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CURRENT
2012-04-30
Standard
J1114_201204
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for passenger car and truck applications but it may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications.
HISTORICAL
1977-06-01
Standard
J1114_197706
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for passenger car and truck applications but it may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications.
2017-05-11
WIP Standard
J1114
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for passenger car and truck applications but it may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications.
HISTORICAL
2005-08-04
Standard
J1114_200508
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for passenger car and truck applications but it may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications.
HISTORICAL
1989-11-01
Standard
J1114_198911
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for passenger car and truck applications but it may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications.
HISTORICAL
2000-06-06
Standard
J1114_200006
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for passenger car and truck applications but it may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications.
HISTORICAL
1997-08-01
Standard
J1737_199708
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for the determination of the losses of hydrocarbon fluids, by permeation through component walls as well as through 'microleaks' at interfaces of assembled components while controlling temperature and pressure independently of each other. This is achieved in a recirculating system in which liquids which are transported through walls and joints are collected by a controlled flow of nitrogen (dry) and adsorbed by activated charcoal.
HISTORICAL
2004-11-17
Standard
J1737_200411
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for the determination of the losses of hydrocarbon fluids, by permeation through component walls as well as through 'microleaks' at interfaces of assembled components while controlling temperature and pressure independently of each other. This is achieved in a recirculating system in which liquids which are transported through walls and joints are collected by a controlled flow of nitrogen (dry) and adsorbed by activated charcoal.
CURRENT
2013-05-14
Standard
J1737_201305
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended for the determination of the losses of hydrocarbon fluids, by permeation through component walls as well as through "microleaks" at interfaces of assembled components while controlling temperature and pressure independently of each other. This is achieved in a recirculating system in which elements of a test fuel that permeate through the walls of a test specimen and migrate through the interfaces are transported by a controlled flow of dry nitrogen to a point where they are measured. That measurement point is a device, such as a canister containing activated charcoal or other means of collection or accumulation where the hydrocarbon losses are then measured by weight change or analyzed by some other suitable means.
HISTORICAL
1994-12-01
Standard
J1747_199412
This SAE Information Report is intended to convey the test methods developed for use in testing with methanol and gasoline blends. Corrosion testing of metals has a long and varied history. In spite of the problems inherent in extrapolating results of accelerated tests on standard specimens to actual field durability, engineers have been able, to a large extent, to rely on these results in making materials selection decisions. However, these tests have generally employed aqueous media and are not strictly applicable to the use of organic chemical media. With methanol-gasoline fuel blends and their high electrical conductivity relative to gasoline, the relevance of the historical database is lost. Therefore, to allow rapid build-up of a new database, several corrosion test procedures have been reviewed and amended where appropriate.
CURRENT
2002-03-26
Standard
J1664_200203
The scope of this SAE Information Report is the liquid fuel containment system for gasoline or flexible fuels (up to 85% methanol in gasoline), along with their associated vapors, as designed for use on passenger cars and light trucks. For purposes of this document, fuel containment addresses the fuel tank and components that are directly attached to the fuel tank. These components may include the filler neck, tank, fill vent tube, fuel cap, pump-sender, and rollover control valve closure seals, insofar as they act as closure or containment mechanisms. Emphasis will be on fuel containment and the required system closures. Furthermore, emphasis will be placed on design recommendations as they relate to performance. Mounting and shielding of the "system" components are only included to the extent they affect the containment aspects.
CURRENT
2000-01-10
Standard
J1681_200001
This SAE Recommended Practice presents recommendations for test fluids that can be used to simulate real world fuels. The use of standardized test fluids is required in order to limit the variability found in commercial fuels and fluids. Commercial fuels can vary substantially between manufacturers, batches, seasons, and geographic location. Further, standardized test fluids are universally available and will promote consistent test results for materials testing. Therefore, this document Explains commercial automotive fuel components Defines standardized components of materials test fluids Defines a nomenclature for test fluids Describes preparations for test fluids and Recommends fluids for testing fuel system materials The test fluid compositions specified in Section 7 of this document are recommended solely for evaluating materials.
2008-05-07
WIP Standard
J1681
This SAE Recommended Practice presents recommendations for test fluids that can be used to simulate real world fuels. The use of standardized test fluids is required in order to limit the variability found in commercial fuels and fluids. Commercial fuels can vary substantially between manufacturers, batches, seasons, and geographic location. Further, standardized test fluids are universally available and will promote consistent test results for materials testing. Therefore, this document: a. Explains commercial automotive fuel components b. Defines standardized components of materials test fluids c. Defines a nomenclature for test fluids d. Describes preparations for test fluids and e. Recommends fluids for testing fuel system materials The test fluid compositions specified in Section 7 of this document are recommended solely for evaluating materials.
2015-04-10
WIP Standard
J1748
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to determining worst-case fuel, conditioning test specimens in worst-case fuel(s) prior to testing, individual tests for properties of polymers exposed to methanol-gasoline fuel mixtures. The determination of equilibrium, as well as typical calculations are also covered. Polymers are used in applications which require exposure to a variety of fluid environments. Tests to determine the effects of such exposure on material properties are well established. However, the determination of the effects on polymers exposed to fuels of variable alcohol and ether content poses new problems. This document seeks to address those concerns by detailing changes to standard tests that make them suitable for that purpose.
HISTORICAL
1998-01-01
Standard
J1748_199801
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to determining worst-case fuel, conditioning test specimens in worst-case fuel(s) prior to testing, individual tests for properties of polymers exposed to methanol-gasoline fuel mixtures. The determination of equilibrium, as well as typical calculations are also covered. Polymers are used in applications which require exposure to a variety of fluid environments. Tests to determine the effects of such exposure on material properties are well established. However, the determination of the effects on polymers exposed to fuels of variable alcohol and ether content poses new problems. This document seeks to address those concerns by detailing changes to standard tests that make them suitable for that purpose.
HISTORICAL
2007-07-20
Standard
J1747_200707
This SAE Information Report is intended to convey the test methods developed for use in testing with methanol and gasoline blends. Corrosion testing of metals has a long and varied history. In spite of the problems inherent in extrapolating results of accelerated tests on standard specimens to actual field durability, engineers have been able, to a large extent, to rely on these results in making materials selection decisions. However, these tests have generally employed aqueous media and are not strictly applicable to the use of organic chemical media. With methanol-gasoline fuel blends and their high electrical conductivity relative to gasoline, the relevance of the historical database is lost. Therefore, to allow rapid build-up of a new database, several corrosion test procedures have been reviewed and amended where appropriate.
CURRENT
2013-05-14
Standard
J1747_201305
This SAE Recommended Practice presents standardized test methods developed for use in testing with hydrocarbon fuels or their surrogates and those same fuels when blended with oxygenated fuel additives. Hydrocarbon fuels include Gasoline and Diesel fuel or their surrogates described in SAE J1681. Oxygenated additives include Ethanol, Methanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) and Fatty Acid Methyl Esters (FAME or Biodiesel).
CURRENT
2007-09-27
Standard
J1748_200709
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to determining worst-case fuel or test fluid surrogate, conditioning test specimens in worst-case fuel(s)/surrogate(s) prior to testing, individual tests for properties of polymeric materials exposed to oxygenate fuel/surrogate mixtures with additives. The determination of equilibrium, as well as typical calculations are also covered.
2016-05-10
WIP Standard
J1140
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for gasoline-powered passenger car and truck applications but may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications where refueling vapor recovery is required.
HISTORICAL
1976-12-01
Standard
J1140_197612
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for gasoline-powered passenger car and truck applications but may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications where refueling vapor recovery is required.
HISTORICAL
2000-04-04
Standard
J1140_200004
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for gasoline-powered passenger car and truck applications but may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications where refueling vapor recovery is required.
CURRENT
2012-08-06
Standard
J1140_201208
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for gasoline-powered passenger car and truck applications but may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications where refueling vapor recovery is required.
HISTORICAL
1988-02-01
Standard
J1140_198802
The purpose of this recommended practice is to ensure compatibility between new vehicle designs and refueling vapor recovery nozzles by their dimensions and specifications. This recommended practice was developed primarily for gasoline-powered passenger car and truck applications but may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications where refueling vapor recovery is required.
HISTORICAL
1980-03-01
Standard
J1140_198003
This SAE Recommended Practice was developed primarily for gasoline-powered passenger car and truck applications but may be used in marine, industrial, and similar applications where refueling vapor recovery is required.
2008-04-22
WIP Standard
J2260
This SAE Standard presents the minimum requirements for nonmetallic tubing with one or more layers manufactured for use as liquid-carrying or vapor-carrying component in fuel systems for gasoline, or alcohol blends with gasoline. Requirements in this document also apply to monowall tubing (one layer construction). When the construction has one or more layers of polymer-based compounds in the wall, the multilayer constructions are primarily for the purpose of improvement in permeation resistance to hydrocarbons found in various fuels. The tube construction can have a straight-wall configuration, a wall that is convoluted or corrugated, or a combination of each. It may have an innermost layer with improved electrical conductivity for use where such a characteristic is desired. The improved electrical conductivity can apply to the entire wall construction, if the tubing is a monowall. (For elastomeric based MLT constructions, refer to SAE J30 and SAE J2405).
CURRENT
2004-11-01
Standard
J2260_200411
This SAE Standard presents the minimum requirements for nonmetallic tubing with one or more layers manufactured for use as liquid-carrying or vapor-carrying component in fuel systems for gasoline, or alcohol blends with gasoline. Requirements in this document also apply to monowall tubing (one layer construction). When the construction has one or more layers of polymer-based compounds in the wall, the multilayer constructions are primarily for the purpose of improvement in permeation resistance to hydrocarbons found in various fuels. The tube construction can have a straight-wall configuration, a wall that is convoluted or corrugated, or a combination of each. It may have an innermost layer with improved electrical conductivity for use where such a characteristic is desired. The improved electrical conductivity can apply to the entire wall construction, if the tubing is a monowall. (For elastomeric based MLT constructions, refer to SAE J30 and SAE J2405).
CURRENT
2014-02-05
Standard
J2973_201402
This SAE recommended practice specifies a standard geometry leak channel to set the leak threshold and compare results from a variety of leak test technologies and test conditions. This practice applies to fuel system assemblies and components which have a risk of allowing regulated fuel or fuel vapors to continuously escape to atmosphere. A component or assembly tested to this standard has a zero HC leakage threshold because the selected leak channel (Equivalent Channel) will self-plug and will not emit measurable hydrocarbon liquid or vapors. Therefore this standard eliminates leaks as a source of evaporative emission. This practice was primarily developed for pressurized and non-pressurized fuel systems and components containing liquid hydrocarbon based fuels.
2011-03-31
WIP Standard
J2665
This test standard covers the procedure for measuring the permeation of fuel or fuel surrogates through test samples of elastomeric, plastic or composite materials, up to about 3 mm thick. The method involves filling a test cup with the test fluid (fuel or fuel surrogate), sealing test sample over the open end of the cup, and then placing the sealed container into an oven at the desired test temperature and measuring the weight loss over time. Permeation rates are calculated from the rate of weight loss and the exposed area of the test sample. Standard permeation test temperatures are 40 °C and 60 °C. Standard test fluids are Fuel C, Fuel CE10 and Fuel CM15. Other fluids, such as Fuel CMTBE15, and other volatile liquids may be tested according to this procedure as desired (SAE J1681). The method is not applicable for measuring permeation of higher boiling materials that will not completely evaporate from the exterior surface of the sample at the test temperature.
CURRENT
2006-10-13
Standard
J2665_200610
This test standard covers the procedure for measuring the permeation of fuel or fuel surrogates through test samples of elastomeric, plastic or composite materials, up to about 3 mm thick. The method involves filling a test cup with the test fluid (fuel or fuel surrogate), sealing test sample over the open end of the cup, and then placing the sealed container into an oven at the desired test temperature and measuring the weight loss over time. Permeation rates are calculated from the rate of weight loss and the exposed area of the test sample. Standard permeation test temperatures are 40 °C and 60 °C. Standard test fluids are Fuel C, Fuel CE10 and Fuel CM15. Other fluids, such as Fuel CMTBE15, and other volatile liquids may be tested according to this procedure as desired (SAE J1681). The method is not applicable for measuring permeation of higher boiling materials that will not completely evaporate from the exterior surface of the sample at the test temperature.
CURRENT
2010-06-16
Standard
J2663_201006
This test method is intended for measuring fuel permeation at elevated temperature through low permeating hose or tubing samples of elastomeric or composite construction. The expected accuracy of the method is about ±10% of the sample permeation rate. Hose permeation testing can be done two ways: Method A – Plug and Fill or Method B – using a fuel reservoir. Method A involves plugging one end of the hose, filling the sample to about 90% full with test fuel, plugging the other end, and then exposing the plugged sample to a desired test temperature, with the weight loss measured over time. Method B involves plugging one end of a hose, and then connecting the other end to a fuel reservoir. The hose sample and reservoir are then exposed to a desired test temperature with the weight loss measured over time. This procedure presents a recommended plug design that permits inserting the plugs prior to adding the test fluid.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 83