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CURRENT
2005-01-05
Standard
AIR4985
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to present a quantitative approach for evaluating the performance and capabilities of an Engine Monitoring System (EMS). The value of such a methodology is in providing a systematic means to accomplish the following: Determine the impact of an EMS on key engine supportability indices such as Fault Detection Rate, Fault Isolation Rate, Mean Time to Diagnose, In-flight Shutdowns (IFSD), Mission Aborts, and Unscheduled Engine Removals (UERs). Facilitate trade studies during the design process in order to compare performance versus cost for various EMS design strategies, and Define a “common language” for specifying EMS requirements and the design features of an EMS in order to reduce ambiguity and, therefore, enhance consistency between specification and implementation.
HISTORICAL
2006-11-15
Standard
AIR5120
For Engine Monitoring Systems to meet their potential for improved safety and reduced operation and support costs, significant attention must be focused on their reliability and validity throughout the life cycle. This AIR will provide program managers, designers, developers and customers a concise reference of the activities, approaches and considerations for the development and verification of a highly reliable engine monitoring system. When applying the guidelines of this AIR it should be noted that engine monitoring systems physically or functionally integrated with the engine control system and/or performing functions that affect engine safety or are used to effect continued operation or return to service decisions shall be subject to the Type Investigation of the product in which they'll be incorporated and have to show compliance with the applicable airworthiness requirements as defined by the responsible Aviation Authority.
HISTORICAL
1999-03-01
Standard
AIR4986
Turbine engine malfunctions account for a substantial portion of the maintenance actions required to keep both fixed and rotary wing aircraft operational. Undetected incipient component failures can result in secondary engine damage and expensive unscheduled maintenance actions. Recent developments of electrostatic methods now provide the potential for the detection of foreign object ingestion and early detection of distress in gas path components. This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) seeks to outline the history of the electrostatic technique and provides examples of state-of-the-art systems for both inlet and exhaust gas debris monitoring systems along with examples of most recent testing.
CURRENT
2009-10-28
Standard
AIR4986A
Turbine engine malfunctions account for a substantial portion of the maintenance actions required to keep both fixed and rotary wing aircraft operational. Undetected incipient component failures can result in secondary engine damage and expensive unscheduled maintenance actions. Recent developments of electrostatic methods now provide the potential for the detection of foreign object ingestion and early detection of distress in gas path components. This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) seeks to outline the history of the electrostatic technique and provides examples of state-of-the-art systems for both inlet and exhaust gas debris monitoring systems along with examples of most recent testing.
2017-01-24
WIP Standard
AIR7999
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) presents metrics for assessing the performance of diagnostic and prognostic algorithms applied to Engine Health Management (EHM) functions. This document consolidates and expands upon the metric information previously contained in AIR4985 and AIR5909. The emphasis is entirely on metrics and as such is intended to provide an extension and complement to such documents as ARP4176, which provides insight into how to create a cost benefit analysis to determine the justification for implementing an EHM system.
CURRENT
2013-02-05
Standard
ARP4176
This ARP provides an insight into how to approach a cost benefit analysis (CBA) to determine the return on investment (ROI) that would result from implementing a propulsion Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) system on an air vehicle. It describes the complexity of features that can be considered in the analysis, the different tools and approaches for conducting a CBA and differentiates between military and commercial applications. This document is intended to help those who might not necessarily have a deep technical understanding or familiarity with PHM systems but want to either quantify or understand the economic benefits (i.e., the value proposition) that a PHM system could provide.
CURRENT
1996-06-01
Standard
ARP485A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines the nomenclature of temperature measuring devices. General temperature measurement related terms are defined first, followed by nomenclature specific to temperature measuring devices, particularly thermocouples.
HISTORICAL
1992-02-01
Standard
ARP465A
CURRENT
1996-06-01
Standard
ARP465B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidance for the design of flanges on temperature sensors intended for use in gas turbine engines. Three figures detail the configuration of standard size flange mounts with bolt holes, slotted flanges, and miniaturized flanges for small probes.
CURRENT
1958-02-15
Standard
ARP464
HISTORICAL
1968-02-01
Standard
ARP465
CURRENT
2016-11-29
Standard
AIR1873A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) describes a Limited Engine Monitoring System that can be used by the flight crew or the maintenance staff, or both, to monitor the health of gas turbine engines in aircraft. This AIR considers monitoring of gas path performance and mechanical parameters, and systems such as low cycle fatigue counters and engine history recorders. It also considers typical measurement system accuracies and their impact. This AIR is intended as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. AIR 1873 supplements ARP 1587, Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Monitoring System Guide.
HISTORICAL
2001-07-01
Standard
AIR1839B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development.
HISTORICAL
2008-02-16
Standard
AIR1839C
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
CURRENT
2005-06-27
Standard
AIR1828B
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of lubrication system monitoring methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices that can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance.
HISTORICAL
1984-03-01
Standard
AIR1828
The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of oil system monitoring devices and methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices which can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance. In agreement with industry usage, wear particle size ranges are given in μm (1 μm = 10-3 millimeter = 10-6 meter). Other dimensions are given in millimeters, with inches in parenthesis.
HISTORICAL
1992-01-22
Standard
AIR1828A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of oil system monitoring devices and methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices that can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance. In agreement with industry usage, wear particle size ranges are given in micrometers (1 μm = 10-3 mm = 10-6 m).
HISTORICAL
1992-03-10
Standard
AIR1839A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne vibration monitoring (AVM) systems with an emphasis on system hardware design considerations. It describes AVM systems currently in use. The purpose of this AIR is to provide information and guidance for the selection, installation, and use of AVM systems and their elements. This AIR is not intended as a legal document but only as a technical guide.
HISTORICAL
1992-02-01
Standard
AIR1839
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
HISTORICAL
2002-03-06
Standard
AIR4174
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide management, designers, and operators with information to assist them to decide what type of power train monitoring they desire. This document is to provide assistance in optimizing system complexity, performance and cost effectiveness. This document covers all power train elements from the point at which the gas generator energy is transferred to mechanical energy for propulsion purposes. The document covers engine power train components, their interfaces, transmissions, gearboxes, hanger bearings, shafting and associated rotating accessories, propellers and rotor systems as shown in Figure 1. This document addresses application for rotorcraft, turboprop, and propfan drive trains for both commercial and military aircraft.
CURRENT
2016-11-12
Standard
AIR4175B
An effective GSS is vital to the successful implementation of an EMS and is a fundamental part of the total monitoring system design, including asset management. Unlike the on-board part of the EMS which principally uses real time data to indicate when engine maintenance is required, a GSS can offer much greater processing power to comprehensively analyze and manipulate EMS data for both maintenance and logistics purposes. This document reviews the main EMS functions and discusses the operating requirements used to determine the basis design of a GSS, including the interfaces with other maintenance or logistic systems. A brief discussion is also included on some of the more recent advances in GSS technology that have been specifically developed to provide more effective diagnostic capabilities for gas turbine engines.
HISTORICAL
2001-09-01
Standard
AS4831
To establish a specification for software input and output interfaces for condition monitoring and performance programs used to monitor equipment from multiple manufacturers. The purpose of standardizing these interfaces is to improve operational flexibility and efficiency of monitoring systems as an aid to cost effectiveness (e.g., easier implementation).
CURRENT
1964-08-01
Standard
ARP691
The ice bath recommended herein is similar to that described in SAE AIR 46.* Some material not presented in AIR 46, including preferred dimensions, has been added.
CURRENT
1964-08-01
Standard
ARP690
The thermocouple design recommended herein is presented as one for which the correction to the observed emf, because of thermal conduction along the stem and wires, is within the limits presented in the accompanying figure. On referring to the figure, it is seen that no restriction is placed upon the diameter of the thermocouple or stem, and the longitudinal dimensions are expressed in terms of wire and stem diameters. The type of stem, such as packed ceramic stock, refractory insulating tubing, etc., also is left open to choice. Thus the sizes of wires and supporting stems may be varied over wide ranges to match particular requirements where conduction errors are to be limited or controlled.
HISTORICAL
1996-05-01
Standard
AS8054
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides guidelines for the functional, performance, qualification and acceptance testing, and documentation requirements for the components of an airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) system which is intended for use as a turbojet engine rotor unbalance indicating system, per FAR 25.1305 (D)(3) on transport category airplanes. For the purpose of this document, this means a system which can provide real-time flight deck displays of engine vibration caused by rotor unbalance, throughout the flight envelope, which are suitable for: a. relating to engine vibration limits (where such limits are specified), b. use in ice shedding procedures, and c. helping the flight crew to determine which engine has the higher level of vibration, following an engine damage event.
CURRENT
2012-05-31
Standard
AS8054A
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides guidelines for the functional, performance, qualification and acceptance testing, and documentation requirements for the components of an airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) system which is intended for use as a turbojet engine rotor unbalance indicating system, per FAR 25.1305 (D)(3) on transport category airplanes.
Viewing 1 to 27 of 27