Criteria

Text:
Author:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 52
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1073
Akira Kikusato, Kusaka Jin, Yasuhiro Daisho
The first objective of this work is to develop a numerical simulation model of the spark ignited (SI) engine combustion, taking into account knock avoidance and heat transfer between in-cylinder gas and combustion chamber wall. Secondly, the model was utilized to investigate the potential of reducing heat losses by applying a heat insulation coating to the combustion chamber wall, thereby improving engine thermal efficiency. A reduction in heat losses is related to important operating factors of improving SI engine thermal efficiency. However, reducing heat losses tends to accompany increased combustion chamber wall temperatures, resulting in the onset of knock in SI engines. Thus, the numerical model was intended to make it possible to investigate the interaction of the heat losses and knock occurrence. The present paper consists of Part 1 and 2.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1066
Akira Kikusato, Katsuya Terahata, Kusaka Jin, Yasuhiro Daisho
Abstract The objective of this work is to develop a numerical simulation model of spark ignited (SI) engine combustion and thereby to investigate the possibility of reducing heat losses and improving thermal efficiency by applying a low thermal conductivity and specific heat material, so-called heat insulation coating, to the combustion chamber wall surface. A reduction in heat loss is very important for improving SI engine thermal efficiency. However, reducing heat losses tends to increase combustion chamber wall temperatures, resulting in the onset of knock in SI engines. Thus, the numerical model made it possible to investigate the interaction of the heat losses and knock occurrence and to optimize spark ignition timing to achieve higher efficiency. Part 2 of this work deals with the investigations on the effects of heat insulation coatings applied to the combustion chamber wall surfaces on heat losses, knock occurrence and thermal efficiency.
2012-09-10
Technical Paper
2012-01-1745
Wataru Matsui, Tetsu Suzuki, Yasuo Ohta, Soichiro Ito, Yo Tanaka, Yutaka Kikuchi, Yasuhiro Daisho, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii
N₂O is known to have a significantly high global warming potential. We measured N₂O emissions in engine-bench tests by changing the NO/NH₃ ratio and exhaust gas temperature at the oxidation catalyst inlet in a heavy-duty diesel engine equipped with a urea SCR (selective catalytic reduction) system. The results showed that the peak N₂O production ratio occurred at an exhaust gas temperature of around 200°C and the maximum value was 84%. Moreover, the N₂O production ratio increased with increasing NO/NH₃. Thus, we concluded that N₂O is produced via the NO branching reaction. Based on our results, two methods were proposed to decrease N₂O formation. At low temperatures ~200°C, NO should be reduced by controlling diesel combustion to lower the contribution of NO to N₂O production. This is essential because the SCR system cannot reduce NOx at low temperatures.
2012-09-10
Technical Paper
2012-01-1651
Akira Kikusato, Hiroyuki Fukasawa, Kazutoshi Nomura, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Natural gas is an attractive alternative fuel for internal combustion engines. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion is considered to be one of the most promising measures for increasing thermal efficiency and reducing emissions, but it is difficult to control and stabilize its ignition and combustion processes. This paper describes an experimental study of natural gas combustion utilizing two types of ignition assistance. Spark assistance, which is used for conventional spark ignition (SI) engines, and pilot diesel injection, hereinafter called diesel pilot, which generates multiple ignition points by using a small injection of diesel that accounts for 2% of the total heat release for the cycle. The performance of these two approaches was compared with respect to various combustion characteristics when burning homogeneous natural gas mixtures at a high compression ratio.
2012-09-10
Technical Paper
2012-01-1637
XiaoDan Cui, Teagun Kim, Yusuke Fujii, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Manida Tongroon, Nuwong Chollacoop
The objective of the present research is to investigate the effects on diesel engine combustion and NOx and PM emission characteristics in case of blending the ordinary diesel fuel with biodiesel in passenger car diesel engines. Firstly, we conducted experiments to identify the combustion and emissions characteristics in a modern diesel engine complying with the EURO 4 emission standard. Then, we developed a numerical simulation model to explain and generalize biodiesel combustion phenomena in detail and generalize emission characteristics. The experimental and simulation results are useful to reduce biodiesel emissions by controlling engine operating and design parameters in the diesel engine.
2015-11-17
Journal Article
2015-32-0711
Sok Ratnak, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Kei Yoshimura, Kenjiro Nakama
Primary work is to investigate premixed laminar flame propagation in a constant volume chamber of iso-octane/air combustion. Experimental and numerical results are investigated by comparing flame front displacements under lean to rich conditions. As the laminar flame depends on equivalence ratio, temperature, and pressure conditions, it is a main property for chemical reaction mechanism validation. Firstly, one-dimensional laminar flame burning velocities are predicted in order to validate a reduced chemical reaction mechanism. A set of laminar burning velocities with pressure, temperature, and mixture equivalence ratio dependences are combined into a 3D-CFD calculation to compare the predicted flame front displacements with that of experiments. It is found that the reaction mechanism is well validated under the coupled 1D-3D combustion calculations.
2015-11-17
Journal Article
2015-32-0715
Beini Zhou, Masahiro Horikoshi, Akira Kikusato, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Kiyotaka Sato, Hidefumi Fujimoto
A mixed time-scale subgrid large eddy simulation was used to simulate mixture formation, combustion and soot formation under the influence of turbulence during diesel engine combustion. To account for the effects of engine wall heat transfer on combustion, the KIVA code's standard wall model was replaced to accommodate more realistic boundary conditions. This were carried out by implementing the non-isothermal wall model of Angelberger et al. with modifications and incorporating the log law from Pope's method to account for the wall surface roughness. Soot and NOx emissions predicted with the new model are compared to experimental data acquired under various EGR conditions.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1847
Akira Kikusato, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D-CFD) code was combined with a detailed combustion chamber heat transfer model. The established model allowed not only prediction of instantaneous combustion chamber wall surface temperature distributions in practical calculation time but also investigation of the characteristics of combustion, emissions and heat losses affected by the wall temperature distributions. Although zero-dimensional combustion analysis can consider temporal changes in the heat transfer coefficient and in-cylinder gas temperature, it cannot take into account the effect of interactions between spatially distributed charge and wall temperatures. In contrast, 3D-CFD analysis can consider temporal and spatial changes in both parameters. However, in most zero-/multi- dimensional combustion analyses, wall temperatures are assumed to be temporally constant and spatially homogeneous.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1884
Hisashi Miyai, Kyosuke Iwaya, Akira Kikusato, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Hisaharu Nakashima, Yoichi Kawaguchi, Daisuke Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki Hasegawa
Natural gas is a promising alternative fuel for internal combustion engines because of its clean combustion characteristics and abundant reserves. However, it has several disadvantages due to its low energy density and low thermal efficiency at low loads. Thus, to assist efforts to improve the thermal efficiency of spark-ignited (SI) engines operating on natural gas and to minimize test procedures, a numerical simulation model was developed to predict and optimize the performance of a turbocharged test engine, considering flame propagation, occurrence of knock and ignition timing. The numerical results correlate well with empirical data, and show that increasing compression ratios and retarding the intake valve closing (IVC) timing relative to selected baseline conditions could effectively improve thermal efficiency. In addition, employing moderate EGR ratios is also effective for avoiding knock.
2015-03-10
Technical Paper
2015-01-0011
Sok Ratnak, Kohei Katori, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Kei Yoshimura, Nakama Kenjiro
Abstract The objective of this paper is to investigate the potential of lean burn combustion to improve the thermal efficiency of spark ignition engine. Experiments used a single cylinder gasoline spark ignition engine fueled with primary reference fuel of octane number 90, running at 4000 revolution per minute and at wide open throttle. Experiments were conducted at constant fueling rate and in order to lean the mixture, more air is introduced by boosted pressure from stoichiometric mixture to lean limit while maintaining the high output engine torque as possible. Experimental results show that the highest thermal efficiency is obtained at excess air ratio of 1.3 combined with absolute boosted pressure of 117 kPa. Three dimensional computational fluid dynamic simulation with detailed chemical reactions was conducted and compared with results obtained from experiments as based points.
2015-03-10
Technical Paper
2015-01-0015
Sok Ratnak, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Abstract This paper aims to validate chemical kinetic mechanisms of surrogate gasoline three components fuel by calculating one-dimensional laminar burning velocity of iso-octane/air mixture. Next, the application of level-set method on premixed combustion without consideration the effect of turbulence eddies on flame front is also studied in three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (3D-CFD) simulation. In the 3D CFD simulation, there is an option to calculate laminar burning velocity by using empirical correlations, however it is applicable only for particular initial pressure and temperature in spark ignition engine cases. One-dimensional burning velocities from lean to rich of iso-octane/air mixture are calculated by using CHEMKIN-PRO with detailed chemistry and transport phenomena as a function of different equivalence ratios, different unburnt temperature and pressure ranges.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-2014
Hirotaka Nishiyama, Yo Tanaka, Taiki Adachi, Syunsuke Kawamura, Yasuhiro Daisho, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii, Kyohei Yamaguchi
Urea SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) exhaust after-treatment systems are one of the most promising measures to reduce NOx emissions from diesel engines. Both Cu-zeolite (Cu-SCR) and Fe-zeolite (Fe-SCR) urea SCR systems have been studied extensively but not many detailed studies have been conducted on the combination of both systems. Thus, we carried out studies on such Combined-SCR systems and their capability to reduce NOx under various engine operating conditions. We also conducted transient engine tests using different catalyst systems to compare their performance. The results show that combined-SCR systems can reduce NOx more effectively than Fe-SCR or Cu-SCR alone. The best NOx reduction performance was achieved at a Cu ratio of 0.667 (i.e. Fe: Cu =1: 2). Combined-SCR thus apparently benefits from the characteristics of both Cu-SCR and Fe-SCR, allowing it to reduce NOx over a wide range of operating conditions.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-2010
Toru Uenishi, Eijiro Tanaka, Genki Shigeno, Takao Fukuma, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Experimental and numerical studies were conducted on diesel particulate filters (DPFs) under different soot loading conditions and DPF configurations. Pressure drops across DPFs with various mean pore diameters loaded with soots having different mean particle diameters were measured by introducing exhaust gases from a 2.2 liter inline four-cylinder, TCI diesel engine designed for use in passenger cars. A mechanistic hypothesis was then proposed to explain the observed trends, accounting for the effects of the soot loading regime in the wall and the soot cake layer on the pressure drop. This hypothesis was used to guide the development and validation of a numerical model for predicting the pressure drop in the DPF. The relationship between the permeability and the porosity of the wall and soot cake layer was modeled under various soot loading conditions.
2008-10-06
Technical Paper
2008-01-2498
Yutaka Murata, Sadahito Tokui, Soichiro Watanabe, Yasuhiro Daisho, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii
A urea SCR system was combined with a DPF system to reduce NOx and PM in a four liters turbocharged with intercooler diesel engine. Significant reduction in NOx was observed at low exhaust gas temperatures by increasing NH3 adsorption quantity in the SCR catalyst. Control logic of the NH3 adsorption quantity for transient operation was developed based on the NH3 adsorption characteristics on the SCR catalyst. It has been shown that NOx can be reduced by 75% at the average SCR inlet gas temperature of 158 deg.C by adopting the NH3 adsorption quantity control in the JE05 Mode.
2006-11-13
Technical Paper
2006-32-0034
Kenjiro Nakama, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
To suppress knock in small gasoline engines, the coolant flow of a single-cylinder engine was improved by using two methods: a multi-dimensional knock prediction method combining a Flamelet model with a simple chemical kinetics model, and a method for predicting combustion chamber wall temperature based on a thermal fluid calculation that coupled the engine coolant and the engine structure (engine head, cylinder block, and head gasket). Through these calculations as well as the measurement of wall temperatures and the analysis of combustion by experiments, the effects of wall temperature distribution and consequent unburnt gas temperature distribution on knock onset timing and location were examined. Furthermore, a study was made to develop a method for cooling the head side, which was more effective to suppress knock: the head gasket shape was modified to change the coolant flow and thereby improve the distribution of wall temperatures on the head side.
2005-05-11
Technical Paper
2005-01-2132
Daisuke Kawano, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii, Yuichi Goto, Matsuo Odaka, Yutaka Murata, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is effective for the simultaneous reduction of soot and NOx emissions in diesel engine. In general, high octane number fuels (gasoline components or gaseous fuels) are used for HCCI operation, because these fuels briefly form lean homogeneous mixture because of long ignition delay and high volatility. However, it is necessary to improve injection systems, when these high octane number fuels are used in diesel engine. In addition, the difficulty of controlling auto-ignition timing must be resolved. On the other hand, HCCI using diesel fuel (diesel HCCI) also needs ignition control, because diesel fuel which has a low octane number causes the early ignition before TDC. The purpose of this study is the ignition and combustion control of diesel HCCI. The effects of parameters (injection timing, injection pressure, internal/external EGR, boost pressure, and variable valve timing (VVT)) on the ignition timing of diesel HCCI were investigated.
2006-04-03
Technical Paper
2006-01-0203
Yutaka Murata, Jin Kusaka, Matsuo Odaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Daisuke Kawano, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii, Yuichi Goto
A variable valve timing (VVT) mechanism was applied to achieve premixed diesel combustion at higher load for low emissions and high thermal efficiency in a light duty diesel engine. By means of late intake valve closing (LIVC), compressed gas temperatures near the top dead center are lowered, thereby preventing too early ignition and increasing ignition delay to enhance fuel-air mixing. The variability of effective compression ratio has significant potential for ignition timing control of conventional diesel fuel mixtures. At the same time, the expansion ratio is kept constant to ensure thermal efficiency. Combining the control of LIVC, EGR, supercharging systems and high-pressure fuel injection equipment can simultaneously reduce NOx and smoke. The NOx and smoke suppression mechanism in the premixed diesel combustion was analyzed using the 3D-CFD code combined with detailed chemistry.
2005-09-11
Technical Paper
2005-24-051
Jin Kusaka, Nobuhiko Horie, Yasuhiro Daisho, V. I. Golovichev, Shigeki Nakayama
To facilitate research and development of diesel engines, the universal numerical code for predicting diesel combustion has been favored for the past decade. In this paper, the finite-rate elementary chemical reactions, sometimes called the detailed chemical reactions, are introduced into the KIVA-3V code through the use of the Partially Stirred Reactor (PaSR) model with the KH-RT break-up, modified collision and velocity interpolation models. Outcomes were such that the predicted pressure histories have favorable agreements with the measurements of single and double injection cases in the diesel engine for use in passenger cars. Thus, it is demonstrated that the present model will be a useful tool for predicting ignition and combustion characteristics encountered in the cylinder.
2006-10-16
Technical Paper
2006-01-3308
Ryota Nakayama, Tazuki Watanabe, Keishi Takada, Matsuo Odaka, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Urea-SCR system has a high NOx reduction potential in the steady-state diesel engine operation. In complicated transient operations, however, there are certain problems with the urea-SCR system in that NOx reduction performance degrades and adsorbed NH3 would be emitted. Here, optimum urea injection methods and exhaust bypass control to overcome these problems are studied. This exhaust bypass control enables NO/NOx ratio at the inlet of SCR catalyst to be decreased widely, which prevents over production of NO2 at the pre-oxidation catalyst. Steady-state and simple transient engine tests were conducted to clarify NOx reduction characteristics when optimum urea injection pattern and exhaust bypass control were applied. In simple transient test, only the engine load was rapidly changed for obtaining the fundamental knowledge concerning the effect of those techniques.
2008-04-14
Journal Article
2008-01-0644
Yutaka Murata, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Daisuke Kawano, Hisakazu Suzuki, Hajime Ishii, Yuichi Goto
A variable valve timing (VVT) mechanism has been applied in a high-speed direct injection (HSDI) diesel engine. The effective compression ratio (εeff) was lowered by means of late intake valve closing (LIVC), while keeping the expansion ratio constant. Premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion, adopting the Miller-cycle, was experimentally realized and numerically analyzed. Significant improvements of NOx and soot emissions were achieved for a wide range of engine speeds and loads, frequently used in a transient mode test. The operating range of the Miller-PCCI combustion has been expanded up to an IMEP of 1.30 MPa.
1994-10-01
Technical Paper
941909
Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Takeshi Saito, Ryoji Kihara
A new type of fuel injection nozzle, called a “slit nozzle,” has been developed to improve poor ignitability and to stabilize combustion under low load conditions in direct-injection methanol diesel engines manufactured for medium-duty trucks. This nozzle has a single oblong vent like a slit. Engine test results indicate that the slit nozzle can improve combustion and thermal efficiency, especially at low loads and no load. This can be explained by the fact that the slit nozzle forms a more highly concentrated methanol spray around the glow-plug than do multi-hole nozzles. As a result, this nozzle improves flame propagation.
1995-02-01
Technical Paper
950465
Yasuhiro Daisho, Toru Yaeo, Takahisa Koseki, Takeshi Saito, Ryoji Kihara, Edwin N. Quiros
Dual-fuel operation of a direct-injection diesel engine with natural gas fuel can yield a high thermal efficiency almost comparable to the diesel operation at higher loads. The dual-fuel operation, however, at lower loads inevitably suffers from lower thermal efficiency and higher unburned fuel. To improve this problem, engine tests were carried out on a variety of engine parameters including diesel fuel injection timing advance, intake throttling and hot and cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). It was found that diesel injection timing advance gave little improvement in thermal efficiency and increased NOx. Intake throttling promoted better combustion and shortened its duration with a consequent improvement in efficiency at higher natural gas fractions. Hot EGR raised thermal efficiency, reduced smoke levels, and maintained low NOx levels. Cooled EGR reduced NOx emissions but lowered thermal efficiency.
1992-02-01
Technical Paper
920117
Noboru Uchida, Yasuhiro Daisho, Takeshi Saito
A study has been made of an automotive direct injection diesel engine designed to reduce exhaust emissions, particularly NOx and particulates, without performance deterioration. Special emphasis has been placed on air-fuel mixing conditions controlled by the fuel injection rate, the intake swirl ratio, and the intake boost pressure. By means of increasing the injection rate, ignition delay can be shortened enough to improve particulate emissions at retarded injection timings. Enhancing the intake swirl velocity contributes to the reduction of soot emission in spite of the deterioration of NOx emission. Supercharging can favorably enhance diffusion combustion resulting in improved fuel economy for retarded injection timings and reduced emissions. As a result, a good compromise can be achieved between fuel economy and exhaust emissions by increasing the injection rate along with retarding the injection timing. Supercharging was found to be more favorable than swirl enhancement.
1996-10-01
Technical Paper
961935
Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Ryoji Kihara, Takeshi Saito
A numerical model has been developed to predict the formation of NOx and formaldehyde in the combustion and post-combustion zones of a methanol DI engine. For this purpose, a methanol-air mixture model combined with a full kinetics model has been introduced, taking into account 39 species with their 157 related elementary reactions. Through these kinetic simulations, a concept is proposed for optimizing methanol combustion and reducing exhaust emissions.
2000-06-12
Technical Paper
2000-05-0332
Katsuhiko Wakabayashi, Satoshi Kabe, Yushi Kamiya, Kazuyuki Narusawa, Akira Yamanaka, Yasuhiro Daisho, Takeshi Saitho
A very small electric vehicle, powered with a proton exchange membrane fuel cell operating on reformed methanol, is planned and designed in this paper to solve social problems associated with air pollution and heavy traffic conditions. Next, the driving range is simulated by the experimental data of the output and the performance. The conclusions of this paper are as follows: (1) The power train employing the fuel cell and compact brushless DC motor serves to realize high efficiency and reduce weight for energy saving.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-3175
Akinori Morishima, Tomoyuki Narushima, Haruki Moriwaki, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Experimental and numerical studies on PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) and PM (Particulate Matters) formed in the fuel rich mixture have been conducted. In the experiment, neat n-heptane and n-heptane with benzene 25 % by weight were chosen as test fuels. In-cylinder gases produced by the fuel-rich HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) combustion were directly sampled and analyzed by the use of GC/MS (Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectro- metry), and PM emission was also measured by PM sampling system to reveal characteristics of PM formation. Numerical study has been also carried out using a zero dimensional combustion model combined with detailed chemistry. Furthermore, simple surface growth of soot particles was integrated into a detailed chemical kinetic model, and validated with the experimental data.
2003-10-27
Technical Paper
2003-01-3158
Keishi Takada, Futoshi Yoshimura, Yasushi Ohga, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
In this study, we selected four unregulated emissions species, formaldehyde, benzene, 1,3-butadiene and benzo[a]pyrene to research the emission characteristics of these unregulated components experimentally. The engine used was a water-cooled, 8-liter, 6-cylinder, 4-stroke-cycle, turbocharged DI diesel engine with a common rail fuel injection system manufactured for the use of medium-duty trucks, and the fuel used was JIS second-class light gas oil, which is commercially available as diesel fuel. The results of experiments indicate as follows: formaldehyde tends to be emitted under the low load condition, while 1,3-butadiene is emitted at the low engine speed. This is believed to be because 1,3-butadiene decomposes in a short time, and the exhaust gas stays much longer in a cylinder under the low speed condition than under the high engine speed one. Benzene is emitted under the low load condition, as it is easily oxidized in high temperature.
2003-09-15
Technical Paper
2003-32-0003
Kenjiro Nakama, Eiji Murase, Masahito Imada, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Swirl injector spray at high fuel temperatures has unique characteristics [1][2][3][4] compared to normal fuel temperature spray such as strong penetration and narrow spray width. These characteristics have a possibility for improving fuel consumption and exhaust emission at the cold start condition. Thus, Swirl injector spray at high fuel temperature conditions was modeled in a CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) code by using a multi components fuel evaporation model and other spray sub-models to predict the mixture formation process at the cold start condition. Results show that, high temperature fuel decreases wall film amount and increases vapor amount. It can be concluded that high temperature fuel has the possibility for improving fuel consumption and exhaust emission at the cold start condtion.
2003-03-03
Technical Paper
2003-01-2011
Makoto Kato, Hiroaki Yasuzawa, Jun Hasegawa, Yasuhiro Daisho, Ryoji Kihara, Jin Kusaka
An experimental ultra lightweight compact vehicle named “the Waseda Future Vehicle” has been designed and developed, aiming at a simultaneous achievement of low exhaust gas emissions, high fuel economy and driving performance. The vehicle is powered by a dual-type hybrid system having a SI engine, electric motor and generator. A high performance lithium-ion battery unit is used for electricity storage. A variety of driving cycles were reproduced using the hybrid vehicle on a chassis dynamometer. By changing the logics and parameters in the electronic control unit (ECU) of the engine, a significant improvement in emissions was possible, achieving a very high fuel economy of 34 km/h at the Japanese 10-15 drive mode. At the same time, a numerical simulation model has been developed to predict fuel economy. This would be very useful in determining design factors and optimizing operating conditions in the hybrid power system.
2003-05-19
Technical Paper
2003-01-1793
Yuko Mito, Daisuke Tanaka, Seang Wock Lee, Yasuhiro Daisho, Jin Kusaka
To improve urban air pollution, stringent emissions regulations for heavy-duty diesel engines have been proposed and will become effective in Japan, the EU, and the United States in a few years. To comply with such future regulations, it is critical to investigate the effects of intake and injection parameters and fuel properties on engine performance, efficiency and emissions characteristics, associated with the use of aftertreatment systems. An experimental study was carried out to identify such effects. In addition, the KIVA-3 code was used to gain insight into cylinder events. The results showed improvements in NOx-Smoke and BSFC trade-offs at high-pressure injection in conjunction with EGR and supercharging.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 52

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: