Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 29 of 29
2011-08-30
Journal Article
2011-01-1991
Matthias Thewes, Martin Muther, Adrien Brassat, Stefan Pischinger, Andreas Sehr
In this study the fuel influence of several bio-fuel candidates on homogeneous engine combustion systems with direct injection is investigated. The results reveal Ethanol and 2-Butanol as the two most knock-resistant fuels. Hence these two fuels enable the highest efficiency improvements versus RON95 fuel ranging from 3.6% - 12.7% for Ethanol as a result of a compression ratio increase of 5 units. Tetrahydro-2-methylfuran has a worse knock resistance and a decreased thermal efficiency due to the required reduction in compression ratio by 1.5 units. The enleanment capability is similar among all fuels thus they pose no improvements for homogeneous lean burn combustion systems despite a significant reduction in NOX emissions for the alcohol fuels as a consequence of lower combustion temperatures.
2009-06-15
Technical Paper
2009-01-1918
M. Cagri Cevik, Stefan Pischinger, Martin Rebbert, Franz Maassen
This paper introduces different modeling approaches of crankshafts, compares the refinement levels and discusses the difference between the results of the crankshaft durability calculation methodologies. A V6 crankshaft is considered for the comparison of the refinement levels depending on the deviation between the signals such as main bearing forces and deflection angle. Although a good correlation is observed between the results in low speed range, the deviation is evident through the mid to high speed ranges. The deviation amplitude differs depending on the signal being observed and model being used. An inline 4 crankshaft is considered for the comparison of the durability results. The analysis results show that the durability potential is underestimated with a classical crankshaft calculation approach which leads to a limitation of maximum speed of 5500 rpm.
2009-01-21
Technical Paper
2009-26-0025
Thomas Körfer, Matthias Lamping, Andreas Kolbeck, Stefan Pischinger, Dirk Adolph, Hartwig Busch
The high-speed Dl-diesel engine has made a significant advance since the beginning of the 90's in the Western European passenger car market. Apart from the traditional advantage in fuel economy, further factors contributing to this success have been significantly improved performance and power density, as well as the permanent progress made in acoustics and comfort. In addition to the efforts to improve efficiency of automotive powertrains, the requirement for cleaner air increases through the continuous worldwide restriction of emissions by legislative regulations for diesel engines. Against the backdrop of global climate change, significant reduction of CO2 is observed. Hence, for the future, engine and vehicle concepts are needed, that, while maintaining the well-established attractive market attributes, compare more favorably with regard to fuel consumption.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1284
Philipp Adomeit, Markus Jakob, Stefan Pischinger, Andre Brunn, Jens Ewald
The application of technologies such as direct injection, turbo charging and variable valve timing has caused a significant evolution of the gasoline engine with positive effects on fuel consumption and emissions. The current developments are primarily focused on the realization of improved full load characteristics and fuel consumption reduction with stoichiometric operation, following the downsizing approach in combination with turbo charging and high specific power. The requirements of high specific power in a relatively small cylinder displacement and a wide range of DI injection specifications lead to competing development targets and to a high number of degrees of freedom during engine layout and optimization. One of the major targets is to assess the stability of the combustion system in the early development phase.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0613
Thomas Winsel, Mohamed Ayeb, Christian Wilhelm, Heinz J. Theuerkauf, Stefan Pischinger, Rolf Woermann, Christof Schernus
A main focus of development in modern SI engine technology is variable valve timing, which implies a high potential of improvement regarding fuel consumption and emissions. Variable opening, period and lift of inlet and outlet valves enable numerous possibilities to alter gas exchange and combustion. However, this additional variability generates special demands on the calibration process of specific engine control devices, particularly under cold start and warm-up conditions. This paper presents procedures, based on Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL) simulation, to support the classical calibration task efficiently. An existing approach is extended, such that a virtual combustion engine is available including additional valve timing variability. Engine models based purely on physical first principles are often not capable of real time execution. However, the definition of initial parameters for the ECU requires a model with both real time capability and sufficient accuracy.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0890
Barbara Graziano, Florian Kremer, Stefan Pischinger, Karl Alexander Heufer, Hans Rohs
Abstract The current and future restrictions on pollutant emissions from internal combustion engines require a holistic investigation of the abilities of alternative fuels to optimize the combustion process and ensure cleaner combustion. In this regard, the Tailor-made Fuels from Biomass (TMFB) Cluster at Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen University aims at designing production processes for biofuels as well as fuels optimal for use in internal combustion engines. The TMFB Cluster's scientific approach considers the molecular structure of the fuels as an additional degree of freedom for the optimization of both the production pathways and the combustion process of such novel biofuels. Thus, the model-based specification of target parameters is of the utmost importance to improve engine combustion performance and to send feedback information to the biofuel production process.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0399
Alexander Jaust, Bastian Morcinkowski, Stefan Pischinger, Jens Ewald
Abstract In this work, a transport and mixing model that calculates mixing in thermodynamic phase space was derived and validated. The mixing in thermodynamic multizone space is consistent to the one in the spatially resolved physical space. The model is developed using a turbulent channel flow as simplified domain. This physical domain of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is divided into zones based on the quantitative value of transported scalars. Fluxes between the zones are introduced to describe mixing from the transport equation of the probability density function based on the mixing process in physical space. The mixing process of further scalars can then be carried out with these fluxes instead of solving additional transport equations. The relationship between the exchange flux in phase space and the concept of scalar dissipation are shown and validated by comparison to DNS results.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0182
Vivak Luckhchoura, Francois Robert, Norbert Peters, Michael Rottmann, Stefan Pischinger
The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of spray-bowl interaction on combustion, and pollutants formation at one specific high-load point of a single-cylinder small-bore diesel engine through computational analysis. The simulations are performed using Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF) model with detailed chemical kinetics. Detailed chemistry-based soot model is used for the prediction of soot emissions. The simulations are performed for five different injection timings. Model-predicted cylinder pressure and exhaust emissions are validated against the measured data for all the injection timings. A new method - Two-part analysis - is then applied to investigate the spray-bowl interaction. Two-part analysis splits the volume of the combustion chamber into two, namely the piston bowl and the squish volume. Through analysis, among others the histories of soot, carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO ) emissions inside both volumes are shown.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0591
Philipp Adomeit, Rolf Weinowski, Jens Ewald, Andre Brunn, Henning Kleeberg, Dean Tomazic, Stefan Pischinger, Markus Jakob
Advanced technologies such as direct injection DI, turbocharging and variable valve timing, have lead to a significant evolution of the gasoline engine with positive effects on driving pleasure, fuel consumption and emissions. Today's developments are primarily focused on the implementation of improved full load characteristics for driving performance and fuel consumption reduction with stoichiometric operation, following the downsizing approach in combination with turbocharging and high specific power. The requirements of a relatively small cylinder displacement with high specific power and a wide flexibility of DI injection specifications lead to competing development targets and additionally to a high number of degrees of freedom during optimization. In order to successfully approach an optimum solution, FEV has evolved an advanced development methodology, which is based on the combination of simulation, optical diagnostics and engine thermodynamics testing.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1636
T. Hülser, G. Grünefeld, T. Brands, M. Günther, Stefan Pischinger
Downsizing of highly-boosted spark-ignition (SI) engines is limited by pre-ignition, which may lead to extremely strong knocking and severe engine damage. Unfortunately, the concerning mechanisms are generally not yet fully understood, although several possible reasons have been suggested in previous research. The primary objective of the present paper is to investigate the influence of molecular bio-fuel structure on the locations of pre-ignition in a realistic, highly-charged SI engine at low speed by state-of-the-art optical measurements. The latter are conducted by using a high-sensitivity UV endoscope and an intensified high-speed camera. Two recently tested bio-fuels, namely tetrahydro-2-methylfuran (2-MTHF) and 2-methylfuran (2-MF), are investigated. Compared to conventional fuels, they have potential advantages in the well-to-tank balance. In addition, both neat ethanol and conventional gasoline are used as fuels.
2010-09-28
Technical Paper
2010-32-0037
Reza Rezaei, Stefan Pischinger, Jens Ewald, Philipp Adomeit
The fulfillment of the aggravated demands on future small-size High-Speed Direct Injection (HSDI) Diesel engines requires next to the optimization of the injection system and the combustion chamber also the generation of an optimal in-cylinder swirl charge motion. To evaluate different port concepts for modern HSDI Diesel engines, usually quantities as the in-cylinder swirl ratio and the flow coefficient are determined, which are measured on a steady-state flow test bench. It has been shown that different valve lift strategies nominally lead to similar swirl levels. However, significant differences in combustion behavior and engine-out emissions give rise to the assumption that local differences in the in-cylinder flow structure caused by different valve lift strategies have noticeable impact. In this study an additional criterion, the homogeneity of the swirl flow, is introduced and a new approach for a quantitative assessment of swirl flow pattern is presented.
2012-04-16
Technical Paper
2012-01-1303
Yves Rosefort, Andreas Wiartalla, Henry Kwee, Stefan Pischinger
For on- and off-highway applications in 2012/2014 new legislative emissions requirements will be applied for both European (EURO 6/stage 4) and US (US 2010/Tier4 final) standards. Specifically the NOX-emission limit will be lowered down to 0.46 g/kWh (net power ≻ 56 kW (EU)/130 kW (US) - 560 kW). While for the previous emissions legislation various ways could be used to stay within the emissions limits (engine internal and aftertreatment measures), DeNOX-aftertreatment systems will be mandatory to reach future limits. In these kinds of applications fuel consumption of the engines is a very decisive selling argument for customers. Total cost of ownership needs to be as low as possible. The trade-off between fuel consumption and NOX emissions forces manufacturers to find an optimal solution, especially with regard to increasing fuel prices. In state-of-the-art calibration processes the aftertreatment system is considered separately from the calibration of the thermodynamics.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-0167
C. Felsch, V. Luckhchoura, J. Weber, N. Peters, C. Hasse, W. Wiese, Stefan Pischinger, A. Kolbeck, P. Adomeit
Abstract Combustion and pollutant formation in a new recently introduced Common-Rail DI Diesel engine concept with roof-shaped combustion chamber and tumble charge motion are numerically investigated using the Representative Interactive Flamelet concept (RIF). A reference case with a cup shaped piston bowl for full load operating conditions is considered in detail. In addition to the reference case, three more cases are investigated with a variation of start of injection (SOI). A surrogate fuel consisting of n-decane (70% liquid volume fraction) and α-methylnaphthalene (30% liquid volume fraction) is used in the simulation. The underlying complete reaction mechanism comprises 506 elementary reactions and 118 chemical species. Special emphasis is put on pollutant formation, in particular on the formation of NOx, where a new technique based on a three-dimensional transport equation within the flamelet framework is applied.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1362
Thomas Winsel, Mohamed Ayeb, Heinz J. Theuerkauf, Stefan Pischinger, Christof Schernus, Georg Lütkemeyer
The modern engine design process is characterized by shorter development cycles and a reduced number of prototypes. However, simultaneously exhaust after-treatment and emission testing is becoming increasingly more sophisticated. The introduction of predictive real-time simulation tools that represent the entire powertrain can likely contribute to improving the efficiency of the calibration process. Engine models, which are purely based on physical first principles, are usually not capable of real-time applications, especially if the simulation is focused on cold start and warm-up behavior. However, the initial data definition for the ECU using a Hardware-in-the-Loop (HiL)-Simulator requires a model with both real-time capability and sufficient accuracy. The use of artificial intelligence systems becomes necessary, e.g. neural networks. Methods, structures and the realization of a hybrid real-time model are presented in this paper, which combines physical and neural network models.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0994
Stefan Pischinger, Christof Schernus, Georg Lütkemeyer, H. J. Theuerkauf, Thomas Winsel, Mohamed Ayeb
The modern engine development process is characterized by shorter development cycles and a reduced number of prototypes. However, simultaneously exhaust after-treatment and emission testing is becoming increasingly more sophisticated. It is expected that predictive simulation tools that encompass the entire powertrain can potentially improve the efficiency of the calibration process. The testing of an ECU using a HiL system requires a real-time model. Additionally, if the initial parameters of the ECU are to be defined and tested, the model has to be more accurate than is typical for ECU functional testing. It is possible to enhance the generalization capability of the simulation, with neuronal network sub-models embedded into the architecture of a physical model, while still maintaining real-time execution. This paper emphasizes the experimental investigation and physical modeling of the port fuel injected SI engine.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0630
S. Mori, O. Lang, W. Salber, Stefan Pischinger, C. Bücker
The main assignment of Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI) operation range expansion is to reduce the burn rate or combustion noise at high load and to minimize misfire at low load. The potential of two principal EGR strategies is well known to initiate CAI in a wide range of operation map by using a variable train system: the Exhaust Port Recirculation (EPR) for higher part load and the Combustion Chamber Recirculation (CCR - also called Negative Valve Overlap) for lower part load. However the detailed comparison of the ignition phenomena with each EGR strategy has not been fully studied yet. In this paper, EPR and CCR were compared with same operational condition (engine speed and load). For the analysis, flame luminescence and Raman scattering method for optical measurement and STAR-CD (CD-adapco) for numerical simulation are used.
2007-04-16
Technical Paper
2007-01-1412
Philipp Adomeit, Oliver Lang, Stefan Pischinger, Richard Aymanns, Markus Graf, Georg Stapf
Engine processes are subject to cyclic fluctuations, which a have direct effect on the operating and emission behavior of the engine. The fluctuations in direct injection gasoline engines are induced and superimposed by the flow and the injection. In stratified operation they can cause serious operating problems, such as misfiring. The current state of knowledge on the formation and causes of cyclic fluctuations is rather limited, which can be attributed to the complex nature of flow instabilities. The current investigation analyzes the cyclic fluctuations of the in-cylinder charge motion and the mixture formation in a direct injection gasoline engine using laser-optical diagnostics and numerical 3D-calculation. Optical measurement techniques and pressure indication are used to measure flow, mixture formation, and combustion processes of the individual cycles.
2009-04-20
Technical Paper
2009-01-0653
Dirk Adolph, Reza Rezaei, Stefan Pischinger, Philipp Adomeit, Thomas Körfer, Andreas Kolbeck, Matthias Lamping, Marek Tatur, Dean Tomazic
The main tasks for all future powertrain developments are: regulated emissions, CO2-values, comfort, good drivability, high reliability and affordable costs. One widely discussed approach for fuel consumption improvement within passenger car applications, is to incorporate the downsizing effect. To attain constant engine performance an increase of boost pressure and/or rated speed is mandatory. In both cases, the mass flow rate through the intake and exhaust ports and valves will rise. In this context, the impact of the port layout on the system has to be reassessed. In this paper, the impact of the port layout on a modern diesel combustion system will be discussed and a promising concept shall be described in detail. The investigations shown include flow measurements, PIV measurements of intake flow, CFD simulations of the flow field during intake and results from the thermodynamic test bench. One of the important topics is to prove the impact of the flow quality on the combustion.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2501
Thomas Laible, Stefan Pischinger, Bastian Holderbaum
Abstract Within a project of the Research Association for Combustion Engines e.V., different measures for rising the temperature of exhaust gas aftertreatment components of both a passenger car and an industrial/commercial vehicle engine were investigated on a test bench as well as in simulation. With the passenger car diesel engine and different catalyst configurations, the potential of internal and external heating measures was evaluated. The configuration consisting of a NOx storage catalyst (NSC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) illustrates the potential of an electrically heated NSC. The exhaust aftertreatment system consisting of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a DPF shows in simulation how variable valve timing in combination with electric heated DOC can be used to increase the exhaust gas temperature and thus fulfill the EU6 emission limits.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2508
Joschka Schaub, Thorsten Schnorbus, Thomas Koerfer, Stefan Pischinger
Abstract Model-based control strategies along with an adapted calibration process become more important in the overall vehicle development process. The main drivers for this development trend are increasing numbers of vehicle variants and more complex engine hardware, which is required to fulfill the more and more stringent emission legislation and fuel consumption norms. Upcoming fundamental changes in the homologation process with EU 6c, covering an extended range of different operational and ambient conditions, are suspected to intensify this trend. One main reason for the increased calibration effort is the use of various complex aftertreatment technologies amongst different vehicle applications, requiring numerous combustion modes. The different combustion modes range from heating strategies for active Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration or early SCR light-off and rich combustion modes to purge the NOx storage catalyst (NSC) up to partially premixed combustion modes.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2255
Martin Krieck, Marco Günther, Stefan Pischinger, Ulrich Kramer, Thomas Heinze, Matthias Thewes
Abstract Liquefied Petroleum Gas direct injection (LPG DI) is believed to be the key enabler for the adaption of modern downsized gasoline engines to the usage of LPG, since LPG DI avoids the significant low end torque drop, which goes along with the application of conventional LPG port fuel injection systems to downsized gasoline DI engines, and provides higher combustion efficiencies. However, especially the high vapor pressure of C3 hydrocarbons can result in hot fuel handling issues as evaporation or even in reaching the supercritical state of LPG upstream or inside the high pressure pump (HPP). This is particularly critical under hot soak conditions. As a result of a rapid fuel density drop close to the supercritical point, the HPP is not able to keep the rail pressure constant and the engine stalls.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0202
Bjoern Franzke, Stefan Pischinger, Philipp Adomeit, Christof Schernus, Johannes Scharf, Tolga Uhlmann
Abstract A new approach is presented to modelling wall heat transfer in the exhaust port and manifold within 1D gas exchange simulation to ensure a precise calculation of thermal exhaust enthalpy. One of the principal characteristics of this approach is the partition of the exhaust process in a blow-down and a push-out phase. In addition to the split in two phases, the exhaust system is divided into several sections to consider changes in heat transfer characteristics downstream the exhaust valves. Principally, the convective heat transfer is described by the characteristic numbers of Nusselt, Reynolds and Prandtl. However, the phase individual correlation coefficients are derived from 3D CFD investigations of the flow in the exhaust system combined with Low-Re turbulence modelling. Furthermore, heat losses on the valve and the seat ring surfaces are considered by an empirical model approach.
2012-05-15
Technical Paper
2011-01-2443
Ali Awarke, Martin Jaeger, Stefan Pischinger, Oezen Oezdemir
One of the challenges faced when using Li-ion batteries in electric vehicles is to keep the cell temperatures below a given threshold. Mathematical modeling would indeed be an efficient tool to test virtually this requirement and accelerate the battery product lifecycle. Moreover, temperature predicting models could potentially be used on-board to decrease the limitations associated with sensor based temperature feedbacks. Accordingly, we present a complete modeling procedure which was used to calculate the cell temperatures during a given electric vehicle trip. The procedure includes a simple vehicle dynamics model, an equivalent circuit battery model, and a 3D finite element thermal model. Model parameters were identified from measurements taken during constant current and pulse current discharge tests. The cell temperatures corresponding to an actual electric vehicle trip were calculated and compared with measured values.
2009-06-15
Technical Paper
2009-01-1796
Wolfram Wiese, Stefan Pischinger, Philipp Adomeit, Jens Ewald
In this paper a new approach is presented to evaluate the combustion behaviour of homogeneous gasoline engines by predicting burn delay and -duration in a way which can be obtained under the time constraints of the development process. This is accomplished by means of pure in-cylinder flow simulations without a classical combustion model. The burn delay model is based on the local distribution of the turbulent flow near the spark plug. It features also a methodology to compare different designs regarding combustion stability. The correlation for burn duration uses a turbulent characteristic number that is obtained from the turbulent flow in the combustion chamber together with a model for the turbulent burning velocity. The results show good agreement with the combustion process of the analyzed engines.
2015-09-01
Journal Article
2015-01-1934
Barbara Graziano, Benedikt Heuser, Florian Kremer, Stefan Pischinger, Hans Rohs
A new index to evaluate the inherent soot reduction in a diesel-like spray plume is proposed in this study. The index is named “Oxidation Potential Number” and was derived with the help of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. C8 - C16 n-alkanes, 1-alcohols and di-n-ethers were studied with the help of this index over four part load engine operating conditions, representative of a C-class diesel vehicle. The CFD modelling results have shown that C8 molecules feature a higher potentiality to reduce the soot. Thus, C8 molecules were tested in a single cylinder diesel engine over the same operating conditions. In conclusion, the proposed index is compared with the soot engine out emission.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2295
Ahmad Omari, Stefan Pischinger, Om Parkash Bhardwaj, Bastian Holderbaum, Jukka Nuottimäki, Markku Honkanen
Abstract The optimization study presented herein is aimed to minimize the fuel consumption and engine-out emissions using commercially available EN15940 compatible HVO (Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil) fuel. The investigations were carried out on FEV’s 3rd generation HECS (High Efficiency Combustion System) multi-cylinder engine (1.6L, 4 Cylinder, Euro 6). Using a global DOE approach, the effects of calibration parameters on efficiency and emissions were obtained and analyzed. This was followed by a global optimization procedure to obtain a dedicated calibration for HVO. The study was aiming for efficiency improvement and it was found that at lower loads, higher fractions of low pressure EGR in combination with lower fuel injection pressures were favorable. At higher loads, a combustion center advancement, increase of injection pressure and reduced pilot injection quantities were possible without exceeding the noise and NOx levels of the baseline Diesel.
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0380
A. Wiartalla, Stefan Pischinger, W. Bornscheuer, K. Fieweger, J. Ogrzewalla
In this paper different compressor/expander concepts including mechanical superchargers, turbochargers and two-stage charging concepts are analysed with regard to their suitability for fuel cell applications. Special attention is focused on system designs which use the energy of the tail gases for driving the compressor. The net efficiencies of different system concepts at full load were calculated with a simulation model, based on Matlab/Simulink‘ and show, that with a single stage turbocharger in combination with a tail gas burner good efficiencies and high power densities can be obtained at a pressure level of more than 2.5 bar.
2002-03-04
Technical Paper
2002-01-0409
Stefan Pischinger, Carsten Schönfelder, Oliver Lang, Helmut Kindl
In this paper, boosting strategies are investigated for part load operation of typical fuel-cell-systems. The optimal strategy can mainly be obtained by simulation. The boosting strategy is one of the most essential parameters for design and operation of a fuel-cell-system. High pressure ratios enable high power densities, low size and weight. Simultaneously, the demands in humidification and water recovery for today's systems are reduced. But power consumption and design effort of the system increases strongly with the pressure level. Therefore, the main focus must be on the system efficiencies at part load. In addition, certain boundary conditions like the inlet temperature of the fuel-cell stack must be maintained. With high pressure levels the humidification of the intake air before, within or after the compressor is not sufficient to dissipate enough heat. Vaporization during the compression process shows efficiency advantages while the needs in heat dissipation decreases.
1990-02-01
Technical Paper
900021
Stefan Pischinger, John B. Heywood
A conventional spark plug and a spark plug with smaller electrodes were studied in M.I.T.'s transparent square piston engine. The purpose was to learn more about how the electrode geometry affects the heat losses to the electrodes and the electrical performance of the ignition system, and how this affects the flame development process in an engine. A schlieren system which provides two orthogonal views of the developing flame was used to define the initial flame growth process, for as many as 100 consecutive cycles. Voltage and current waveforms were recorded to characterize the spark discharge, and cylinder pressure data were used to characterize the engine performance. The spark plug with the smaller electrodes was shown to reduce the heat losses to the electrodes, and thereby extend the stable operating regime of the engine. At conditions close to the stable operating limit, cycle-by-cycle variations in heat losses cause significant cyclic variations in flame development.
Viewing 1 to 29 of 29

    Filter

    • Range:
      to:
    • Year: