM) in full scale dilution tunnels, particularly at very low PM mass levels. Size distributions of ultra-fine particles in diesel exhaust from a naturally aspirated, 2.4 liter, 40 kW ISUZU C240 diesel engine equipped with a diesel particulate filter (DPF) were studied in one set of standard primary and secondary dilution tunnels with varied dilution ratios. Particle size distribution data, during steady-state engine operation, were collected using a Cambustion DMS500 Fast Particulate Spectrometer. Measurements were made at four positions that spanned the tunnel cross section after the mixing orifice plate for the primary dilution tunnel and at the outlet of the secondary dilution tunnel.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1588
Peter Bonsack, Ross Ryskamp, Marc Besch, Daniel Carder, Mridul Gautam, John Nuszkowski
Abstract Due to tightening emission legislations, both within the US and Europe, including concerns regarding greenhouse gases, next-generation combustion strategies for internal combustion diesel engines that simultaneously reduce exhaust emissions while improving thermal efficiency have drawn increasing attention during recent years. In-cylinder combustion temperature plays a critical role in the formation of pollutants as well as in thermal efficiency of the propulsion system. One way to minimize both soot and NOx emissions is to limit the in-cylinder temperature during the combustion process by means of high levels of dilution via exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) combined with flexible fuel injection strategies. However, fuel chemistry plays a significant role in the ignition delay; hence, influencing the overall combustion characteristics and the resulting emissions.
2013-09-17
Journal Article
2013-01-2304
Richard Brian Cain, Patrick Browning, Wade Huebsch, Jay Wilhelm
Significant efforts have been made in the research of Pulsed Detonation Engines (PDEs) to increase the reliability and longevity of detonation based propulsion systems for use in manned aircraft. However, the efficiency, durability, and low mechanical complexity of PDEs opens up potential for use in disposable unmanned-vehicles. This paper details the steps taken for producing a miniaturized pulse detonation engine at West Virginia University (WVU) to investigate the numerically generated constraining dimensions for Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) cited in this paper. Initial dimensions for the WVU PDE Demonstrator were calculated using fuel specific DDT spatial properties featured in the work of Dr. Phillip Koshy Panicker, of The University of Texas at Arlington. The WVU demonstrator was powered using oxygen and acetylene mixed in stoichiometric proportions.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980489
W. Taylor, W. Kellermeyer, R. Napier, B. Ralston, M. Snoberger, C. M. Atkinson
As a part of the 1996 FutureCar Challenge competition, West Virginia University converted a 1996 Chevrolet Lumina to a series hybrid electric vehicle. This technical report summarizes the modifications made to the vehicle during 1997, the second year of the competition, and details the present state of development of this second-generation hybrid electric vehicle. In particular, the vehicle's powertrain configuration, component selection, control strategy for all modes of operation, emissions control strategies, vehicle structure and design modifications, and suspension design and modifications are all detailed. Also discussed, are the operational use of this vehicle and its intended market. The projected performance of the vehicle, obtained from computer simulations, is discussed in the light of results obtained from testing during 1996 and 1997.
1998-02-23
Technical Paper
980895
W. Scott Wayne, Nigel N. Clark, Christopher M. Atkinson
Until a proper fueling infrastructure is established, vehicles powered by natural gas must have bi-fuel capability in order to avoid a limited vehicle range. Although bi-fuel conversions of existing gasoline engines have existed for a number of years, these engines do not fully exploit the combustion and knock properties of both fuels. Much of the power loss resulting from operation of an existing gasoline engine on compressed natural gas (CNG) can be recovered by increasing the compression ratio, thereby exploiting the high knock resistance of natural gas. However, gasoline operation at elevated compression ratios results in severe engine knock. The use of variable intake valve timing in conjunction with ignition timing modulation and electronically controlled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was investigated as a means of controlling knock when operating a bi-fuel engine on gasoline at elevated compression ratios.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950468
Christopher M. Atkinson, Michael L. Traver, Christopher J. Tennant, Richard J. Atkinson, Nigel N. Clark
A Saturn 1.9 liter engine has been converted for operation on either compressed natural gas or gasoline. A bi-fuel controller (BFC) that uses closed-loop control methods for both fuel delivery and spark advance has been developed. The performance and emissions during operation on each fuel have been investigated with the BFC, as well as the performance and emissions with the stock original equipment manufacturer (OEM) controller using gasoline. In-cylinder pressure was measured at a rate of 1024 points per revolution with piezoelectric pressure transducers flush-mounted in the cylinder head. The in-cylinder pressure was used in real time for ignition timing control purposes, and was stored by a data acquisition system for the investigation of engine stability and differences in the combustion properties of the fuels.
1998-10-19
Technical Paper
982688
Yasser Yacoub, Chris Atkinson
A conceptual understanding of modularity in internal combustion engines (defined as design, operation, and sensing on an individual cylinder basis) is presented. Three fundamental modular concepts are identified. These are dissimilar component sizing and operation, component deactivation, and direct sensing. The implementation of these concepts in spark ignition internal combustion engines is presented. Several modular approaches are reviewed with respect to breathing, fueling, power generation, and sensing. These include dissimilar orientation, geometry, and activation of multiple induction runners, partial or total disablement of valves through direct or indirect means, dissimilar fueling of individual cylinders, skipping the combustion event of one or more cylinders, deactivation of dissimilar individual cylinders or a group of cylinders, and individual cylinder gas pressure and mixture strength sensing.
1998-10-19
Technical Paper
982533
W. Scott Wayne, Nigel N. Clark, Christopher M. Atkinson
Dedicated natural gas engines suffer the disadvantages of limited vehicle range and relatively few refueling stations. A vehicle capable of operating on either gasoline or natural gas allows alternative fuel usage without sacrificing vehicle range and mobility. However, the bi-fuel engine must be made to provide equal performance on both fuels. Although bi-fuel conversions have existed for a number of years, historically natural gas performance is degraded relative to gasoline due to reduced volumetric efficiency and lower power density of CNG. Much of the performance losses associated with CNG can be overcome by increasing the compression ratio. However, in a bi-fuel application, high compression ratios can result in severe engine knock during gasoline operation. Variable intake valve timing, increased exhaust gas recirculation and retarded ignition timing were explored as a means of controlling knock during gasoline operation of a bi-fuel engine.
1998-05-04
Technical Paper
981406
M. Gautam, M. Durbha, K. Chitoor, M. Jaraiedi, N. Mariwalla, Dave Ripple
Among the key technologies currently being used for reducing emissions of oxides of nitrogen, Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) has been found to be very effective for light duty diesel engines. However, EGR results in a sharp increase in particulate matter emissions in heavy-duty diesel engines. The presence of increased levels of particulate matter in the engine has led to increased wear of engine parts such as cylinder liners, piston rings, valve train system and bearings. A statistically designed experiment was developed to examine the effects of soot contaminated engine oil on wear of engine components. A three-body wear machine was designed and developed to simulate and estimate the extent of wear. The three oil properties studied were phosphorous level, dispersant level and sulfonate substrate level. The above three variables were formulated at two levels: High (1) and Low (-1). This resulted in a 23 matrix (8 oil blends).
1998-05-04
Technical Paper
981395
Sumit Bhargava, Nigel N. Clark, M. Wayne Hildebrand
Lean-burn natural gas engines offer attractively low particulate matter emissions and enjoy higher efficiencies than their stoichiometric counterparts. However, even though oxides of nitrogen emissions can be reduced through operation at lambda ratios of greater than 1.3, catalysts cannot reduce the oxides of nitrogen emissions in the oxidizing exhaust environment. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) offers the potential to reduce engine out oxides of nitrogen emissions by reducing the flame temperature and oxygen partial pressure that encourages their formation during the combustion process. A comparative study involving a change in the nature of primary diluent (air replaced by EGR) in the intake of a Hercules, 3.7 liter, lean-burn natural gas engine has been undertaken in this research. The Hercules engine was equipped with a General Motors electronically controlled EGR valve for low EGR rates, and a slide valve, constructed in house, for high EGR rates.
1998-05-04
Technical Paper
981393
Nigel N. Clark, Donald W. Lyons, Byron L. Rapp, Mridul Gautam, Wenguang Wang, Paul Norton, Charles White, Kevin Chandler
Both field research and certification data show that the lean burn natural gas powered spark ignition engines offer particulate matter (PM) reduction with respect to equivalent diesel power plants. Concerns over PM inventory make these engines attractive despite the loss of fuel economy associated with throttled operation. Early versions of the Cummins L-10 natural gas engines employed a mixer to establish air/fuel ratio. Emissions measurements by the West Virginia University Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratories on Cummins L-10 powered transit buses revealed the potential to offer low emissions of PM and oxides of nitrogen, (NOx) but variations in the mixture could cause emissions of NOx, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons to rise. This was readily corrected through mixer repair or readjustment. Newer versions of the L-10 engine employ a more sophisticated fueling scheme with feedback control from a wide range oxygen sensor.
1998-05-04
Technical Paper
981392
Kevin Chandler, Paul Norton, Nigel Clark
The objective of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty trucks operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Data collection from up to eight sites is planned. This paper summarizes the design of the project and early results from the first two sites. Data collection is planned for operations, maintenance, truck system descriptions, emissions, duty cycle, safety incidents, and capital costs and operating costs associated with the use of alternative fuels in trucking.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3787
Mohan Krishnamurthy, Mridul Gautam
Certification of heavy-duty diesel requires engines to be tested on an engine dynamometer and meet certification in accordance with specific procedures and cycles. However, real-world emissions have been observed to be significantly different from in-laboratory testing. The brake-specific emissions from vehicles are influenced by various operating parameters such as engine speed, load, traffic flow and ambient conditions, hence, vary from the values obtained from the certification tests. In the future, US EPA and other state regulating bodies will require the engine manufacturers to measure in-use emissions from vehicles operating under “real-world” operating conditions. A test vehicle instrumented with West Virginia University's (WVU) Mobile Emissions Measurement System (MEMS), a portable onboard tailpipe emissions measurement system, was used to obtain engine operating conditions, vehicle speed and in-use emission rates of CO2 and NOx.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0256
Andrew D. Lowery, Franz A. Pertl, James E. Smith
Current research has involved manipulating the ignition inside of the combustion chamber. It has been demonstrated that an RF plasma flame can be generated from microwaves in a Quarter Wave Coaxial Cavity Resonator (QWCCR). By using this method, it may become possible for researchers to improve combustion and ignition characteristics of a modern internal combustion engine. Filling a plasma cavity with an appropriate dielectric medium can both alter electromagnetic properties and provide a suitable protective barrier to the harsh condition inside of a combustion cylinder. It is the purpose of this paper is to investigate both the operating frequency and quality factor of dielectric-filled cavities, as well as to suggest dielectrics that would be suitable for such an application.
2006-11-07
Technical Paper
2006-01-3064
Paul J. Kreitzer, Shannon L. Glaspell, John M. Kuhlman, Deepak Mehra, Donald D. Gray
Initial results are reported for the effects of electrical body forces on heat transfer performance of an instrumented spray cooling experiment. Heat transfer performance is documented for ranges of electrode voltage, spray volume flow rate, and heater power level using a Thick Film Resistor heater. The heat transfer coefficient increases with increased spray flow rate, and also increases somewhat versus heat flux. Without the electrical body forces, different brass and PVC spray nozzles show significant variation in spray cooling performance (order of ±5-15%) whenever the nozzle is realigned. Changing the nozzle-to-heater spacing results in similar performance variations. Initial Kelvin force electrode designs show no improvement in heat transfer performance using FC-72, while a Coulomb force electrode geometry and a second-generation Kelvin force electrode design both show modest but consistent improvements (order of 10% in heat flux; order of 5% for Nusselt number) using HFE-7000.
2003-11-10
Technical Paper
2003-01-3366
Kevin Walkowicz, Ken Proc, Scott Wayne, Ralph Nine, Kevin Campbell, Greg Wiedemeier
Emissions from 10 refuse trucks equipped with Caterpillar C-10 engines were measured on West Virginia University's (WVU) Transportable Emissions Laboratory in Riverside, California. The engines all used a commercially available Dual-Fuel™ natural gas (DFNG) system supplied by Clean Air Partners Inc. (CAP), and some were also equipped with catalyzed particulate filters (CPFs), also from CAP. The DFNG system introduces natural gas with the intake air and then ignites the gas with a small injection of diesel fuel directly into the cylinder to initiate combustion. Emissions were measured over a modified version of a test cycle (the William H. Martin cycle) previously developed by WVU. The cycle attempts to duplicate a typical curbside refuse collection truck and includes three modes: highway-to-landfill delivery, curbside collection, and compaction. Emissions were compared to similar trucks that used Caterpillar C-10 diesels equipped with Engelhard's DPX catalyzed particulate filters.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-3206
Gregory J. Thompson, Zenovy S. Wowczuk, James E. Smith
The basic design of a purely rotary motion engine has potentially many advantages over the conventional piston-crank internal combustion engine. Although only one rotary engine has been successfully placed into production, rotary mechanisms still show promise in the market place. A comprehensive review of rotary engine concepts is presented with an emphasis placed on the last 30 years. Suggestions are made as to where research concentrations should be placed to improve the progress of a rotary engine.
2004-10-25
Technical Paper
2004-01-2904
Nigel Clark, Mridul Gautam, W. Scott Wayne, Wesley Riddle, Ralph D. Nine, Donald W. Lyons, Shuhong Xu
Repeatable measurement of real-world heavy-duty diesel truck emissions requires the use of a chassis dynamometer with a test schedule that reasonably represents actual truck use. A new Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) schedule has been created that consists of four modes, termed Idle, Creep, Transient and Cruise. The effect of driving style on emissions from the Transient Mode was studied by driving a 400 hp Mack tractor at 56,000 lbs. test weight in fashions termed “Medium”, “Good”, “Bad”, “Casual” and “Aggressive”. Although there were noticeable differences in the actual speed vs. time trace for these five styles, emissions of the important species oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM), varied little with a coefficient of variation (COV) of 5.13% on NOX and 10.68% on PM. Typical NOx values for the HHDDT Transient mode ranged from 19.9 g/mile to 22.75 g/mile. The Transient mode which was the most difficult mode to drive, proved to be repeatable.
2004-10-25
Technical Paper
2004-01-2959
Teresa L. Alleman, Leslie Eudy, Matt Miyasato, Adewale Oshinuga, Scott Allison, Tom Corcoran, Sougato Chatterjee, Todd Jacobs, Ralph A. Cherrillo, Richard Clark, Ian Virrels, Ralph Nine, Scott Wayne, Ron Lansing
A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT™ diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made. Bench scale fuel-engine compatibility testing showed the GTL fuel had cold flow properties suitable for year-round use in southern California and was additized to meet current lubricity standards. Bench scale elastomer compatibility testing returned results similar to those of CARB specification diesel fuel. The GTL fuel met or exceeded ASTM D975 fuel properties. Researchers used a chassis dynamometer to test emissions over the City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Route (CSHVR) and New York City Bus (NYCB) cycles.
2004-10-25
Technical Paper
2004-01-2956
S. R. Munshi, C. Nedelcu, J. Harris, T. Edwards, J. Williams, F. Lynch, M. Frailey, G. Dixon, S. Wayne, R. Nine
A turbocharged lean burn natural gas engine was upgraded to operate on a blend of hydrogen and natural gas (HCNG). Tests were carried out to determine the most suitable H2/NG blend for H2 fractions between 20 and 32 vol%. A 20 vol% H2 content was found to provide the desired benefits when taking into consideration the engine and vehicle performance attributes. A full engine map was developed for the chosen mixture, and was verified over the steady-state AVL8 cycle. In general, the HCNG calibration included operation at higher air-fuel ratios and retarded spark timings. The results indicated that the NOx and NMHC emissions were reduced by 50% and 58% respectively, while the CO and CH4 emissions were slightly reduced. The HCNG engine torque, power and fuel consumption were maintained the same as for the natural gas fuel. The chassis dynamometer transient testing confirmed large NOx reduction of about 56% for HCNG operation.
2003-09-16
Technical Paper
2003-32-0037
Gerald M. Angle, Wade W. Huebsch
For any high performance vehicle the aerodynamic properties are significant when attempting to optimize performance. For ground vehicles the major aerodynamic forces are drag and down-force. The focus of this research was to determine the feasibility of vortex generation as a method to reduce the aerodynamic drag of a racing class motorcycle. Wind tunnel tests were performed on a full-scale racing motorcycle in the Closed Loop Tunnel (CLT) at West Virginia University (WVU) and in Old Dominion University's (ODU) Langley Full Scale Tunnel (LFST) at various airspeeds. Counter-rotating vortices were generated using small commercially available vortex generators (VGs). The largest reduction in drag was 10%, which was measured in the WVU CLT. The LFST tests showed no measurable increase or decrease in drag. This led to the conclusion that the airspeed and test section blockage ratio influenced the optimum configuration and size of the vortex generators.
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