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HISTORICAL
1968-10-01
Standard
AIR999
In this report, "Cryogenically Fueled Dynamic Power Systems" include all open cycle, chemically fueled, dynamic engine power systems which utilize cryogenic fuels and oxidizers. For nearly all practical present day systems, this category is limited to cryogenic hydrogen or hydrogen-oxygen fueled cycles with potential in future, more advanced systems for replacement of oxygen by fluorine. Excluded from the category are static cryogenic systems (e.g., fuel cells) and chemical dynamic power systems which utilize earth storable propellants.
CURRENT
2011-08-03
Standard
AIR999A
In this report, "Cryogenically Fueled Dynamic Power Systems" include all open cycle, chemically fueled, dynamic engine power systems which utilize cryogenic fuels and oxidizers. For nearly all practical present day systems, this category is limited to cryogenic hydrogen or hydrogen-oxygen fueled cycles with potential in future, more advanced systems for replacement of oxygen by fluorine. Excluded from the category are static cryogenic systems (e.g., fuel cells) and chemical dynamic power systems which utilize earth storable propellants.
HISTORICAL
1997-10-01
Standard
AIR5060
The purpose of this document is to provide reference material for establishing compatibility of electronic gas turbine engine control systems and associated components with the electromagnetic environment and achieving compliance with associated airworthiness requirements.
2016-09-13
WIP Standard
AIR5060B
The purpose of this document is to provide reference material for establishing compatibility of electronic gas turbine engine control systems and associated components with the electromagnetic environment and achieving compliance with associated airworthiness requirements.
CURRENT
2011-08-11
Standard
AIR5060A
The purpose of this document is to provide reference material for establishing compatibility of electronic gas turbine engine control systems and associated components with the electromagnetic environment and achieving compliance with associated airworthiness requirements.
CURRENT
2013-11-11
Standard
AIR4994A
Gas compressors (air and other compressible fluids) have been used sporadically since the 1940's for various utility functions in aerospace applications. They have been used to provide power to gun purge and drive systems, engine or APU starters (recharge accumulators), reservoir pressurization, cockpit pressurization, braking systems, canopy seals, engine control devices, landing gear activation, and boosted flight controls (see Table 1). In current state-of-the-art aircraft, most pneumatic system power is extracted from a stage of compression in the turbo-jet engine. As more and more demands are put on new generation engines for fuel economy and performance there is an increasing need for a new source of pneumatic power. This document is intended to describe current state-of-the-art technology in compressors, define the limitations, discuss enhancements needed and attempt to predict the needs of the future.
CURRENT
2013-06-17
Standard
AIR1343B
This information report presents a preliminary discussion of liquid propellant gas generation (LPGG) systems. A LPGG system, as used herein, is defined as a system which stores a liquid propellant and, on command, discharges and converts the liquid propellant to a gas. The LPGG system can interface with a gas-to-mechanical energy conversion device to make up an auxiliary power system. Figure 1 shows a block diagram of LPGG system components which include a propellant tank, propellant expulsion system, propellant control and a decomposition (or combustion) chamber. The purpose of this report is to provide general information on the variety of components and system arrangements which can be considered in LPGG design, summarize advantages and disadvantages of various approaches and provide basic sizing methods suitable for initial tradeoff purposes.
CURRENT
1977-08-01
Standard
AIR1423
The purpose of this AIR is to acquaint the aerospace industry with problems in attaining electromagnetic compatibility on gas turbine engines, particularly as used in aircraft. It is also the purpose of this AIR to present guidelines for the application of EMC controls to the engine, to its components which of necessity must operate in very hostile environments and to its interface with the aircraft.
CURRENT
1998-12-01
Standard
AIR1425A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a description of methods to be employed to achieve Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) of gas turbine engine accessories. Its primary objectives are to aid those system designers of gas turbine assemblies who are employing commercial accessories, which are not always EMC designed, and to outline methods of achieving EMC employing readily available test instrumentation.
CURRENT
1999-01-01
Standard
AIR1500
The following bibliography on lossy filters for use on electrical and electronic systems was prepared by the Lossy Filter Subcommittee AE-4C.2 of the Society of Automotive Engineers. The bibliography is in chronological sequence and is oriented toward the use of lossy materials to attenuate radio frequency noise on transmission lines.
CURRENT
1999-01-01
Standard
AIR1509
This AIR discusses the use and application of EMC antennas and antenna factors. The relationships between antenna gain, antenna factor, power density (W/m2), and field strength (V/m) are discussed. Some examples of their use are given. Illustrations of commercially available EMC antennas commonly used in performing EMI measurements are included. In addition to the illustrations, the antenna factors, frequency ranges, typical uses (applications), and the manufacturers of these antennas are also listed.
CURRENT
1998-12-01
Standard
AIR1394A
These cable practice recommendations tend toward design guidance rather than standardization. EMC achievement tests can be standardized, but the means for achievement should not be constrained. The material can best be described as an essay on cabling, and the theme is that a cable is just a part of a complete circuit, the interconnect circuit. Cable EMC performance is thus determined largely by circuit design; it is unrealistic to expect cabling techniques to compensate for improper impedance, symmetry or waveform in the circuit.
HISTORICAL
1978-02-01
Standard
AIR1394
CURRENT
1976-02-01
Standard
AIR1406
CURRENT
1976-03-01
Standard
AIR1404
This AIR discusses the DC resistivity property of EMI gaskets.
CURRENT
2013-01-07
Standard
ARP5416A
This document is one of a set covering the whole spectrum of aircraft interaction with lightning. This document is intended to describe how to conduct lightning direct effects tests and indirect system upset effects tests. Indirect effects upset and damage tolerance tests for individual equipment items are addressed in DO-160/ED-14. Documents relating to other aspects of the certification process, including definition of the lightning environment, zoning, and indirect effects certification are listed in Section 2. This document presents test techniques for simulated lightning testing of aircraft and the associated systems. This document does not include design criteria nor does it specify which items should or should not be tested. Acceptable levels of damage and/or pass/fail criteria for the qualification tests must be approved by the cognizant certification authority for each particular case.
2014-06-11
WIP Standard
ARP5414B
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines lightning strike zones and provides guidelines for locating them on particular aircraft, together with examples. The zone definitions and location guidelines described herein are applicable to Parts 23, 25, 27, and 29 aircraft. The zone location guidelines and examples are representative of in-flight lightning exposures.
CURRENT
2005-02-16
Standard
ARP5414A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines lightning strike zones and provides guidelines for locating them on particular aircraft, together with examples. The zone definitions and location guidelines described herein are applicable to Parts 23, 25, 27, and 29 aircraft. The zone location guidelines and examples are representative of in-flight lightning exposures.
HISTORICAL
1999-11-01
Standard
ARP5412
The environment and test waveforms defined in this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) account for the best lightning data and analysis currently available. The quantified environment and levels herein represent the minimum currently required by certifying authorities, consistent with the approach applied in related lightning documents. Lightning, like any natural phenomenon, is probabilistic in nature. Levels and waveforms vary considerably from one flash to the next. These standardized voltage and current waveforms have been derived to represent the lightning environment, and are used to assess the direct effects of lightning on aircraft. The standardized external current waveforms have in turn been used to derive standardized transient voltage and current waveforms which can be expected to appear on the cable bundles and at equipment interfaces.
HISTORICAL
2005-02-21
Standard
ARP5412A
The environment and test waveforms defined in this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) account for the best lightning data and analysis currently available. The quantified environment and levels herein represent the minimum currently required by certifying authorities, consistent with the approach applied in related lightning documents. Lightning, like any natural phenomenon, is probabilistic in nature. Levels and waveforms vary considerably from one flash to the next. These standardized voltage and current waveforms have been derived to represent the lightning environment, and are used to assess the direct effects of lightning on aircraft. The standardized external current waveforms have in turn been used to derive standardized transient voltage and current waveforms which can be expected to appear on the cable bundles and at equipment interfaces.
HISTORICAL
1999-11-01
Standard
ARP5413
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidance for a means of showing compliance with the regulations for hazards caused by the lightning environment to electrical/electronic systems installed either on or within aircraft. Equipment hazards addressed include those due to indirect effects on equipment and its associated wiring that is mounted on the aircraft exterior as well as indirect effects on equipment and its associated wiring located within the aircraft interior. This document applies to new aircraft and equipment designs, modifications of existing aircraft or equipment, and applications of existing (off the shelf) equipment on new aircraft. NOTE: This ARP does not address direct effects such as burning, eroding, blasting, of aircraft structure nor does it address fuel ignition hazards (see related reading material in 2.3 of this document). This ARP does not address lightning zoning methods or lightning test requirements, methods, and techniques.
CURRENT
2013-01-11
Standard
ARP5412B
The environment and test waveforms defined in this SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) account for the best lightning data and analysis currently available. The quantified environment and levels herein represent the minimum currently required by certifying authorities, consistent with the approach applied in related lightning documents. Lightning, like other weather phenomenon, is probabilistic in nature. Levels and waveforms vary considerably from one flash to the next. Within this document, standardized voltage and current waveforms have been derived to represent the lightning environment external to an aircraft. These standardized waveforms are used to assess the effects of lightning on aircraft. The standardized external current waveforms have in turn been used to derive standardized transient voltage and current test waveforms that can be expected to appear on cable bundles and at equipment interfaces within an aircraft.
HISTORICAL
2003-01-11
Standard
ARP5583
This guide provides detailed information, guidance, and methods related to the Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular (AC)/Joint Airworthiness Authorities Advisory Material Joint (AMJ) 20-XXX, "Certification of Aircraft Electrical/Electronic Systems for Operation in the High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Environment" (draft). The AC/AMJ provides acceptable means, but not the only means, of compliance with Parts 23, 25, 27, and 29 of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR)/Joint Aviation Regulations (JAR) to prevent hazards to aircraft electrical and electronic systems due to HIRF produced by external transmitters. This guide is neither mandatory nor regulatory in nature and does not constitute a regulation or legal interpretation of the regulation. The information in this guide represents a collection of best engineering practices that have been used to certify aircraft HIRF protection.
CURRENT
2010-06-04
Standard
ARP5583A
This guide provides detailed information, guidance, and methods related to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Advisory Circular (AC) 20-158 and European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) draft Advisory Material Joint (AMJ), both titled "The Certification of Aircraft Electrical and Electronic Systems for Operation in the High-Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) Environment". The AC provides acceptable means, but not the only means, of compliance with Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317, High-Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) protection for Aircraft Electrical and Electronic Systems, and applicable FAA HIRF Special Conditions to prevent hazards to aircraft electrical and electronic systems due to HIRF produced by external transmitters. It is also intended for this guide to provide the same information, guidance, and methods to the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) interim HIRF policies certification requirements.
HISTORICAL
1995-10-01
Standard
ARP4874
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidelines for the format and content of documents defining the interface between electronic propulsion control systems and aircraft systems. The scope includes civilian aircraft powered by turbofan, turboprop, and turboshaft engines equipped with electronic engine controls.
CURRENT
2013-08-29
Standard
ARP4874A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) provides guidelines for the format and content of documents defining the interface between electronic propulsion control systems and aircraft systems. The scope includes civilian aircraft powered by turbofan, turboprop, and turboshaft engines equipped with electronic engine controls.
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