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HISTORICAL
2008-02-14
Standard
AIR4061B
SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) 4061 provides best practice guidelines for the integration of Engine Health Management (EHM) system functions within aircraft systems to include both its main engine(s) and any Auxiliary Power Unit(s) (APU). This document provides an overview of some of the functions EHM typically integrates, offers some system variations encountered with different aircraft, and suggests general considerations involved with integration. It presents a sample EHM parameter coverage matrix to show the types of parameters with which a typical EHM system might interface, offers insight into signal and data processing and retrieval, and offers a view of typical EHM parameter requirements by function. Where practical, this document delineates between military and commercial practices.
CURRENT
2016-11-12
Standard
AIR4061C
SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) 4061 provides best practice guidelines for the integration of Engine Health Management (EHM) system functions within aircraft systems to include both its main engine(s) and any Auxiliary Power Unit(s) (APU). This document provides an overview of some of the functions EHM typically integrates, offers some system variations encountered with different aircraft, and suggests general considerations involved with integration. It presents a sample EHM parameter coverage matrix to show the types of parameters with which a typical EHM system might interface, offers insight into signal and data processing and retrieval, and offers a view of typical EHM parameter requirements by function. Where practical, this document delineates between military and commercial practices.
HISTORICAL
1990-01-01
Standard
AIR4061
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) discusses physical and functional integration of main engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) monitoring with other on-board systems. It includes General Considerations, Parameter Selection and Requirements, Signal Sources, Signal Conditioning, Data Processing, Data Storage, and Data Retrieval. Engine monitoring hardware and software are discussed so that they may be properly considered in an integrated design. Civil and military aviation applications are included and delineated where requirements differ.
HISTORICAL
1996-06-01
Standard
AIR4061A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) discusses physical and functional integration of main engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) monitoring with other on-board systems. It includes General Considerations, Parameter Selection and Requirements, Signal Sources, Signal Conditioning, Data Processing, Data Storage, and Data Retrieval. Engine monitoring hardware and software are discussed so that they may be properly considered in an integrated design. Civil and military aviation applications are included and delineated where requirements differ.
CURRENT
2016-02-26
Standard
AIR5909
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) presents metrics for assessing the performance of prognostic algorithms applied for Engine Health Management (EHM) functions. The emphasis is entirely on prognostics and as such is intended to provide an extension and complement to such documents as AIR5871, which offers information and guidance on general prognostic approaches relevant to gas turbines, and AIR4985 which offers general metrics for evaluating diagnostic systems and their impact on engine health management activities.
CURRENT
2016-11-12
Standard
AIR5120A
For Engine Monitoring Systems to meet their potential for improved safety and reduced operation and support costs, significant attention must be focused on their reliability and validity throughout the life cycle. This AIR will provide program managers, designers, developers and customers a concise reference of the activities, approaches and considerations for the development and verification of a highly reliable engine monitoring system. When applying the guidelines of this AIR it should be noted that engine monitoring systems physically or functionally integrated with the engine control system and/or performing functions that affect engine safety or are used to effect continued operation or return to service decisions shall be subject to the Type Investigation of the product in which they'll be incorporated and have to show compliance with the applicable airworthiness requirements as defined by the responsible Aviation Authority.
2017-03-14
WIP Standard
AIR5317A
The SAE Guide to APU health management establishes the foundation for developing a successful APU health management program at any aircraft or APU operator, such as an airline, an OEM, an equipment supplier, or a military transport unit. This guide identifies the best practices for using an APU health management program to improve dispatch reliability and to satisfy Extended Operations (ETOPS) availability requirements.
CURRENT
2006-03-24
Standard
AIR5317
The SAE Guide to APU health management establishes the foundation for developing a successful APU health management program at any aircraft or APU operator, such as an airline, an OEM, an equipment supplier, or a military transport unit. This guide identifies the best practices for using an APU health management program to improve dispatch reliability and to satisfy Extended Operations (ETOPS) availability requirements.
2010-10-06
WIP Standard
AIR1900B
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides an overview of temperature measurement for engine monitoring systems in various areas of aircraft gas turbine engines while focusing on current usage and methods, systems, selection criteria, and types of hardware. This document emphasizes temperature monitoring for diagnostics and condition monitoring purposes. The purpose of this AIR is to provide information and guidance on the selection and use of aircraft turbine engine temperature monitoring systems and elements.
HISTORICAL
1991-02-07
Standard
AIR1900
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides an overview of temperature measurement for engine monitoring systems in various areas of aircraft gas turbine engines while focusing on current usage and methods, systems, selection criteria, and types of hardware. This document emphasizes temperature monitoring for diagnostics and condition monitoring purposes.
CURRENT
1997-11-01
Standard
AIR1900A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides an overview of temperature measurement for engine monitoring systems in various areas of aircraft gas turbine engines while focusing on current usage and methods, systems, selection criteria, and types of hardware. This document emphasizes temperature monitoring for diagnostics and condition monitoring purposes.
HISTORICAL
1988-02-29
Standard
AIR1872
The effectiveness of Engine Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management systems is largely determined by the aircraft-specific requirements. This AIR addresses the following areas: Safety. Life-limiting criteria. Life usage algorithm development. Data acquisition and management. Parts life tracking. Design feedback. Cost effectiveness. This AIR primarily examines the requirements and techniques currently in use, including: Parts classification and control requirements. Failure causes of life-limited parts. Engine life prediction and usage measurement techniques. Method validation. Parts life usage data management. Lessons learned. Life usage tracking benefits.
CURRENT
2011-01-03
Standard
AIR1871C
SAE Aerospace Information Report AIR1871 provides valuable insight into lessons learned in the development, implementation, and operation of various health monitoring systems for propulsion engines and drive train systems. This document provides an overview of the lessons learned for ground-based systems, oil debris monitoring systems, lubrication systems, and Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) for military and commercial programs. For each case study, this document presents a brief technical description, the design requirements, accomplishments, lessons learned, and future recommendations. The lessons learned presented in this document represent a fragment of the knowledge gained through experience when developing and implementing a propulsion health management system. Previous versions of this document contain additional lessons learned during the 1980’s and 1990’s that may be of additional value to the reader.
HISTORICAL
1988-01-01
Standard
AIR1871B
The purpose of this AIR is to document some of the valuable lessons learned from several developmental and operational turbine engine monitoring programs. This AIR is not intended to be used as a standard or legal document but rather to provide an objective statement of the more important lessons learned during the development and operation of engine monitoring systems with widely varying operational requirements. It is through the use of ARP 1587 'Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Monitoring System Guide,' and SP-478 'Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Monitoring Systems,' an awareness of prior lessons learned and a clear definition of engine operational maintenance concepts that future engine monitoring systems can be developed to meet the specific needs of the user.
CURRENT
2016-11-29
Standard
AIR1873A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) describes a Limited Engine Monitoring System that can be used by the flight crew or the maintenance staff, or both, to monitor the health of gas turbine engines in aircraft. This AIR considers monitoring of gas path performance and mechanical parameters, and systems such as low cycle fatigue counters and engine history recorders. It also considers typical measurement system accuracies and their impact. This AIR is intended as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. AIR 1873 supplements ARP 1587, Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Monitoring System Guide.
HISTORICAL
1998-05-01
Standard
AIR1872A
The effectiveness of Engine Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management systems is largely determined by the aircraft-specific requirements. This document addresses the following areas: Safety Life-limiting criteria Life usage algorithm development Data acquisition and management Parts life tracking Design feedback Cost effectiveness It primarily examines the requirements and techniques currently in use, and considers the potential impact of new technology to the following areas: Parts classification and control requirements Failure causes of life-limited parts Engine life prediction and usage measurement techniques Method validation Parts life usage data management Lessons learned Life usage tracking benefits
CURRENT
2011-09-29
Standard
AIR1872B
The effectiveness of Engine Life Usage Monitoring and Parts Management systems is largely determined by the aircraft-specific requirements. This document addresses the following areas: safety, life-limiting criteria, life usage algorithm development, data acquisition and management, parts life tracking, design feedback, and cost effectiveness. It primarily examines the requirements and techniques currently in use, and considers the potential impact of new technolog to the following areas: parts classification and control requirements, failure causes of life-limited parts, engine life prediction and usage measurement techniques, method validation, parts life usage data management, lessons learned, and life usage tracking benefits. SAE ARP1587 provides general guidance on the design consideration and objectives of monitoring systems for aircraft gas turbine engines.
HISTORICAL
2001-07-01
Standard
AIR1839B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development.
HISTORICAL
2008-02-16
Standard
AIR1839C
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
CURRENT
2017-01-04
Standard
AIR1839D
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
CURRENT
2005-06-27
Standard
AIR1828B
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of lubrication system monitoring methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices that can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance.
HISTORICAL
1984-03-01
Standard
AIR1828
The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of oil system monitoring devices and methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices which can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance. In agreement with industry usage, wear particle size ranges are given in μm (1 μm = 10-3 millimeter = 10-6 meter). Other dimensions are given in millimeters, with inches in parenthesis.
HISTORICAL
1992-01-22
Standard
AIR1828A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information and guidance for the selection and use of oil system monitoring devices and methods. This AIR is intended to be used as a technical guide. It is not intended to be used as a legal document or standard. The scope of this document is limited to those inspection and analysis methods and devices that can be considered appropriate for routine maintenance. In agreement with industry usage, wear particle size ranges are given in micrometers (1 μm = 10-3 mm = 10-6 m).
HISTORICAL
1992-03-10
Standard
AIR1839A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne vibration monitoring (AVM) systems with an emphasis on system hardware design considerations. It describes AVM systems currently in use. The purpose of this AIR is to provide information and guidance for the selection, installation, and use of AVM systems and their elements. This AIR is not intended as a legal document but only as a technical guide.
HISTORICAL
1992-02-01
Standard
AIR1839
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
CURRENT
2017-07-19
Standard
AIR4174A
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide management, designers, and operators with information to assist them to decide what type of power train monitoring they desire. This document is to provide assistance in optimizing system complexity, performance and cost effectiveness. This document covers all power train elements from the point at which aircraft propulsion energy in a turbine or reciprocating engine is converted via a gear train to mechanical energy for propulsion purposes. The document covers aircraft engine driven transmission and gearbox components, their interfaces, drivetrain shafting, drive shaft hanger bearings, and associated rotating accessories, propellers, and rotor systems as shown in Figure 1. For guidance on monitoring additional engine components not addressed, herein (e.g., main shaft bearings and compressor/turbine rotors), refer to ARP1839.
HISTORICAL
1994-02-01
Standard
AIR4175
An effective ground station is vital to the successful implementation of an EMS and is a fundamental part of the total monitoring system design. Unlike on-board processing systems which principally use data to indicate when engine maintenance is required, ground stations offer much greater processing power to analyse and manipulate EMS data more comprehensively for both maintenance and logistics purposes. This document reviews the main EMS functions and discusses the operating requirements which will determine the basic design of a ground station, including the interfaces with other maintenance or logistics systems. A brief discussion is also included on some of the more recent advances in EMS ground station technology which have been specifically developed to provide more effective diagnostic capabilities for gas turbine engines. Finally, this document addresses the program management requirements associated with the initial development and on-going support of a ground station.
HISTORICAL
2002-03-06
Standard
AIR4174
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide management, designers, and operators with information to assist them to decide what type of power train monitoring they desire. This document is to provide assistance in optimizing system complexity, performance and cost effectiveness. This document covers all power train elements from the point at which the gas generator energy is transferred to mechanical energy for propulsion purposes. The document covers engine power train components, their interfaces, transmissions, gearboxes, hanger bearings, shafting and associated rotating accessories, propellers and rotor systems as shown in Figure 1. This document addresses application for rotorcraft, turboprop, and propfan drive trains for both commercial and military aircraft.
HISTORICAL
1995-10-01
Standard
AIR4176
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information that would be useful to potential users/operators and decision makers for evaluating and quantifying the benefits of an Engine Monitoring Systems (EMS) versus its cost of implementation. This document presents excerpts from reports developed to analyze “actual aircraft cost/benefits results”. These are presented as follows: First, to outline the benefits and cost elements pertaining to EMS that may be used in performing a cost versus benefits analysis. Second, to present considerations for use in conducting the analysis. Third, to provide examples of analyses and results as they relate to the user/operator and decision-maker community. The document encompasses helicopters and fixed wing aircraft and distinguishes between civilian and military considerations.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 56