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CURRENT
2012-10-23
Standard
J1172_201210
This SAE Recommended Practice defines flywheel housing flange configurations for applications requiring "O" ring sealing of the flange pilot bore. Table 1 and Figure 1 show dimensions that are different from those in SAE J617. All other dimensions and tolerances of SAE J617 apply.
HISTORICAL
1993-05-01
Standard
J1172_199305
This SAE Recommended Practice defines flywheel housing flange configurations for applications requiring 'O' ring sealing of the flange pilot bore. Table 1 and Figure 1 show dimensions that are different from those in SAE J617. All other dimensions and tolerances of SAE J617 apply.
HISTORICAL
1977-05-01
Standard
J1172_197705
This SAE Recommended Practice defines flywheel housing flange configurations for applications requiring 'O' ring sealing of the flange pilot bore. Table 1 and Figure 1 show dimensions that are different from those in SAE J617. All other dimensions and tolerances of SAE J617 apply.
HISTORICAL
1988-10-01
Standard
J1172_198810
This SAE Recommended Practice defines flywheel housing flange configurations for applications requiring 'O' ring sealing of the flange pilot bore. Table 1 and Figure 1 show dimensions that are different from those in SAE J617. All other dimensions and tolerances of SAE J617 apply.
HISTORICAL
1988-11-01
Standard
J1033_198811
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to any internal combustion engine which can utilize SAE No. 6 thru SAE No. 00 size flywheel housing. It provides instructions for correcting flywheel housing bore runout readings which are influenced by crankshaft bearing clearance. Limits for bore and face runout are specified in the various SAE Standards and Recommended Practices covering flywheels and flywheel housings.
HISTORICAL
1993-04-01
Standard
J1033_199304
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to any internal combustion engine which can utilize SAE No. 6 thru SAE No. 00 size flywheel housing. It provides instructions for correcting flywheel housing bore runout readings which are influenced by crankshaft bearing clearance. Limits for bore and face runout are specified in the various SAE Standards and Recommended Practices covering flywheels and flywheel housings.
CURRENT
2012-06-01
Standard
J1033_201206
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to any internal combustion engine which can utilize SAE No. 6 thru SAE No. 00 size flywheel housing. It provides instructions for correcting flywheel housing bore runout readings which are influenced by crankshaft bearing clearance. Limits for bore and face runout are specified in the various SAE Standards and Recommended Practices covering flywheels and flywheel housings.
CURRENT
2011-09-06
Standard
J1094_201109
This SAE Information Report describes uniform laboratory techniques for employing the constant volume sampler (CVS) system in measuring various constituents in the exhaust gas of gasoline engines installed on passenger cars and light trucks. The techniques described relate particularly to CVS systems employing positive displacement pumps. This is essentially an almost obsolete system relative to usage in industry and government. Current practice favors the use of a critical flow venturi to measure the diluted exhaust flow. In some areas of CVS practice, alternative procedures are given as a guide toward development of uniform laboratory techniques. The report includes the following sections: Introduction 1. Scope 2. References 2.1 Applicable Publications 3. Definitions 4. Test Equipment 4.1 Sampler 4.2 Bag Analysis 4.3 Modal Analysis 4.4 Instrument Operating Procedures 4.5 Supplementary Discussions 4.6 Tailpipe Connections 4.7 Chassis Dynamometer 5.
HISTORICAL
1992-06-01
Standard
J1094_199206
This SAE Information Report describes uniform laboratory techniques for employing the constant volume sampler (CVS) system in measuring various constituents in the exhaust gas of gasoline engines installed on passenger cars and light trucks. The techniques described relate particularly to CVS systems employing positive displacement pumps. In some areas of CVS practice, alternate procedures are given as a guide toward development of uniform laboratory techniques.
HISTORICAL
1978-04-01
Standard
J1094A_197804
This SAE Information Report describes uniform laboratory techniques for employing the constant volume sampler (CVS) system in measuring various constituents in the exhaust gas of gasoline engines installed on passenger cars and light trucks. The techniques described relate particularly to CVS systems employing positive displacement pumps. In some areas of CVS practice, alternate procedures are given as a guide toward development of uniform laboratory techniques.
HISTORICAL
1989-10-01
Standard
J1936_198910
This SAE Recommended Practice encompasses analytical procedures for measuring nonregulated diesel exhaust emissions. Methods are recommended for the measurement of aldehydes and carbonyl compounds, sulfates and the characterization of diesel exhaust particulates. Informational methods are presented for the measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in diesel exhaust particulate samples. The procedures are based on current proven chemical and engineering practices. However, it should be noted that the procedures are subject to change to keep pace with established experience and technology. The procedures are intended for use in the collection, analysis, and characterization of emissions from diesel engines. They are to be used as a guide in standardizing practices so that the results from various sources can be compared with some degree of accuracy. The specific purpose of each chemical method is presented at the beginning of each method section.
CURRENT
2002-10-21
Standard
J1936_200210
This SAE Recommended Practice encompasses analytical procedures for measuring nonregulated diesel exhaust emissions. Methods are recommended for the measurement of aldehydes and carbonyl compounds, sulfates and the characterization of diesel exhaust particulates. Informational methods are presented for the measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in diesel exhaust particulate samples. The procedures are based on current proven chemical and engineering practices. However, it should be noted that the procedures are subject to change to keep pace with established experience and technology. The procedures are intended for use in the collection, analysis, and characterization of emissions from diesel engines. They are to be used as a guide in standardizing practices so that the results from various sources can be compared with some degree of accuracy. The specific purpose of each chemical method is presented at the beginning of each method section.
HISTORICAL
1989-11-01
Standard
J1937_198911
The methods presented in this SAE Recommended Practice apply to the controlled testing of low-temperature charge, air-cooled, heavy-duty diesel engines. This document encompasses the following main sections: a.) Definitions of pertinent parameters; b.) Vehicle testing to determine typical values for these parameters; c.) Description of the setup and operation of the test cell system; d.) Validation testing of the test cell system. While not covered in this document, computer modeling of the vehicle engine cooler system is recognized as a valid tool to determine cooler system performance and could be utilized to supplement the testing described. However, adequate in-vehicle testing should be performed to validate the model before it is used for the purposes outlined. The procedure makes references to test cycles that are prescribed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations.
CURRENT
2011-09-06
Standard
J1937_201109
The methods presented in this SAE Recommended Practice apply to the controlled testing of low-temperature charge, air-cooled, heavy-duty diesel engines. This document encompasses the following main sections: Definitions of pertinent parameters Vehicle testing to determine typical values for these parameters Description of the setup and operation of the test cell system Validation testing of the test cell system While not covered in this document, computer modeling of the vehicle engine cooler system is recognized as a valid tool to determine cooler system performance and could be utilized to supplement the testing described. However, adequate in-vehicle testing should be performed to validate the model before it is used for the purposes outlined. The procedure makes references to test cycles that are prescribed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations.
HISTORICAL
2002-10-21
Standard
J1937_200210
The methods presented in this SAE Recommended Practice apply to the controlled testing of low-temperature charge, air-cooled, heavy-duty diesel engines. This document encompasses the following main sections: a.) Definitions of pertinent parameters; b.) Vehicle testing to determine typical values for these parameters; c.) Description of the setup and operation of the test cell system; and d.) Validation testing of the test cell system. While not covered in this document, computer modeling of the vehicle engine cooler system is recognized as a valid tool to determine cooler system performance and could be utilized to supplement the testing described. However, adequate in-vehicle testing should be performed to validate the model before it is used for the purposes outlined. The procedure makes references to test cycles that are prescribed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations.
CURRENT
2002-10-21
Standard
J177_200210
The method presented applies to the analysis of the indicated constituents in diesel engine exhaust, or vehicles using diesel engines, when operating at steady-state conditions. The measurements of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitric oxide are based on continuous sampling and analysis by nondispersive infrared (NDIR) methods. Measurement of total oxides of nitrogen by chemiluminescence and NDIR methods is discussed. This SAE Recommended Practice provides for the measurement of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and oxides of nitrogen in diesel exhaust.
HISTORICAL
1970-06-01
Standard
J177_197006
The method presented applies to the analysis of the indicated constituents in diesel engine exhaust, or vehicles using diesel engines, when operating at steady-state conditions. The measurements of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitric oxide are based on continuous sampling and analysis by nondispersive infrared (NDIR) methods. Measurement of total oxides of nitrogen by chemiluminescence and NDIR methods is discussed. This SAE Recommended Practice provides for the measurement of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and oxides of nitrogen in diesel exhaust.
CURRENT
2001-10-30
Standard
J1643_200110
This SAE Draft Technical Report applies to nomenclature of diesel engine catalytic converter parts and various configurations.
HISTORICAL
1973-03-01
Standard
J1003_197303
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for use as a test procedure to determine the gaseous emission level of diesel engines. Its purpose is to provide a map of an engine's emissions characteristics which, through use of the proper weighing factors, can be used as a measure of that engine's emission levels under various applications. The emission results for hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide are expressed in units of grams per kilowatt hour (grams/brake horsepower hour) and represent the mass rate of emissions per unit of work accomplished. The emissions are measured in accordance with SAE Recommended Practices J177, J215, and J244 using nondispersive infrared equipment for CO and CO2, a heated flame ionization analyzer for HC, and a high performance NDIR or a chemiluminescence analyzer for NO{sub}x. All emissions are measured during steady-state engine operation.
HISTORICAL
1990-06-01
Standard
J1003_199006
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for use as a test procedure to determine the gaseous emission level of diesel engines. Its purpose is to provide a map of an engine's emissions characteristics which, through use of the proper weighing factors, can be used as a measure of that engine's emission levels under various applications. The emission results for hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide are expressed in units of grams per kilowatt hour (grams/brake horsepower hour) and represent the mass rate of emissions per unit of work accomplished. The emissions are measured in accordance with SAE Recommended Practices J177, J215, and J244 using nondispersive infrared equipment for CO and CO2, a heated flame ionization analyzer for HC, and a high performance NDIR or a chemiluminescence analyzer for NO{sub}x. All emissions are measured during steady-state engine operation.
HISTORICAL
1984-02-01
Standard
J1003_198402
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for use as a test procedure to determine the gaseous emission level of diesel engines. Its purpose is to provide a map of an engine's emissions characteristics which, through use of the proper weighing factors, can be used as a measure of that engine's emission levels under various applications. The emission results for hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide are expressed in units of grams per kilowatt hour (grams/brake horsepower hour) and represent the mass rate of emissions per unit of work accomplished. The emissions are measured in accordance with SAE Recommended Practices J177, J215, and J244 using nondispersive infrared equipment for CO and CO2, a heated flame ionization analyzer for HC, and a high performance NDIR or a chemiluminescence analyzer for NO{sub}x. All emissions are measured during steady-state engine operation.
CURRENT
2002-10-21
Standard
J1003_200210
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for use as a test procedure to determine the gaseous emission level of diesel engines. Its purpose is to provide a map of an engine's emissions characteristics which, through use of the proper weighing factors, can be used as a measure of that engine's emission levels under various applications. The emission results for hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide are expressed in units of grams per kilowatt hour (grams/brake horsepower hour) and represent the mass rate of emissions per unit of work accomplished. The emissions are measured in accordance with SAE Recommended Practices J177, J215, and J244 using nondispersive infrared equipment for CO and CO2, a heated flame ionization analyzer for HC, and a high performance NDIR or a chemiluminescence analyzer for NO{sub}x. All emissions are measured during steady-state engine operation.
HISTORICAL
1990-06-01
Standard
J1456_199006
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to flywheels and flywheel-starter ring gear assemblies used with internal combustion engines of the spark ignition and diesel type equipped with a governor or speed limiting device. Engine sizes are those capable of using SAE No. 6 through SAE No. 00 flywheel housings. This document applies to methods used to determine the rotational speed capability of flywheels for stresses imposed by centrifugal forces only. This document is intended to establish maximum allowable rotational speeds for flywheels under centrifugally imposed stresses.
HISTORICAL
1984-12-01
Standard
J1456_198412
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to flywheels and flywheel-starter ring gear assemblies used with internal combustion engines of the spark ignition and diesel type equipped with a governor or speed limiting device. Engine sizes are those capable of using SAE No. 6 through SAE No. 00 flywheel housings. This document applies to methods used to determine the rotational speed capability of flywheels for stresses imposed by centrifugal forces only. This document is intended to establish maximum allowable rotational speeds for flywheels under centrifugally imposed stresses.
CURRENT
2012-10-23
Standard
J1456_201210
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to flywheels and flywheel-starter ring gear assemblies used with internal combustion engines of the spark ignition and diesel type equipped with a governor or speed limiting device. Engine sizes are those capable of using SAE No. 6 through SAE No. 00 flywheel housings. This document applies to methods used to determine the rotational speed capability of flywheels for stresses imposed by centrifugal forces only.
HISTORICAL
1995-07-01
Standard
J1456_199507
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to flywheels and flywheel-starter ring gear assemblies used with internal combustion engines of the spark ignition and diesel type equipped with a governor or speed limiting device. Engine sizes are those capable of using SAE No. 6 through SAE No. 00 flywheel housings. This document applies to methods used to determine the rotational speed capability of flywheels for stresses imposed by centrifugal forces only. This document is intended to establish maximum allowable rotational speeds for flywheels under centrifugally imposed stresses.
HISTORICAL
1995-06-01
Standard
J1515_199506
The guidelines in this SAE Information Report are directed at laboratory engine dynamometer test procedures with alternative fuels, and they are applicable to four-stroke cycle spark ignition (SI) and diesel (CI) engines (naturally aspirated or pressure charged, with or without charge air cooling). A brief overview of investigations with some alternative fuels can be found in SAE J1297. Other SAE documents covering vehicle, engine, or component testing may be affected by use of alternative fuels. Some of the documents that may be affected can be found in Appendix A. Guidelines are provided for the engine power test code (SAE J1349) in Appendix D. The principles of these guidelines may apply to other procedures and codes, but the effects have not been investigated. The report is organized into four technical sections, each dealing with an important aspect of testing or reporting of results when using alternative fuels.
HISTORICAL
1988-03-01
Standard
J1515_198803
The guidelines in this SAE Information Report are directed at laboratory engine dynamometer test procedures with alternative fuels, and they are applicable to four-stroke cycle spark ignition (SI) and diesel (CI) engines (naturally aspirated or pressure charged, with or without charge air cooling). A brief overview of investigations with some alternative fuels can be found in SAE J1297. Other SAE documents covering vehicle, engine, or component testing may be affected by use of alternative fuels. Some of the documents that may be affected can be found in Appendix A. Guidelines are provided for the engine power test code (SAE J1349) in Appendix D. The principles of these guidelines may apply to other procedures and codes, but the effects have not been investigated. The report is organized into four technical sections, each dealing with an important aspect of testing or reporting of results when using alternative fuels.
CURRENT
2011-09-06
Standard
J1515_201109
The guidelines in this SAE Information Report are directed at laboratory engine dynamometer test procedures with alternative fuels, and they are applicable to four-stroke and two-stroke cycle spark ignition (SI) and diesel (CI) engines (naturally aspirated or pressure charged, with or without charge air cooling). A brief overview of investigations with some alternative fuels can be found in SAE J1297. Other SAE documents covering vehicle, engine, or component testing may be affected by use of alternative fuels. Some of the documents that may be affected can be found in Appendix A. Guidelines are provided for the engine power test code (SAE J1349) in Appendix D. The principles of these guidelines may apply to other procedures and codes, but the effects have not been investigated. The report is organized into four technical sections, each dealing with an important aspect of testing or reporting of results when using alternative fuels.
HISTORICAL
1982-06-01
Standard
J1245_198206
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended as a guide in the usage of mechanical face seals for the engine coolant pump application. The main purpose of the document is to fill the void caused by the lack of a ready source of practical information on the design and use of the engine coolant pump face seal. Included in the document is a compilation of present practices, as in a description of the various types of seals, material combinations, design data, tolerances, drawing format, qualification and inspection information, and quality control data. The terminology used throughout the document is recommended and, through common usage, is hoped to promote uniformity in seal nomenclature.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 99