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Viewing 1 to 18 of 18
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0901
Ali Fatemi, Steve Mellot, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Charles Buehler
Abstract An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate tensile and fatigue behaviors of two thermoplastics, a neat impact polypropylene and a mineral and elastomer reinforced polyolefin. Tensile tests were performed at various strain rates at room, −40°C, and 85°C temperatures with specimens cut parallel and perpendicular to the mold flow direction. Tensile properties were determined from these tests and mathematical relations were developed to represent tensile properties as a function of strain rate and temperature. For fatigue behavior, the effects considered include mold flow direction, mean stress, and temperature. Tension-compression as well as tension-tension load-controlled fatigue tests were performed at room temperature, −40°C and 85°C. The effect of mean stress was modeled using the Walker mean stress model and a simple model with a mean stress sensitivity factor.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0544
Nicholas Meyer, Ali Fatemi, Steven McCutcheon, Brian Havard, William Fairchilds
Abstract With improvements in casting technology, cast iron can be an alternative to steel in some applications due to its similar strength. One objective of this study was to analyze cast iron data obtained from the literature and evaluate predictive correlations between its tensile, microstructural, and fatigue properties. Reasonably good correlation of tensile strength and yield strength were found with hardness. However, fatigue strength could not be correlated with hardness or tensile properties. Another objective of this study was to evaluate tensile and compressive means stress effects on fatigue behavior of 120-90-02 ductile cast iron experimentally, as well as analytically by using predictive models. Mean stress levels were chosen such that R ratios in load-controlled tests were −7, −3, −1, 0, 1/3, 0.5, and 0.75. Modified Goodman, Smith-Watson-Topper, FKM and the Fatemi-Socie mean stress parameters were used to account for the mean stress effect on fatigue life.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0546
Seyyedvahid Mortazavian, Ali Fatemi, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh
Abstract An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the effect of water absorption on tensile and fatigue behaviors of an impact-modified short glass fiber polyamide-6 and a short glass fiber polybutylene terephthalate. Specimens were prepared in the longitudinal and transverse directions with respect to the injection mold flow direction and immersed in water. Kinetics of water absorption was studied and found to follow the Fick's law. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature with specimens in the longitudinal and transverse directions and with various degrees of water absorption. Mathematical relations were developed to represent tensile properties as a function of water content. Load-controlled tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted in both longitudinal and transverse directions and correlations between tensile and fatigue strengths were obtained.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1009
Touhid Zarrin-Ghalami, Ali Fatemi, Yung-Li Lee
Elastomers have large reversible elastic deformation, good damping and high energy absorption capabilities. Due to these characteristics along with low cost of manufacturing, elastomeric components are widely used in many industries and applications, including in automobiles. These components are typically subjected to complex multiaxial and variable amplitude cyclic loads during their service life. Therefore, fatigue failure and life prediction are important issues in the design and analyses of these components. Availability of an effective CAE technique to evaluate fatigue damage and to predict fatigue life under complex loading conditions is a valuable tool for such analysis. This paper discusses a general CAE analytical technique for durability analysis and life prediction of elastomeric components. The methodology is then illustrated and verified by using experimental fatigue test results from an automobile cradle mount.
1993-03-01
Technical Paper
930119
Harry Willis, Ali Fatemi
The work presented here experimentally analyzes the compaction behavior of a thin graphite facing gasket material utilizing a new patented lateral displacement fixture. Two constitutive relationships are presented to describe the measured material characteristics, using this new fixture system. The first approach is a more conventional method of taking the load-deformation curve of the material to analyze the stress-strain relationship. The second approach develops the stress-strain relationship using a soils model. The soils model relates the true axial stress to the volumetric strain. The constitutive relationships account for thickness, shape, and surface friction condition variations of the material. To study these variabilities, three thicknesses, two diameters, and two surface friction conditions were considered.
1996-02-01
Technical Paper
960308
Linsheng Yang, Ali Fatemi, Don A. Rhoda, James E. Tripp
Microalloyed (MA) steels have been developed as one of the most significant metallurgical advances over the last thirty years, with their property improvement and cost effectiveness characteristics. Even though the underlying principles for microstructural property control of these steels have been well established, applications of these steels are still limited in scale mainly due to a lack of their understanding. This review paper focuses on mechanical property control of these steels. Since the properties depend mainly on the composition and microstructure which in turn are controlled by steel making and processing, metallurgical variables are reviewed in this first part of the review. These include their strengthening mechanisms, effects of composition and processing on their behavior, and the various MA steel microstructures.
1996-02-01
Technical Paper
960309
Linsheng Yang, Ali Fatemi, Don A. Rhoda, James E. Tripp
Microalloyed (MA) steels have been developed as economical alternatives to the traditional quenched and tempered (QT) steels. The physical metallurgy principles underlying their basic composition-processing-microstructure-property interrelationships have been reviewed in the first part of the review. In this second part of the review, mechanical properties as well as fabrication properties, such as mahinability, weldability, and formability, are discussed. Flat products (such as strips, sheets, and plates), long products (including bars, rods, sections/profiles), and forging articles made of MA steels are investigated. Since most engineering components made of these steels are subjected to cyclic loading, fatigue and fracture performance of MA steels and their comparison with the QT steels are also evaluated in this review.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1529
Adila Afzal, Ali Fatemi
This study investigates and compares fatigue behavior of forged steel and powder metal connecting rods. The experiments included strain-controlled specimen testing, with specimens obtained from the connecting rods, as well as load-controlled connecting rod bench testing. Monotonic and cyclic deformation behaviors, as well as strain-controlled fatigue properties of the two materials are evaluated and compared. Experimental S-N curves of the two connecting rods from the bench tests obtained under R = -1.25 constant amplitude loading conditions are also evaluated and compared. Fatigue properties obtained from specimen testing are then used in life predictions of the connecting rods, using the S-N approach. The predicted lives are compared with bench test results and include the effects of stress concentration, surface finish, and mean stress. The stress concentration factors were obtained from FEA, and the modified Goodman equation was used to account for the mean stress effect.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0987
Pravardhan S. Shenoy, Ali Fatemi
An optimization study was performed on a steel forged connecting rod with a consideration for improvement in weight and production cost. Since the weight of the connecting rod has little influence on its total production cost, the cost and the weight were dealt with separately. Reduction in machining operations, achieved by change in material, was a significant factor in manufacturing cost reduction. Weight reduction was achieved by using an iterative procedure. Literature survey suggests cyclic loads comprised of static tensile and compressive loads are often used for design and optimization of connecting rods. However, in this study weight optimization is performed under a cyclic load comprising dynamic tensile load and static compressive load as the two extreme loads. Constraints of fatigue strength, static strength, buckling resistance and manufacturability were also imposed. The fatigue strength was the most significant factor in the optimization of the connecting rod.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0628
Mehrdad Zoroufi, Ali Fatemi
A vehicle steering knuckle undergoes time-varying loadings during its service life. Fatigue behavior is, therefore, a key consideration in its design and performance evaluation. This research program aimed to assess fatigue life and compare fatigue performance of steering knuckles made from three materials of different manufacturing processes. These include forged steel, cast aluminum, and cast iron knuckles. In light of the high volume of forged steel vehicle components, the forging process was considered as base for investigation. Monotonic and strain-controlled fatigue tests of specimens machined from the three knuckles were conducted. Static as well as baseline cyclic deformation and fatigue properties were obtained and compared. In addition, a number of load-controlled fatigue component tests were conducted for the forged steel and cast aluminum knuckles. Finite element models of the steering knuckles were also analyzed to obtain stress distributions in each component.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0434
Nisha Cyril, Ali Fatemi, Bob Cryderman
During metal forming processes such as rolling and forging, deformable manganese sulfide (MnS) inclusions become elongated. Such elongated MnS inclusions can have considerable adverse effects on mechanical properties, if the inclusions are not aligned with the loading direction. The objectives of this study were to evaluate and compare fatigue, monotonic tensile and CVN impact behavior of SAE 4140 steel with high (0.077% S), low (0.012% S) and ultra low (0.004% S) sulfur contents at two hardness levels (40 HRC and 50 HRC). The longitudinally oriented samples at 40 HRC, where MnS inclusions were oriented along the loading direction, did not exhibit any significant sensitivity of tensile or fatigue properties to the sulfur content. For the transversely oriented MnS inclusions, however, the monotonic tensile test results indicate very low ductility of the high sulfur material at both hardness levels, where specimens failed shortly after yielding.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0432
Farzin H. Montazersadgh, Ali Fatemi
In this study a dynamic simulation was conducted on a forged steel crankshaft from a single cylinder four stroke engine. Finite element analysis was performed to obtain the variation of the stress magnitude at critical locations. The dynamic analysis resulted in the development of the load spectrum applied to the crankpin bearing. This load was then applied to the FE model and boundary conditions were applied according to the engine mounting conditions. Results obtained from the aforementioned analysis were then used in optimization of the forged steel crankshaft. Geometry, material, and manufacturing processes were optimized using different geometric constraints, manufacturing feasibility, and cost. The first step in the optimization process was weight reduction of the component considering dynamic loading. This required the stress range under dynamic loading not to exceed the magnitude of the stress range in the original crankshaft.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1001
Jonathan Williams, Ali Fatemi
Fatigue is the primary cause of failure of crankshafts in internal combustion engines. The cyclic loading conditions and the stress concentrations in the crank pin fillets are unavoidable, and can result in fatigue failure. The objectives of this study were to compare the fatigue behavior of forged steel and ductile iron crankshafts from a one-cylinder engine as well as to determine if the fatigue life of a crankshaft can be accurately estimated using fatigue life predictions. Monotonic tensile tests as well as strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted using specimens machined from the crankshafts to obtain the monotonic and cyclic deformation behavior and fatigue properties of the two materials. The forged steel had higher tensile strength and better fatigue performance than the ductile cast iron. Charpy v-notch impact tests were also conducted using specimens machined from the crankshafts to obtain and compare the impact toughness of the materials.
2009-04-20
Journal Article
2009-01-0422
Sean McKelvey, Ali Fatemi, Steve McCutcheon
This paper discusses the effects of changes in specimen geometry, stress gradient, and residual stresses on fully-reversed constant amplitude uniaxial fatigue behavior of a medium carbon steel. Axial fatigue tests were performed on both flat and round specimens, while four-point rotating bending tests were performed only on round specimens. All the tests were performed using shot peened and unpeened flat and round samples, to investigate the effects of compressive residual stresses on fatigue behavior. The specimens in the rotating bending tests experienced longer life for a given stress amplitude than in the axial test. Shot-peening was found to be beneficial in the long life region, while in short life tests the shot-peened samples experienced a shorter life than the unpeened samples under both axial and bending test conditions.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0488
Sean Mckelvey, Ali Fatemi
Fatigue fractures are the most common type of mechanical failures of components and structures. It is widely recognized that surface finish has a significant effect on fatigue behavior. Forgings can be accompanied by significant surface roughness and decarburization. The correction factors used in many mechanical design textbooks to correct for the as-forged surface condition are typically based on data published in the 1940's. It has been found by several investigators that the existing data for as-forged surface condition is too conservative. Such conservative values often result in over-engineered designs of many forged parts, leading not only to increased cost, but also inefficiencies associated with increased weight, such as increased fuel consumption in the automotive industry. In addition, this can reduce forging competitiveness as a manufacturing process in terms of cost and performance prediction in the early design stage, compared to alternative manufacturing processes.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0487
Nima Shamsaei, Ali Fatemi
A procedure for fatigue life estimation of components and structures under variable amplitude multiaxial loadings based on simple and commonly available material properties is presented. Different aspects of the analysis consisting of load cycle counting method, plasticity model, fatigue damage parameter, and cumulative damage rule are presented. The only needed material properties for the proposed procedure are hardness and monotonic and axial cyclic deformation properties (HB, K, n, K′ and n′). Rainflow cycle counting method is used for identifying number of cycles. Non-proportional cyclic hardening is estimated from monotonic and axial cyclic deformation behaviors. A critical plane approach is used to quantify fatigue damage under variable amplitude multiaxial loading, where only material hardness is used to estimate the fatigue curve, and where the needed deformation response is estimated based on Tanaka's non-proportionality parameter.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0373
Mohammadreza Eftekhari, Ali Fatemi, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh
Abstract An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the variable amplitude fatigue behavior of a neat polymer (polypropylene impact co-polymer) and a polymer composite made of polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) with 30 wt% short glass fibers. Fatigue tests were conducted on un-notched and notched specimens at room temperatures. Plate-type specimens were prepared in the transverse direction with respect to the injection mold flow direction and a circular hole was drilled in the center of notched specimens. Two-step loadings (high-low and low-high) tests at two damage ratio of 0.2 and 0.5 at stress ratios of R = 0.1 and -1 were conducted to investigate load sequence effects and prediction accuracy of the linear damage rule. Different behaviors were observed for unreinforced and short glass fiber reinforced polymers under the two-step loading tests.
1999-03-01
Technical Paper
1999-01-0364
Matthew L. Roessle, Ali Fatemi, Abolhassan K. Khosrovaneh
The strain-life approach is now commonly used for fatigue life analysis and predictions in the ground vehicle industry. This approach requires the use of material properties obtained from strain-controlled uniaxial fatigue tests. These properties include fatigue strength coefficient (σf′), fatigue strength exponent (b), fatigue ductility coefficient (εf′), fatigue ductility exponent (c), cyclic strength coefficient (K′), and cyclic strain hardening exponent (n′). To obtain the aforementioned properties for the material, raw data from stable cyclic stress-strain loops are fitted in log-log scale. These data include total, elastic and plastic strain amplitudes, stress amplitude, and fatigue life. Values of the low cycle fatigue properties (σf′, b, εf′, c) determined from the raw data depend on the method of measurement and fitting. This paper examines the merits and influence of using different measurement and fitting methods on the obtained properties.
Viewing 1 to 18 of 18

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