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Viewing 1 to 30 of 105
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0605
Alvaro Diez, Hua Zhao
Over the last decade, the diesel engine has made dramatic progress in its performance and market penetration. However, in order to meet future emissions legislations, Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) and particulate matters' (PM) emissions will need to be reduced simultaneously. Nowadays researchers are focused on different combustion modes which can have a great potential for both low soot and low NOx. In order to achieve this, different injection strategies have been investigated. This study investigates the effects of split injection strategies with high levels of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on combustion performance and emissions in a single-cylinder direct injection optical diesel engine. The investigation is focused on the effects of injection timing of split injection strategies. A Ricardo Hydra single-cylinder optical engine was used in which conventional experimental methods like cylinder pressure data, heat release analysis and exhaust emissions analysis were applied.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0821
Cho-Yu Lee, Hua Zhao, Tom Ma
In a previous paper [ 1 ], the authors have proposed a cost effective air hybrid concept based on a proprietary intake system and cam profile switching (CPS) system [ 2 ]. It was shown through engine simulations that the pneumatic hybrid operation could be achieved with about 15% regenerative efficiency. The proposed air hybrid operation can be achieved with proven technologies and engine components and hence it represents a cost-effective, reliable and quick deployable solution for low carbon vehicles. In this work, a four-cylinder 2 litre diesel engine has been modelled to operate on refined air hybrid engine configurations and the braking and motoring performance of each configuration have been studied. Both air hybrid systems can be constructed with production technologies and incur minimum changes to the existing engine design.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0843
Manida Tongroon, Hua Zhao
Due to its potential for simultaneous improvement in fuel consumption and exhaust emissions, controlled autoignition (CAI) combustion has been subject to continuous research in the last several years. At the same time, there has been a lot of interest in the use of alternative fuels in order to reduce reliance on conventional fossil fuels. Therefore, this experimental study has been carried out to investigate the effect of alcohol fuels on the CAI combustion process and on the resulting engine performance. The experimental work was conducted on an optical single cylinder engine with an air-assisted injector. To achieve controlled autoignition, residual gas was trapped in the cylinder by using negative valve overlap and an intake air heater was used to ensure stable CAI combustion in the optical engine. Methanol, ethanol and blended fuels were tested and compared with the results of gasoline.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1354
Yufeng Li, Hua Zhao, Ben Leach, Tom Ma, Nicos Ladommatos
In order to take advantage of different properties of fuel components or fractions, a new concept of fuel stratification has been proposed by the authors. This concept requires that two fractions of standard gasoline (e.g., light and heavy fractions) or two different fuels in a specially formulated composite be introduced into the cylinder separately through two separate intake ports. The two fuels will be stratified into two regions in the cylinder by means of strong tumble flows. In order to verify and optimize the fuel stratification, a two-tracer Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) technique was developed and applied to visualize fuel stratification in a three-valve twin-spark SI engine. This was realized by detecting simultaneously fluorescence emissions from 3-pentanone in one fuel (hexane) and from N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) in the other fuel (iso-octane).
2004-06-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1904
Pierre Duret, Bertrand Gatellier, Luis Monteiro, Marjorie Miche, Peter Zima, Damien Maroteaux, Jacky Guezet, David Blundell, Fritz Spinnler, Hua Zhao, Matteo Perotti, Lucio Araneo
The purpose of the European « SPACE LIGHT » (Whole SPACE combustion for LIGHT duty diesel vehicles) 3-year project launched in 2001 is to research and develop an innovative Homogeneous internal mixture Charged Compression Ignition (HCCI) for passenger cars diesel engine where the combustion process can take place simultaneously in the whole SPACE of the combustion chamber while providing almost no NOx and particulates emissions. This paper presents the whole project with the main R&D tasks necessary to comply with the industrial and technical objectives of the project. The research approach adopted is briefly described. It is then followed by a detailed description of the most recent progress achieved during the tasks recently undertaken. The methodology adopted starts from the research study of the in-cylinder combustion specifications necessary to achieve HCCI combustion from experimental single cylinder engines testing in premixed charged conditions.
2004-06-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1901
Hua Zhao, Z. Peng, T. Ma
The paper reports an investigation into the HCCI/CAI combustion process in a single cylinder optical engine. The auto-ignition and combustion processes of primary reference fuels were studied using the two-dimensional PLIF technique as well as heat release analyses. The formaldehyde formed during the low-temperature reactions of HCCI/CAI combustion was visualized by a PLIF system. The formaldehyde was excited by a Nd:YAG laser pumped tunable dye laser at 355nm wavelength and detected by a gated ICCD camera. Both temporal and spatial distributions of formaldehyde were measured during the auto-ignition processes of different primary reference fuels. The results have shown that the formation of formaldehyde and its subsequent disappearance were closely related to the start of the low temperature and high temperature heat release processes, respectively. The formation of formaldehyde was more affected by the charge temperature than by the fuel concentration.
2011-09-13
Journal Article
2011-01-2176
Cho-Yu Lee, Hua Zhao, Tom Ma
In this paper, a novel cost-effective air hybrid powertrain concept for buses and commercial vehicles, Brunel Regenerative Engine Braking Device (RegenEBD) technology, is presented and its performance during the braking process is analysed using the Ricardo WAVE engine simulation programme. RegenEBD is designed to convert kinetic energy into pneumatic energy in the compressed air saved in an air tank. Its operation is achieved by using a production engine braking device and a proprietary intake system design. During the braking operation, the engine switches from the firing mode to the compressor mode by keeping the intake valves from fully closed throughout the four-strokes by installing the Variable Valve Exhaust Brake (VVEB) device on the intake valves. As a result, the induced air could be compressed through the opening gap of intake valves into the air tank through the modified intake system.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-1774
Y. Zhang, Hua Zhao, M. Ojapah, A. Cairns
Over recent years, in order to develop more efficient and cleaner gasoline engines, a number of new engine operating strategies have been proposed and many of them have been studied on different engines but there is a lack of different comparison between various operating strategies. In this work, a single cylinder direct injection gasoline engine equipped with an electro-hydraulic valvetrain system has been commissioned and used to achieve seven different operation modes, which are 4-stroke throttle-controlled SI, 4-stroke intake valve throttled SI, 4-stroke positive valve overlap SI, 4-stroke negative valve overlap CAI, 4-stroke exhaust rebreathing CAI, 2-stroke CAI and 2-stroke SI. Their performance and emission characteristics are presented and discussed.
2011-08-30
Journal Article
2011-01-1773
Y. Zhang, Hua Zhao, M. Ojapah, A. Cairns
A single cylinder direct injection gasoline engine has been developed and commissioned on a transient engine test bed in order to study different engine cycles and combustion modes with identical hardware and operating conditions. The engine can be operated in either 4-stroke cycle or 2-stroke cycle by means of an electro-hydraulic camless system. In addition, both spark ignition and controlled autoignition (CAI) combustion can be achieved. In this paper, effects of the injection timing on different CAI combustion modes are investigated, including the residual gas trapping and exhaust gas rebreathing CAI operations in 4-stroke mode, and also 2-stroke CAI operation, with a stoichiometric air fuel ratio and homogeneous charge used throughout. The performance and emission data are presented and analysed as a function of the injection timing. Results show that the charge cooling effect on the intake flow rate is dependent upon the in-cylinder temperature at the time of injection.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1408
Tao Chen, Hui Xie, Le Li, Weifei Yu, Zhihua Li, Hua Zhao
Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) technology is promising to reduce engine exhaust emissions and fuel consumption. However, it is still confronted with the problem of its narrow operation range that covers only the light and medium loads. Therefore, to expand the operation range of HCCI, mode switching between HCCI combustion and transition SI combustion is necessary, which may bring additional problems to be resolved, including load fluctuation and increasing the complexity of control strategy, etc. In this paper, a continuously adjustable load strategy is proposed for gasoline engines. With the application of the strategy, engine load can be adjusted continuously by the in-cylinder residual gas fraction in the whole operation range. In this research, hybrid combustion is employed to bridge the gaps between HCCI and traditional SI and thus realize smooth transition between different load points.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-1137
R. J. Osborne, J. Stokes, T. H. Lake, P. J. Carden, J. D. Mullineux, R. Helle-Lorentzen, J. C. Evans, M. R. Heikal, Y. Zhu, Hua Zhao, T. Ma
The pursuit of flexibility is a recurring theme in engine design and development. Engines that are able to switch between the two-stroke operating cycle and four-stroke operation promise a great leap in flexibility. Such 2S-4S engines could then continuously select the optimum operating mode - including HCCI/CAI combustion - for fuel efficiency, emissions or specific output. With recent developments in valvetrain technology, advanced boosting devices, direct fuel injection and engine control, the 2S-4S engine is an increasingly real prospect. The authors have undertaken a comprehensive feasibility study for 2S-4S gasoline engines. This study has encompassed concept and detailed design, design analysis, one-dimensional gas dynamics simulation, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics, and vehicle simulation. The resulting 2/4SIGHT concept engine is a 1.04 l in-line three-cylinder engine producing 230 Nm and 85 kW.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0183
Jing Qin, Hui Xie, Yan Zhang, Hua Zhao
One-dimensional engine simulation programmes are often used in the engine design and optimization studies. One of the key requirements of such a simulation programme is its ability to predict the heat release process during combustion. Such simulation software has built in it the heat release models for spark ignited premixed flame and compression ignited diesel combustion. The recent emergence of Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI) combustion, also known as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), has generated the need for a third type of heat release models for this new combustion process. In this paper, a heat release correlation for CAI combustion has been derived from extensive in-cylinder pressure data obtained from a Ricardo E6 single cylinder research engine and a multi-cylinder Port Fuel Injection (PFI) gasoline engine running with CAI combustion. The experimental data covered a wide range of air/fuel ratios, speed and percentage of residual gas.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0144
Li Cao, Hua Zhao, Xi Jiang, Navin Kalian
The Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) combustion, also known as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) was achieved by trapping residuals with early exhaust valve closure in conjunction with direct injection. Multi-cycle 3D engine simulations have been carried out for parametric study on four different injection timings, in order to better understand the effects of injection timings on in-cylinder mixing and CAI combustion. The full engine cycle simulation including complete gas exchange and combustion processes was carried out over several cycles in order to obtain the stable cycle for analysis. The combustion models used in the present study are the Shell auto-ignition model and the characteristic-time combustion model, which were modified to take the high level of EGR into consideration. A liquid sheet breakup spray model was used for the droplet breakup processes.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0132
Richard Standing, Navin Kalian, Tom Ma, Hua Zhao, Martin Wirth, Andreas Schamel
CAI-combustion was achieved in a 4-cylinder four-stroke gasoline DI engine, with all cylinders running in CAI-mode. Standard components were used, with the exception of the camshafts which had been modified in order to restrict the gas exchange process. Results shown in the paper are between a load of 1.45 - 2.65 bar, an engine speed of 1500rpm and at a lambda value of 1.2. As is typical with this type of combustion, reductions in emissions of NOx were recorded as well as a slight decrease in HC emissions, also there was a reduction in the brake specific fuel consumption. The effect that injection timing on factors such as start of combustion, combustion duration and heat release rate are also investigated.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0134
B. Leach, Hua Zhao, Y. Li, T. Ma
Controlled auto Ignition (CAI) combustion has great potential for reducing both NOx emissions and fuel consumption in IC engines and the application of direct injection technology to the CAI engine adds another dimension of control to the combustion process. In this work an air-assisted injection system was applied to an engine that used residual gas to initiate and control CAI combustion. Injections were performed at Exhaust valve closure (EVC), intake valve opening (IVO) and BDC of the intake/compression stroke and the effects on combustion phasing (i.e. ignition timing and burn duration), engine output, fuel consumption and exhaust emissions analyzed. Injection at EVC gave the best results in terms of engine output, operating range and combustion stability. Injection at IVO generally resulted in the lowest fuel consumption. It was found that injection timing is an effective means of controlling combustion phasing.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0915
K. Gill, C. Marriner, K. Sison, Hua Zhao
An experimental study has been carried out on the multiple fuel injection process and its effect on the mixing and combustion in a single cylinder diesel engine with optical access. The engine is equipped with a production type cylinder head and a high pressure common rail fuel system which comprises a directly driven high pressure fuel pump and a control system capable of 8 injections per stroke. The single cylinder optical engine could be operated lubrication-free for up to 5 minutes due to the application of special coating on the piston liner and careful design of the piston and extended cylinder block. The in-cylinder spray and combustion were visualized at 10,000 fps by a high-speed colour video camera and a copper vapour laser. The high-speed video recordings and in-cylinder pressure and heat release analysis for up to four fuel injections will be presented and discussed.
2005-04-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-0161
Amit Bhave, Markus Kraft, Fabian Mauss, Aaron Oakley, Hua Zhao
We present a computational tool to develop an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) - air-fuel ratio (AFR) operating range for homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines. A single cylinder Ricardo E-6 engine running in HCCI mode, with external EGR is simulated using an improved probability density function (PDF) based engine cycle model. For a base case, the in-cylinder temperature and unburned hydrocarbon emissions predicted by the model show a satisfactory agreement with measurements [Oakley et al., SAE Paper 2001-01-3606]. Furthermore, the model is applied to develop the operating range for various combustion parameters, emissions and engine parameters with respect to the air-fuel ratio and the amount of EGR used. The model predictions agree reasonably well with the experimental results for various parameters over the entire EGR-AFR operating range thus proving the robustness of the PDF based model.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0690
Yanzhao An, Shengping Teng, Xiang Li, Jing Qin, Hua Zhao, Zhang Song Zhan, Tie Gang Hu, Bin Liu, Jing Zhong
Abstract In the present study, we developed a reduced TRF-PAH chemical reaction mechanism consisted of iso-octane, n-heptane and toluene as gasoline surrogate fuels for GDI (gasoline direct injection) spark ignition engine combustion simulation. The reduced mechanism consists of 85 species and 232 reactions including 17 species and 40 reactions related to the PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) formation. The present mechanism was validated for extensive validations with experimental ignition delay times in shock tubes and laminar flame speeds in flat flame adiabatic burner for gasoline/air and TRF/air mixtures under various pressures, temperatures and equivalence ratios related to engine conditions. Good agreement was achieved for most of the measurement. Mole fraction profiles of PAHs for n-heptane flame were also simulated and the experimental trends were reproduced well.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0737
Tao Chen, Hui Xie, Hongtao Li, Xueqing Fu, Hua Zhao
Abstract Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI), also known as Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), has been the subject of extensive research because of their ability to providing simultaneous reduction in fuel consumption and NOx emissions in a gasoline engine. However, due to its limited operation range, combustion mode switching between CAI and spark ignition (SI) combustion is essential to cover the overall operational range of a gasoline engine for passenger car applications. Previous research has shown that the SI-CAI hybrid combustion has the potential to control the ignition timing and heat release process during both steady state and transient operations. However, it was found that the SI-CAI hybrid combustion process is often characterized with large cycle-to-cycle variations, due to the flame instability at high dilution conditions.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1819
Pin Lu, Hua Zhao, Mohammad Reza Herfatmanesh
Gasoline Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is an advanced combustion concept to simultaneously reduce the NOx and soot emissions whilst retaining high engine efficiencies. In order to have a better understanding of gasoline PPC operation in terms of mixture formation, combustion and emissions characteristics, the investigation was carried out at 1200 bar injection pressure using the combination of thermodynamic and optical diagnostic analysis in a single cylinder common rail fuel injection engine with optical access. The PPC operation was achieved with a combination of high dilution and higher intake charge temperature at part-load condition using primary reference fuel (PRF). Split injections of two fuel distribution strategies (50:50 and 70:30) were studied.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1818
Kangwoo Seo, Hua Zhao
In order to investigate feasibility of DME (Di-methyl ether) assisted gasoline CAI (controlled-auto ignition) combustion, direct DME injection is employed to act as the ignition source to trigger the auto-ignition combustion of premixed gasoline/air mixture with high temperature exhaust gas. Intake re-breathing valve strategy is adopted to obtain internal exhaust recirculation (EGR) that regulates heat release rate and ignitability of the premixed gasoline and air mixture. The effects of intake re-breathing valve timing and 2nd DME injection timing of different split injection ratios were investigated and discussed in terms of combustion characteristics, emission and efficiencies. The analyses showed that re-breathing intake valve timing had a large effect on the operation range of CAI combustion due to EGR and intake temperature variation.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1798
Ian May, Alasdair Cairns, Hua Zhao, Vinicius Pedrozo, Hoi C. Wong, Steve Whelan, Paul Bennicke
An experimental study has been carried out with the end goal of minimizing engine-out methane emissions with Premixed Micro Pilot Combustion (PMPC) in a natural gas-diesel Dual-Fuel™ engine. The test engine used is a heavy-duty single cylinder engine with high pressure common rail diesel injection as well as port fuel injection of natural gas. Multiple variables were examined, including injection timings, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) percentages, and rail pressure for diesel, conventional Dual-Fuel, and PMPC Dual-Fuel combustion modes. The responses investigated were pressure rise rate, engine-out emissions, heat release and indicated specific fuel consumption. PMPC reduces methane slip when compared to conventional Dual-Fuel and improves emissions and fuel efficiency at the expense of higher cylinder pressure.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1794
Yan Zhang, Macklini DallaNora, Hua Zhao
Controlled Auto Ignition (CAI), also known as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), is one of the most promising combustion technologies to reduce the fuel consumption and NOx emissions. In order to take advantage of the inherent ability to retain a large and varied amount of residual at part-load condition and its potential to achieve extreme engine downsizing of a poppet valve engine running in the 2-stroke cycle, a single cylinder 4-valves camless direct injection gasoline engine has been developed and employed to investigate the CAI combustion process in the 2-stroke cycle mode. The CAI combustion is initiated by trapped residual gases from the adjustable scavenging process enabled by the variable intake and exhaust valve timings. In addition, the boosted intake air is used to provide the in-cylinder air/fuel mixture for maximum combustion efficiency.
2014-10-01
Journal Article
2014-01-9051
Jun Ma, Hua Zhao, Paul Freeland, Martyn Hawley, Jun Xia
In order to optimize the 2-stroke uniflow engine performance on vehicle applications, numerical analysis has been introduced, 3D CFD model has been built for the optimization of intake charge organization. The scavenging process was investigated and the intake port design details were improved. Then the output data from 3D CFD calculation were applied to a 1D engine model to process the analysis on engine performance. The boost system optimization of the engine has been carried out also. Furthermore, a vehicle model was also set up to investigate the engine in-vehicle performance.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1970
Jun Ma, Hua Zhao
Engine downsizing of the spark ignition gasoline engine is recognized as one of the most effective approaches to improve the fuel economy of a passenger car. However, further engine downsizing beyond 50% in a 4-stroke gasoline engine is limited by the occurrence of abnormal combustion events as well as much greater thermal and mechanical loads. In order to achieve aggressive engine downsizing, a boosted uniflow scavenged direct injection gasoline (BUSDIG) engine concept has been proposed and researched by means of CFD simulation and demonstration in a single cylinder engine. In this paper, the intake port design on the in-cylinder flow field and gas exchange characteristics of the uniflow 2-stroke cycle was investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). In particular, the port orientation on the in-cylinder swirl, the trapping efficiency, charging efficiency and scavenging efficiency was analyzed in details.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1049
Xinyan Wang, Jun Ma, Hua Zhao
Abstract The 2-stroke engine has great potential for aggressive engine downsizing due to its double firing frequency which allows lower indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) and peak in-cylinder pressure with the same output toque compared to the 4-stroke engine. With the aid of new engine technologies, e.g. direct injection, boost and variable valve trains, the drawbacks of traditional 2-stroke engine, e.g. low durability and high emissions, can be resolved in a Boosted Uniflow Scavenged Direct Injection Gasoline (BUSDIG) engine. Compared to the loop-flow or cross-flow engines, the BUSDIG engine, where intake ports are integrated to the cylinder liner and controlled by the movement of piston top while exhaust valves are placed in the cylinder head, can achieve excellent scavenging performance and be operated with high boost.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1207
Quan Liu, Alasdair Cairns, Hua Zhao, Mohammadreza Anbari Attar, Luke Cruff, Hugh Blaxill
Abstract The work was concerned with visualisation of the charge homogeneity and cyclic variations within the planar fuel field near the spark plug in an optical spark ignition engine fitted with an outwardly opening central direct fuel injector. Specifically, the project examined the effects of fuel type and injection settings, with the overall view to understanding some of the key mechanisms previously identified as leading to particulate formation in such engines. The three fuels studied included a baseline iso-octane, which was directly compared to two gasoline fuels containing 10% and 85% volume of ethanol respectively. The engine was a bespoke single cylinder with Bowditch style optical access through a flat piston crown. Charge stratification was studied over a wide spectrum of injection timings using the Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) technique, with additional variation in charge temperature due to injection also estimated when viable using a two-line PLIF approach.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1205
Kang Xu, Hui Xie, Minggang Wan, Tao Chen, Hua Zhao
The goal of this research was to study and quantify the effect of exhaust valve timing and residual gas dilution on in-cylinder flow patterns, flame propagation and heat release characteristics in a spark ignition engine. Experiments were carried out in a recently developed single cylinder optical engine. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was applied to measuring and evaluating the in-cylinder flow field. Detailed analysis of flame images combined with heat release data was presented for several engine operating conditions, giving insight into the combustion process in terms of visible flame area and flame expansion speed. Results from PIV measurement indicates that the limited alteration of the in-cylinder bulk flow could be observed with the variation of exhaust valve timing. The in-cylinder fluctuating kinetic energies and their Coefficient of Variations (COVs) decrease with the advance of the exhaust valve timing.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3738
Hui Xie, Lin Yang, Jing Qin, Rui Gao, Hong-Guo Zhu, Bang-Quan He, Hua Zhao
The present paper aims to investigate the influence of spark ignition on CAI combustion based on internal EGR strategy. Controlled Auto-ignition (CAI) combustion is facilitated in a Ricardo single cylinder engine with a pair of special camshafts, which valve lift and cam profile are modified to trap enough hot residuals. Operation regions and other detailed combustion characteristics of the CAI engine operation are analyzed and compared between pure CAI mode and the CAI mode with assisted spark ignition. The results show that spark ignition can play an important role in controlling CAI combustion ignition in low load boundary region. The low temperature chemical reaction process is shortened and the auto ignition timing is advanced due to the spark discharge. Meantime, lower fuel consumption and cycle-to-cycle variations can be achieved.
2005-10-24
Technical Paper
2005-01-3736
Bang-Quan He, Hui Xie, Yan Zhang, Jing Qin, Hua Zhao
To achieve homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in the range of low speeds and loads, special camshafts with low intake/exhaust cam lift and short intake/exhaust cam duration were designed. The camshafts were mounted in a Ricardo Hydra four-stroke single cylinder port fuel injection gasoline engine. HCCI combustion was achieved by controlling the amount of trapped residuals from previous cycle through negative valve overlap. The results show that indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) depends on valve timings, engine speeds and lambda. Early exhaust valve closing (EVC) timings result in high residual fractions in the cylinder and low air mass sucked into the cylinder. As a result, combustion duration increases, IMEP and peak pressure decrease. However, pumping losses decrease. High engine speed has the similar effect on HCCI combustion characteristics as early EVC timings do. But inlet valve opening timings have slight effect on IMEP compared to EVC timings.
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